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Cream Ale Cream of Three Crops (Cream Ale)

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copachono

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i just brew it the wrong way

i used:

4# pilsner
2.5# wheat light
1# rice cooked
2# pocorn just grinded and toosed at mash,

i got 1042 OG so i guess im on the mark but im going to leave this one for 2 week on primary,

for the yeast i used a cake that used to be BYR 97 ale yeast
 

ArizonaGoalie

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I attempted to make this a Vienna Cream Ale. Replaced the 2-row with Vienna malt and added a touch of Special Roast malt, cutting back slightly on the rice. Used Tettnang hops to bitter and aroma/flavor and US-05 yeast.

Aimed for 4.5%, ran into a little efficiency issue and finished at exactly 4%, which I'm okay with. I only mashed for 60 minutes, fully intending 90, but had a brew night brain fart while blasting Pearl Jam in the garage.

Long story short, it turned out great. Nice, subtle biscuit/roasty taste, similar to a Fat Tire Amber, but with the lightness of the famous Cream of Three Crops. Gorgeous, light copper color and sweet corn nose.

Here's the real verdict: SWMBO kept slipping out to the garage to fill her pint glass from the keg, 4x today by my count. Now that's a winner!
20201213_183614.jpg
 

Consigliere

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Wanted to circle back on a post I had regarding additional hops to the base (original) recipe on this thread. I have made it twice now, once the exact original recipe scaled to 5G and the second time exact original recipe however, did a whirlpool addition of 14G of lemon drop hops which I whirlpooled at 160oF for 20 min then chilled and fermented. There was a noticeable, but subtle, citrus flavor to the final product and was a bit brighter than the original. It was super crushable, very clean and clear still. Next time I may go up to a full ounce of hops to test this and might think about a split batch with some dry hopping.

I would highly recommend some bright, modern whirlpool hops to add a bit more flavour to this base recipe if that is a desire. I plan on having some form of this recipe on my keg rotation pretty often, especially in summer time.
 

Consigliere

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I attempted to make this a Vienna Cream Ale. Replaced the 2-row with Vienna malt and added a touch of Special Roast malt, cutting back slightly on the rice. Used Tettnang hops to bitter and aroma/flavor and US-05 yeast.

Aimed for 4.5%, ran into a little efficiency issue and finished at exactly 4%, which I'm okay with. I only mashed for 60 minutes, fully intending 90, but had a brew night brain fart while blasting Pearl Jam in the garage.

Long story short, it turned out great. Nice, subtle biscuit/roasty taste, similar to a Fat Tire Amber, but with the lightness of the famous Cream of Three Crops. Gorgeous, light copper color and sweet corn nose.

Here's the real verdict: SWMBO kept slipping out to the garage to fill her pint glass from the keg, 4x today by my count. Now that's a winner!
View attachment 710168
This looks really good, mind posting the details of how much special roast vs rice and other ingredients? I love this recipe, but for those of us in Canada, winter is not a great fit for this beer, and this recipe would lend itself more to a cold season version I think. Would love to try it.
 
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I've seen people inquire about this recipe being able to successfully convert to 5 gallon extract recipe, but nothing has been answered about it. I am happy to see that this is a killer recipe to try out when I eventually go AG.
 

z-bob

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I've seen people inquire about this recipe being able to successfully convert to 5 gallon extract recipe, but nothing has been answered about it. I am happy to see that this is a killer recipe to try out when I eventually go AG.
The recipe probably doesn't convert well, but you can probably get pretty close using light malt extract plus either rice syrup solids, or a little plain old sugar. I wouldn't use both rice solids and sugar, nor go much over 10% sugar. I've brewed a nice AG cream ale using 95% pale 2-row malt and 5% sugar.

I have a 1.5kg can of light malt extract, I might try brewing a 3 gallon batch with that and a half pound of sugar to see what I get... That should end up about 4.8% ABV which is a good number, but that might be too heavy on the sugar. OTOH the LME probably has some crystal malt in it.
 

ArizonaGoalie

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This looks really good, mind posting the details of how much special roast vs rice and other ingredients? I love this recipe, but for those of us in Canada, winter is not a great fit for this beer, and this recipe would lend itself more to a cold season version I think. Would love to try it.
Absolutely....although, since you're Canadian, my grudge against you for relegating us to silver medals in hockey in Salt Lake AND Vancouver is still strong. 😜 🏒🥈

I brewed 4 gallons. It was:

61.5% Vienna malt (4 lbs)
23.1% Flaked corn (1.5 lbs)
7.7% Minute Rice (.5 lbs)
7.7% Special roast (.5lbs)

.75 oz Tettenang @ 60
.50 oz Tettenang @ 30
.25 oz Tettenang @ 15

US-05 yeast

Primary 14 days; Secondary 10 days; Kegged

This version benefits from a week or two in the keg due to the subtle roast flavor, I believe. The longer it's been in the keg, the more a delightful caramel/nutty note has been developing, thanks to using Vienna malt as the base.

Drinking a pint now. It's lovely on a wintery 50 degree night here in San Diego. :)
 

Consigliere

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Absolutely....although, since you're Canadian, my grudge against you for relegating us to silver medals in hockey in Salt Lake AND Vancouver is still strong. 😜 🏒🥈

I brewed 4 gallons. It was:

61.5% Vienna malt (4 lbs)
23.1% Flaked corn (1.5 lbs)
7.7% Minute Rice (.5 lbs)
7.7% Special roast (.5lbs)

.75 oz Tettenang @ 60
.50 oz Tettenang @ 30
.25 oz Tettenang @ 15

US-05 yeast

Primary 14 days; Secondary 10 days; Kegged

This version benefits from a week or two in the keg due to the subtle roast flavor, I believe. The longer it's been in the keg, the more a delightful caramel/nutty note has been developing, thanks to using Vienna malt as the base.

Drinking a pint now. It's lovely on a wintery 50 degree night here in San Diego. :)
Awesome thanks. I would trade gold medals for SD weather. It’s all about what you don’t have!
 

cmac62

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Absolutely....although, since you're Canadian, my grudge against you for relegating us to silver medals in hockey in Salt Lake AND Vancouver is still strong. 😜 🏒🥈

I brewed 4 gallons. It was:

61.5% Vienna malt (4 lbs)
23.1% Flaked corn (1.5 lbs)
7.7% Minute Rice (.5 lbs)
7.7% Special roast (.5lbs)

.75 oz Tettenang @ 60
.50 oz Tettenang @ 30
.25 oz Tettenang @ 15

US-05 yeast

Primary 14 days; Secondary 10 days; Kegged

This version benefits from a week or two in the keg due to the subtle roast flavor, I believe. The longer it's been in the keg, the more a delightful caramel/nutty note has been developing, thanks to using Vienna malt as the base.

Drinking a pint now. It's lovely on a wintery 50 degree night here in San Diego. :)
Burr, that is a little chilly. I'm in Lake Elsinore. LOL. :ban:
 

Mr. Vern

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Brewed this on 12/06 and as many others stated it is a nice brew! I was a little heavy on corn and a few oz light on rice, otherwise it was a scaled 5g batch of the original post.

Now to fiddle with yeast and practices, it'll be brewed again as I have a couple friends who will be looking for more.
 

ShepFL

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I've seen people inquire about this recipe being able to successfully convert to 5 gallon extract recipe, but nothing has been answered about it. I am happy to see that this is a killer recipe to try out when I eventually go AG.
Go BIAB and you are AG. Simple one vessel and much better beer. You will amaze yourself.
 

z-bob

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I've seen people inquire about this recipe being able to successfully convert to 5 gallon extract recipe, but nothing has been answered about it. I am happy to see that this is a killer recipe to try out when I eventually go AG.
Have you seen this? Rooster Tail Cream Ale (Cream of Three Crops knock off)

But I agree with Shep, try doing brew in a bag. (BIAB) Better beer, more control, and it's cheaper to brew. You can use a cheap paint strainer bag from the hardware store to get started; buy a better bag custom fit to your kettle later.
 
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I just saw that one, @z-bob ! Thank you. I currently have an 8 gallon Bayou Classic kettle, as I was planning ahead for the future of all grain brewing. Not to get off topic, but how much grain can an 8 gallon kettle hold to make a 5.5 gallon batch?
 

z-bob

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I use an 8 gallon kettle to brew 4 gallon batches and it works very well. I think I could go up to 5 or 5.5 gallons with a little planning and juggling*, but I have lots of plastic 4 gallon carboys, and 4 gallons is a good size.

What is your heat source? Except in the heat of summer, I brew on my kitchen stove (natural gas.) Even the high-output burner had trouble boiling 5 gallons in a heavy kettle until I added an electric heat stick to help it out. Without that, I really don't think it would be able to boil 6 gallons. (the turkey fryer I use in the summer would handle it just fine but would use a lot of propane, with the heat stick it uses a *lot* less propane)

*by that, I mean mash using about 4 gallons of water. Pull the bag out and drain it, then put the bag in a white plastic bucket (the white buckets are food grade) and add the rest of your hot water. Let the bag soak for 10 minutes, pull it out and drain/squeeze again, and pour the squeezings into the kettle. The kettle probably won't hold all the water and the grain at the same time. This little dance is not that hard to do.
 
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I use an 8 gallon kettle to brew 4 gallon batches and it works very well. I think I could go up to 5 or 5.5 gallons with a little planning and juggling, but I have lots of plastic 4 gallon carboys, and 4 gallons is a good size.

What is your heat source? Except in the heat of summer, I brew on my kitchen stove (natural gas.) Even the high-output burner had trouble boiling 5 gallons in a heavy kettle until I added an electric heat stick to help it out. Without that, I really don't think it would be able to boil 6 gallons. (the turkey fryer I use in the summer would handle it just fine but would use a lot of propane, with the heat stick it uses a *lot* less propane)
I have a large ceramic cook top stove that I currently brew from and do full volume boils with it(5.5-6 gallons). I recently was gifted a sous-vide from my Mother(she couldn't find the motivation to keep using it), so I will be able to mash with it doing BIAB. I eventually want to do a two-vessel system and brew in the garage/backyard, depending on weather.
 

cmac62

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I have a large ceramic cook top stove that I currently brew from and do full volume boils with it(5.5-6 gallons). I recently was gifted a sous-vide from my Mother(she couldn't find the motivation to keep using it), so I will be able to mash with it doing BIAB. I eventually want to do a two-vessel system and brew in the garage/backyard, depending on weather.
If I was in your spot, I'd look into one of the all in one units. I have a 3-v system and a Anvil Foundry, and I really like the foundry. It is fairly cheep, easy to use and makes great beer. Good luck :mug:
 
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