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  1. McKnuckle

    BIAB newbie with low OG

    A typical boil-off rate with a keggle (I assume that's what you mean by keg?) is 1 to 1.5 gallons per hour. Check out the spreadsheet on this BIAB Tools page to see how the volume variables interact. Check out some other software, like the recipe builder on BrewersFriend.com, to see how to...
  2. McKnuckle

    BIAB newbie with low OG

    Well, you may not wish to count the volume of wort that contained sediment, but unfortunately the recipe does. :) That extra volume means you either boiled off less wort than expected, or you simply started with too much water, which I think is the case here. You've listed 9.25 lbs of malt...
  3. McKnuckle

    BIAB newbie with low OG

    A relatively fine grind helps maximize BIAB efficiency. If you had the grains milled at a homebrew shop, they are notorious for milling in a "middle of the road" sort of way. That could be one factor. The next factor is simply the method by which you are predicting those OG values. How much...
  4. McKnuckle

    Acidulated malt in stouts and water adjustment

    Here's some write-up on techniques to add it later - in this case, at packaging. Note: I have never done this myself. Dry Irish Stout
  5. McKnuckle

    Acidulated malt in stouts and water adjustment

    I'm pretty sure that Guinness adds their infamously secret "twang" after the mash. And so should you. That way the extra acid won't mess with your mash pH. The recipes you've seen are probably overlooking that approach.
  6. McKnuckle

    Adding fruit to secondary fermentation

    The yeast will wake right up. It’s like the smell of bacon frying in the kitchen when you’re sleeping late on the weekend. Irresistible!
  7. McKnuckle

    Corny keg pressure

    Unless you have exacting needs that require different levels of carbonation for each beer, it is fine to hook everything up to one regulator. I assume you have a manifold so you can do that.
  8. McKnuckle

    Corny keg pressure

    The red numbers on the gauge at the bottom/right indicate the regulated pressure sent to the keg(s). Ignore the dial on the left; it is basically useless.
  9. McKnuckle

    Corny keg pressure

    I assume that hydro photo is the lager; if so, at 1.010 after two weeks it is 99% done. Go ahead and put it in your keg. In fact, if you are exposing it to air at all, that's bad so you should package it ASAP.
  10. McKnuckle

    Adding fruit to secondary fermentation

    I'm not a fruit beer person, but I have made my share of fruit wine in the past. For mango, I guess I would peel and section it into chunks, removing the pit of course. Then I would freeze, thaw, and mash. I might be impatient and just mash it, though. :) Do consider how you're getting it...
  11. McKnuckle

    Corny keg pressure

    The simplest and most reliable way to carbonate beer in a keg is to hook up the CO2 and set the regulator to serving pressure. Serving pressure will be in the 12 psi range. You can start there and see how it goes. It will take 2 weeks to carbonate, but it will be somewhat carbed in half that...
  12. McKnuckle

    Best BIAB types to start with?

    Read the older, web-based version of How to Brew while you wait for the book. Don't focus so much on the equipment, because that changes, and the book doesn't cover newer electric brewing systems. Focus on the basics of how the craft is practiced. In fact, the equipment section is useful...
  13. McKnuckle

    Adding fruit to secondary fermentation

    Fermentation will be over when all of the fermentable sugars in the ingredients, both malt and fruit, are consumed by the yeast. Yeast don't operate on a schedule. In all practicality, the fruit will probably be done fermenting in a week or less. But you'll need to confirm that with a...
  14. McKnuckle

    Best BIAB types to start with?

    You don't need a bag with the Foundry. It has a basket (malt pipe) for that. You also don't need yeast nutrient, and you don't need to make a starter with dry yeast. Starters are for situations where you do not have enough healthy yeast for the volume and/or gravity of the wort. Dried yeast...
  15. McKnuckle

    Recreating a long lost memeory

    I think the grain bill sounds good for a start, even if it may have a couple more specialty grains than strictly needed. For example, the color in many traditional Belgian recipes comes at least partly from sugar that has been caramelized to different degrees. Sugar is a big part of these...
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