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ANVIL FOUNDRY ALL-GRAIN BREWING SYSTEM

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NobleNewt

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Sorry I wasn't specific, my last sentence was meant to say I have used the Foundry yet.

Beer making in anything should however be similar. Crush fine, add rice hulls if nervous about the fine crush, sparge (aka rinse). You shouldn't have too many issues w/ efficiency. In the end you are just soaking grain and getting its contents, no real magic. The idea that a bag makes much difference either way says to me we have other variables going on and super small sample sizes to work off of.
That's what I figured. I know that the recirculation is necessary for keeping temperatures consistent throughout the Foundry, but my crush is relatively fine (since I BIAB) which helps get me closer to 90% mash efficiency. I suppose some rice hulls would make a big difference. I've also always squeezed my bag to get the most liquid out of the grain as possible. With a Foundry, I could literally press the bag/basket with a pot lid to maximize the liquid into the boil kettle.
 

mcmeador

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Are you all finding the Foundry thermostat to be inaccurate when chilling after the boil? This is my second brew in the Foundry, and I’ve noticed when using the immersion chiller afterward that the Foundry thermostat reads much higher than the actual temp.

For instance, after about 20 minutes of running the chiller tonight, the Foundry thermostat still showed about 140 degrees. I took the temp with a sanitized thermometer and it was around 80. I confirmed this temperature when I transferred to my fermenter and my temp control read 77 degrees.

Any idea why that would be off like that?
 

mcmeador

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I’ve often thought about getting the steam slayer for the foundry myself. Just curious - not sure if you are on 240v or 120v but how much does this change boil off? Never used a CIP ball as I just do a CIP PBW after each brew with the normal recirc setup and a simple sponge wipes it all clean as a whistle each time.
Well I didn’t get to use the Steam Slayer tonight. I have a fancy kitchen sink that I had to rig up an adapter for in order to connect the Steam Slayer, but it failed right after the boil began and started spraying water all over the kitchen. I ended up just boiling lidless. I’ll have to order the connector that screws onto the water shut-off valve under the sink I guess.

Also tried the Spike CIP ball with my Chugger pump tonight, but it just wouldn’t work. I think maybe it couldn’t pull the water through the Foundry valve fast enough to power it. Oh well!
 

DarrellQ

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Are you all finding the Foundry thermostat to be inaccurate when chilling after the boil? This is my second brew in the Foundry, and I’ve noticed when using the immersion chiller afterward that the Foundry thermostat reads much higher than the actual temp.

For instance, after about 20 minutes of running the chiller tonight, the Foundry thermostat still showed about 140 degrees. I took the temp with a sanitized thermometer and it was around 80. I confirmed this temperature when I transferred to my fermenter and my temp control read 77 degrees.

Any idea why that would be off like that?
Yes, just did the first brew with my Foundry and noticed the same thing. Unfortunately, I didn't use my digital thermometer and just trusted the Foundry's temp reading. Maybe that was the problem with my mash-in too? I had my strike water at 159 as the manual said, and it took over 20 minutes after mash-in to drop to 152 according to the Foundry's temp reading. Maybe that temp wasn't correct? To your point, after the boil and running the chiller, after 25 minutes it still showed 150. I think something is messed-up.
 

bwible

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For those of you using a bag, does anyone get those extraordinary BIAB efficiencies with this system? Like the ones in the neighborhood of 85% to 90% mash efficiency?
I do not use a bag. I calculate all my recipes at 70% efficiency and the end result is usually spot on. I know some consider that low.

I use BeerTools on a mac for software. It’s not the newest version as I’m not able to update to that. My mac laptop is a 2007 model, I pretty much only use it for brewing, it barely runs Yosemite, can’t update to High Sierra, and I can’t justify spending thousands on a new macbook pro just to run brewing software. This still does what I need and more.

I have a non-adjustable JSP malt mill that I’ve had for 20+ years. Probably my biggest reason for less than optimal efficiency. But again, not something I want to spend money to upgrade.

I do 10 or 11 (3) gallon batches a year and this setup suits me fine. The cost of upgrades would far outweigh the extra pennies I’m spending on the extra grain in these batches that would make the difference between 70% and 80%.
 

bwible

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Yeah. Problem is, it's 1.5 hours to the nearest HBS.
We had a few shops close here over the past several years and I’m in a similar situation. I get the majority of my stuff from internet orders. I will make the long drive once or twice a year to pick up things like sacks of grain, glass carboys that need to be replaced, or other items that don’t ship easily. Look for places that offer free shipping or a reduced price value shipping.
 

NobleNewt

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We had a few shops close here over the past several years and I’m in a similar situation. I get the majority of my stuff from internet orders. I will make the long drive once or twice a year to pick up things like sacks of grain, glass carboys that need to be replaced, or other items that don’t ship easily. Look for places that offer free shipping or a reduced price value shipping.
Yeah, that's why I usually get 3 or 4 batches worth of ingredients every time (free shipping). I just realized yesterday that Northern Brewer has free shipping on orders of $40, which is better than my "local" HBS.

I guess, technically, Homebrew Supply/Keg Connection is 30 minutes away in Comanche. I've spoken to them before and they said they could leave my order outside for me to pick up after hours if needed. Still, for the gas money, I'd rather spend a few dollars extra in shipping or buy some supplies I need anyway to get free shipping.

I'll likely wait until Black Friday to see if I can save a little bit on a Foundry before I pull the trigger. Just trying to figure out how I can make my other 3 unbrewed recipes work out with the potential efficiency losses in the new system. Likely will purchase about 10 lbs. of 2-row and some extra DME to make up for any losses.
 

Noob_Brewer

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Yeah, that's why I usually get 3 or 4 batches worth of ingredients every time (free shipping). I just realized yesterday that Northern Brewer has free shipping on orders of $40, which is better than my "local" HBS.

I guess, technically, Homebrew Supply/Keg Connection is 30 minutes away in Comanche. I've spoken to them before and they said they could leave my order outside for me to pick up after hours if needed. Still, for the gas money, I'd rather spend a few dollars extra in shipping or buy some supplies I need anyway to get free shipping.

I'll likely wait until Black Friday to see if I can save a little bit on a Foundry before I pull the trigger. Just trying to figure out how I can make my other 3 unbrewed recipes work out with the potential efficiency losses in the new system. Likely will purchase about 10 lbs. of 2-row and some extra DME to make up for any losses.
It may be different this year not sure but last year I bought the foundry 10.5g (just the foundry) at reg price and neither the 10.5g or the 6.5g went on sale anywhere that I could see. They all have MAP pricing. However anvil did sell the recirc package at 20% off on Black Friday = $80 from $100. I bought the recirc package at $80 from anvil.
 

mbg

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Well I didn’t get to use the Steam Slayer tonight. I have a fancy kitchen sink that I had to rig up an adapter for in order to connect the Steam Slayer, but it failed right after the boil began and started spraying water all over the kitchen. I ended up just boiling lidless. I’ll have to order the connector that screws onto the water shut-off valve under the sink I guess.

Also tried the Spike CIP ball with my Chugger pump tonight, but it just wouldn’t work. I think maybe it couldn’t pull the water through the Foundry valve fast enough to power it. Oh well!
With the steam slayer just make sure you have a clear path for the liquid to exit. On FB there is a photo of an imploded Foundry that wasn't vented - think he put the drain hose in a bucket and the liquid level went above the hose.
 

mcmeador

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With the steam slayer just make sure you have a clear path for the liquid to exit. On FB there is a photo of an imploded Foundry that wasn't vented - think he put the drain hose in a bucket and the liquid level went above the hose.
Thanks for the tip. Yes, I just have the drain hose stuck down the kitchen sink drain. The problem I had was at the water-in. I have one of those pull-down hose faucets, and the fitting that the sprayer head is connected to is 3/8 male. I bought a 3/8 female to 3/4 male fitting, but it didn’t seal the way the kitchen hose is designed so water just flowed backwards around the hose.

Then I decided I would try to make my own adapter by connecting my 3/8 female to barb fitting to a short piece of clear tubing and then connect a barb to 3/4 male fitting to the other end of the tubing so that the Steam Slayer water-in could be screwed on to that.

Well it worked the night before when I tested for an hour, but I did notice the tubing running between the barbs was swollen at both ends and I was a little concerned that there was too much pressure for it. Last night the tubing split right as I was beginning the boil and sprayed water all over the kitchen. Luckily I was still in there and heard a hissing sound and turned the water off before it caused too much trouble.
 

NobleNewt

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It may be different this year not sure but last year I bought the foundry 10.5g (just the foundry) at reg price and neither the 10.5g or the 6.5g went on sale anywhere that I could see. They all have MAP pricing. However anvil did sell the recirc package at 20% off on Black Friday = $80 from $100. I bought the recirc package at $80 from anvil.
That's good to know. I've noticed the MAP and MSRP pricing across almost all of the websites. You never know, sales may have been slow for Blichmann/Anvil in 2020 (seriously doubt it as homebrewing has boomed during the pandemic). I'll likely still wait til around Black Friday or around Christmas to make sure all of my Xmas shopping is taken care of before I spend money on an Anvil.
 

mcmeador

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Yes, just did the first brew with my Foundry and noticed the same thing. Unfortunately, I didn't use my digital thermometer and just trusted the Foundry's temp reading. Maybe that was the problem with my mash-in too? I had my strike water at 159 as the manual said, and it took over 20 minutes after mash-in to drop to 152 according to the Foundry's temp reading. Maybe that temp wasn't correct? To your point, after the boil and running the chiller, after 25 minutes it still showed 150. I think something is messed-up.
I asked Short Circuited Brewers about this on YouTube and got this reply that makes a lot of sense.
 

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coypoo

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I have been brewing for almost 7 years with 80+ 5-10 gal batches done but due to a lot of things happening in 2018-2019 I had to sell essentially all my home brewing equipment. I previously had the usual cooler, keggle, propane burner set up, but now for many reasons as I’m getting ready to get back in I want to go electric so the AF looks appealing for the price compared to any other electric system I’ve seen.

My only concern is the potential lack of “versatility” compared to my previous methods. I don’t foresee many 10 gal batches in the near future, but down the line the chances are higher. Also, I do like to do a yearly RIS or BW which may be limited to 3-4 or so gallons given the grain restraints of the AF.

So I guess my question is, would it be wiser to save up and “buy once, cry once” on a larger capacity system? Or could I use the AF as a HLT and kettle, and mash in a cooler for larger grain bill recipes?
 

Noob_Brewer

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I have been brewing for almost 7 years with 80+ 5-10 gal batches done but due to a lot of things happening in 2018-2019 I had to sell essentially all my home brewing equipment. I previously had the usual cooler, keggle, propane burner set up, but now for many reasons as I’m getting ready to get back in I want to go electric so the AF looks appealing for the price compared to any other electric system I’ve seen.

My only concern is the potential lack of “versatility” compared to my previous methods. I don’t foresee many 10 gal batches in the near future, but down the line the chances are higher. Also, I do like to do a yearly RIS or BW which may be limited to 3-4 or so gallons given the grain restraints of the AF.

So I guess my question is, would it be wiser to save up and “buy once, cry once” on a larger capacity system? Or could I use the AF as a HLT and kettle, and mash in a cooler for larger grain bill recipes?
I bought the AF 10.5g about a year ago and did my first brew on it in january. This is my first (and only) system. As far as "versatility" Im assuming based on your post, you are referring to the range of gravity you can get on this system. I have been able to achieve an OG of 1.071 without the use of sugars (dextrose, candi syrup, etc) with about 16.5lbs of grain (yes you can safely go over the manufacturers 16lb max grain capacity). I have been able to achieve 75-76% mash/lauter efficiency with this unit. I do use a bag in the malt-pipe which allows me to crush finer and I do sparge on most of my beers as well which helps with efficiency. I have run 28 batches thus far, mostly IPAs, Pale ales, NEIPAs, and a couple belgian beers. I am planning on brewing my first stout in the next month which will require me to go over 20lbs of grain, targeting about a ~9% abv stout. So my plan for this one is a reiterated mash technique where you mash twice, each with half the grain bill, and the second grain bill mashes uses the wort from the first mash. The drawback to reiterated mashing is obviously the longer brewday. I haven't done this yet myself, but I believe a few others here on HBT have done this with success. I also imagine that the cooler route for a bigger grain bill would work fine as I have considered this myself. But I will try the reiterated mash technique first to see if its worth my time/money to purchase a cooler for bigger grain bills. If you include rice hulls, Ive done grain bills as high as 19.25lbs in the malt-pipe and bag and sparged more. So hopefully this will help you give a sense of the "range" of the system.

Cheers1
 

NobleNewt

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This may be a dumb question, but what is everyone referring to when they say "malt pipe"? Are you talking about the actual stainless steel pipe that connects to the pump?
 

mcmeador

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This may be a dumb question, but what is everyone referring to when they say "malt pipe"? Are you talking about the actual stainless steel pipe that connects to the pump?
The basket that holds the malt when you mash.
 

Knightshade

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I am planning on brewing my first stout in the next month which will require me to go over 20lbs of grain, targeting about a ~9% abv stout. So my plan for this one is a reiterated mash technique where you mash twice, each with half the grain bill, and the second grain bill mashes uses the wort from the first mash. The drawback to reiterated mashing is obviously the longer brewday. I haven't done this yet myself, but I believe a few others here on HBT have done this with success. I also imagine that the cooler route for a bigger grain bill would work fine as I have considered this myself. But I will try the reiterated mash technique first to see if its worth my time/money to purchase a cooler for bigger grain bills. If you include rice hulls, Ive done grain bills as high as 19.25lbs in the malt-pipe and bag and sparged more. So hopefully this will help you give a sense of the "range" of the system.

Cheers1
Ummm..wow. I had assumed that most would or were just adding DME prior to boil to do anything this big.

I compiled a RIS on Brewers Friend just for S&Gs with 16.25 lbs of grain and added 2 lbs of honey and 4 lbs of DME to get it up to 11.5% ABV with a 65% projected efficiency. Feel like I was probably being too optimistic, but hey...all fun and games when you’re just making $#*@ up right?
 

Noob_Brewer

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Ummm..wow. I had assumed that most would or were just adding DME prior to boil to do anything this big.

I compiled a RIS on Brewers Friend just for S&Gs with 16.25 lbs of grain and added 2 lbs of honey and 4 lbs of DME to get it up to 11.5% ABV with a 65% projected efficiency. Feel like I was probably being too optimistic, but hey...all fun and games when you’re just making $#*@ up right?
Lol, making S**t up is the truth! Actually, I have thought about going this route for my first stout (adding DME) myself to make up for the lack of grains. One of my favorite non-BBA stouts that is always available to me is the expedition stout (bells) and their general store's recipe calls for DME/LME to get to the 10.7%ish abv that it normally has. But for my first stout, Im just trying to go a little lower so that I can relay on the grains to carry the beer and allow me to evaluate it and go from there.
 

Summa_Brewologica

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Is the perforated disc necessary for recirculation? I could understand something like that for sparging but what is the actual purpose of it for recirculating? Could one not slowly recirculate with just the tube?
 

Brewer_Dad

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Is the perforated disc necessary for recirculation? I could understand something like that for sparging but what is the actual purpose of it for recirculating? Could one not slowly recirculate with just the tube?
I don't have a disc, I recirculate just with the tube, with a very slow flow, and with an extra tube so the wort doesn't splash in the surface. I haven't had any issues.
 

cmac62

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I have been brewing for almost 7 years with 80+ 5-10 gal batches done but due to a lot of things happening in 2018-2019 I had to sell essentially all my home brewing equipment. I previously had the usual cooler, keggle, propane burner set up, but now for many reasons as I’m getting ready to get back in I want to go electric so the AF looks appealing for the price compared to any other electric system I’ve seen.

My only concern is the potential lack of “versatility” compared to my previous methods. I don’t foresee many 10 gal batches in the near future, but down the line the chances are higher. Also, I do like to do a yearly RIS or BW which may be limited to 3-4 or so gallons given the grain restraints of the AF.

So I guess my question is, would it be wiser to save up and “buy once, cry once” on a larger capacity system? Or could I use the AF as a HLT and kettle, and mash in a cooler for larger grain bill recipes?
Ive only brewed a couple of batches on my AF, but I think it is a great system for the $. As for doing an RIS or BW, you could always boost the OG with DME it 16 lbs of grain are not enough, or of course use your cooler. You can use the AF to heat the water and then as a boil kettle.

The two brews I have done I did a dunk/batch sparge with 2 gals @ 170 and ended up with almost 80% efficiency. That's plenty for me. I'm not sure I got that with my cooler MT. :mug:
 

mcmeador

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Is the perforated disc necessary for recirculation? I could understand something like that for sparging but what is the actual purpose of it for recirculating? Could one not slowly recirculate with just the tube?
I guess it could help you know if your flow is too fast. If the wort is accumulating on the disc, then you know you definitely have too high a flow.
 

Knightshade

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I don't have a disc, I recirculate just with the tube, with a very slow flow, and with an extra tube so the wort doesn't splash in the surface. I haven't had any issues.
You don't have a disc? How could you not have a disc? You just got your system??
 

LokiM4

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Is the perforated disc necessary for recirculation? I could understand something like that for sparging but what is the actual purpose of it for recirculating? Could one not slowly recirculate with just the tube?
I guess it could help you know if your flow is too fast. If the wort is accumulating on the disc, then you know you definitely have too high a flow.
In addition to flow the perforated disk helps to avoid channeling of the recirculated wort thru the grain bed. The diffusion of the pumped wort thru the holes means a slow, steady even soaking of the grains instead of a directed laminar flow that could be less efficient for conversion.
 

Summa_Brewologica

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In addition to flow the perforated disk helps to avoid channeling of the recirculated wort thru the grain bed. The diffusion of the pumped wort thru the holes means a slow, steady even soaking of the grains instead of a directed laminar flow that could be less efficient for conversion.
That makes sense but would recirculating slowly without the plate cause much channeling given the distance from the grain bed to the top of the liquid?

Like Brewer_Dad, I already have a pump and was wondering if buying that disc is a necessity. I thought about drilling some holes in copper tubing and rigging something up but I could see that clogging and becoming a disaster.
 

LokiM4

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That makes sense but would recirculating slowly without the plate cause much channeling given the distance from the grain bed to the top of the liquid?
It only serves to help mitigate the risk that it does, kind of a mechanical insurance to help. It also serves to assist in making that wort infiltration more even-with the flow out of a hose, there is a chance the direction of your flow that it’s possible that portion downstream (the direction the hose is pointed) could be more washed than the portion behind the hose is. Yes a small depth of wort over the grainbed may help even that out but that directed flow from the hose could still effect things negatively to some extent.
 

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This got mentioned a few pages back but are there any good still attachments people are using? I have the 6.5 kit with pump but am considering adding a 10.5 w/o pump to brew up some bigger batches of wash. Also need to start distilling my own water for my espresso machine.
 

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Tapped the Kolsh yesterday. Even with messing up the default boil time in beer smith {let’s just say I brewed a kolsh light ) it came out superb. Nice to mix things up with a beer that isn’t in your face hopped every once in a while. Don’t get me wrong, I love my hopped up IPAs. I enjoy the change of pace of a kolsh






27A35569-4048-4E0B-95B1-8D36D9AEBB21.jpeg
 

NSMikeD

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This got mentioned a few pages back but are there any good still attachments people are using? I have the 6.5 kit with pump but am considering adding a 10.5 w/o pump to brew up some bigger batches of wash. Also need to start distilling my own water for my espresso machine.
a RODI system might make a better solution for your espresso. It’s common in saltwater reef tank hobby and for home brewers with very hard water. Plus if you like dialing in your own water profiles rodi provides a clean slate. I have an under $100 system I hook up to my washing machine spigot and make 5gals of rodi water ( 0 TDS) in an hour.
 

Summa_Brewologica

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a RODI system might make a better solution for your espresso. It’s common in saltwater reef tank hobby and for home brewers with very hard water. Plus if you like dialing in your own water profiles rodi provides a clean slate. I have an under $100 system I hook up to my washing machine spigot and make 5gals of rodi water ( 0 TDS) in an hour.
Where did you find one under $100? I just started looking at RO systems this morning and just about pulled the trigger on a $175 one and that is without the DI. I thought that was cheap, until reading your post.

That beer looks incredibly tasty, btw.
 

Jsmith2154

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a RODI system might make a better solution for your espresso. It’s common in saltwater reef tank hobby and for home brewers with very hard water. Plus if you like dialing in your own water profiles rodi provides a clean slate. I have an under $100 system I hook up to my washing machine spigot and make 5gals of rodi water ( 0 TDS) in an hour.
Well I've been using store bought distilled and doing very simple SCA profile from there. Doing more to help prevent scaling than worry about taste profiles. "washing machine spigot" so you're collecting your waste water? That's awesome!
 

NobleNewt

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Where did you find one under $100? I just started looking at RO systems this morning and just about pulled the trigger on a $175 one and that is without the DI. I thought that was cheap, until reading your post.

That beer looks incredibly tasty, btw.
Look at APEC on Amazon. I’ve got the ROES-50? I think? Works a treat for coffee and drinking water. I still get 5 gallons of water for brew days.
 

Summa_Brewologica

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Look at APEC on Amazon. I’ve got the ROES-50? I think? Works a treat for coffee and drinking water. I still get 5 gallons of water for brew days.
I might just go with that. I was looking at the iSpring. I suppose anything in that price range would do.
 
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