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GilaMinumBeer

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Seems to good to be true for a Home Use "Evaluation" perspective.

I was comparing the cost of Windows 7 Pro and Office 2010 Pro at $350+ship to the $199 Standard subscription rate at TechNet.

I've read through all the FAQ and googled everything I can think of and have come to the conclusion that,

- Licenses do not expire if the subscription is dropped.
- All apps are Genuine Microsoft Authenticated (to pass that BS)
- The softwares are complete, unrestricted, full release copies.
- A backup install disc can be made from the ISO download
- The apps are updateable.
- The license is for Evaluation ONLY. So, basically the same as Home Use. You can do just about anything with the application except generate an income with the products from them. Like Home and Student versions but with all the features.

So, why isn't everyone all over this?

What is the compelling reason to pay Full Retail or get the OEM installers license?
 

Brewing Clamper

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To quote Ed, "You sir, are correct!" My brother started his own Net Consulting company and has this. I got Win7 & Office2010 from his sub. There are no restrictions and none of that Genuine Microsoft Authentication crap. They update automatically without issue... The main point they care about is "Evaluation ONLY!" they do not want you to use any of this into business production.
 
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GilaMinumBeer

GilaMinumBeer

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To quote Ed, "You sir, are correct!" My brother started his own Net Consulting company and has this. I got Win7 & Office2010 from his sub. There are no restrictions and none of that Genuine Microsoft Authentication crap. They update automatically without issue... The main point they care about is "Evaluation ONLY!" they do not want you to use any of this into business production.
Yup. I get that.

And have no intention of any commercial application of the software. Strictly personal use at home. I don't see that as a violation of the Evaluation License rules.
 

KurtB

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Commercial or not, any restriction would fall under the interpretation of the lawyers & courts. This clause in the EULA would limit you to simply evaluate the software:

You may use the evaluation software only to evaluate it. You may not use it in a live operating, in a staging environment or with data that has not been sufficiently backed up.
Using it on a regular basis for normal everyday functions would probably be considered a violation of the "live operating" clause.

And from the main Technet page this is what you are allowed to do:

TechNet Subscriptions software may be tested to determine the following:

Install/Uninstall – Time and process required for full, partial or upgrade software install/uninstall processes and system integration.
Recovery – Capacity for software to recover from crashes, hardware failures, or other catastrophic problems.
Security – Defining software’s ability to protect against unauthorized internal or external access.
Compatibility – Gauging software performance in existing or new hardware, software, operating system or network environments.
Comparison – Evaluating software to determine product strengths and weaknesses as compared to previous versions or similar products.
Usability – Assessing satisfaction among end users, observing end user utilization and understanding user interaction scenarios.
Performance – Ensuring software will perform as expected to requirements.
Stability – Estimating individual software’s ability to perform consistently, relative to system demands.
Environment – Determining software settings while software is being evaluated by end users in existing infrastructure.
That said, I don't think Microsoft will spend the time or resources to chase after you. Microsoft did get smart and started limiting the number of installs allowed per license key.

Ultimately, as spelled out right on the main page of the technet site, the program is designed for IT people. There is nothing in place yet to stop the advanced home user from paying for a subscription. As long as you are fine with your interpretation of the EULA, I say go for it.

As to why are more people not "all over this"? Two simple reasons. Cost & ability. The average person is not purchasing Windows 7 Pro, they are purchasing a new computer. They are also not purchasing Office 2010 Pro, but rather Office 2010 Home & Student ($120 for a 3 user license) along with their new computer.

This means they only paid $120 (not counting the new PC), and did not have to worry about downloads, burning .iso images (something most people don't have a clue how to do), operating system upgrades, and paying $199 for a yearly subscription.

Enjoy your subscription. :mug:
 

KurtB

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To quote Ed, "You sir, are correct!" My brother started his own Net Consulting company and has this. I got Win7 & Office2010 from his sub. There are no restrictions and none of that Genuine Microsoft Authentication crap. They update automatically without issue... The main point they care about is "Evaluation ONLY!" they do not want you to use any of this into business production.
They also care about sharing the license. Technically, if your brother has the simple Technet subscription that this thread is about, it is licensed for his use only. By giving you a copy of Windows and Office, he violated his EULA, and they could pull his subscription and cancel his license keys. This one is pretty clear, though I don't think Microsoft would ever even know it happened (short of a license audit). The company I work for purchases multiple licenses every year, through our volume license program, even though we could probably get the job done by using just one license. It means too much to the bottom line of the company to stay legal with our software.
 
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GilaMinumBeer

GilaMinumBeer

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Commercial or not, any restriction would fall under the interpretation of the lawyers & courts. This clause in the EULA would limit you to simply evaluate the software:
Yeah. I did overlook the term used for "live operating environment" and agree that it does take it out of the comparison of the Home and Student versions.

But, with regard to the definitions of what can be done within the "evaluation" scope, who's to say it doesn;t take me a year, or three, to thouroughly evaluate the OS and application? I've had Vista Home Premium 64 bit now for a year or two and my personal evaluation is that it's time to evaluate something else more capable, and stable at networking. :D

Enjoy your subscription. :mug:
I am still wavering. But getting closer to making that jump.

Years ago when AutoDesk's AutoCAD was still a MS-DOS application requiring a licensed dongle to operate there were a few classmates convicted of piracy by making copies of the applications and cloning dongles. I have no idea how they did it but they got caught rather quickly and were dealt with swiftly.

Of course, they were profiting from their actions. And what I am considering here is not for financial gains so much as for debit minimalization. :eek:

$319 for a Full Retail license copy capable of clean install is criminal.
 
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