YOUR Experience With Using Moldy Rhizomes?

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Ordered some rhizomes about a month ago and haven't been able to get to plant them until recently due to unforeseen personal issues. They were received in good order and stored in a cool fridge since arrival but 1 month later 4/6 have exhibited white growth, 1/6 with blue green growth, and 1 that appears clean. I hesitate to call it mold due to Northern Brewer's info. I found this on Northern Brewer's site:

"Rhizomes are shipped moist so they do not dry out and unfortunately mold may form. Luckily, this does not mean the rhizomes are ruined; in fact, these rhizomes may even be healthier than most (see below). Many seeds and hardier plants can be treated with bleach solutions to kill the spores, but don’t do this to your rhizomes – they are too sensitive to the hypochloric acid in bleach.

One important point of interest is that many roots, like rhizomes, may have white colored ‘mold-like’ growths on them. This is not mold but actually symbiotic bacteria that assist the plant in converting free nitrogen into usable forms. The growths are not thick, should be white to off white (green/blue is most likely a mold) and should converge into concentrated areas of varying size called a nodule. These rhizomes are sort of like winning the lottery as these rhizomes theoretically will have a competitive advantage because nitrogen is one of three important macronutrients. True molds on roots have also been shown to offer similar advantages to many different plants. The rhizomes – the part of the plant that helps the plant survive from year to year – are actually rather resilient to moderate stress and as long as they are afforded the care any rhizome deserves should produce a healthy plant, whether there is mold or not."

What is everyone's experience with the information above and planting moldy rhizomes? Is it worth trying or should all new rhizomes be bought? Is there any truth to the "hardiness" or do you see them grow with downey mildew issues? I believe that was the cause of my stunted Centennial last year: Downy Mildew.

Advice/experience appreciated :mug:
 

B-Hoppy

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As long as they're still firm, a little 'fuzz' on the cut ends is nothing to worry about. Just don't overwater them starting out and you should be golden!
 

kilohertz

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As long as they're still firm, a little 'fuzz' on the cut ends is nothing to worry about. Just don't overwater them starting out and you should be golden!
Agreed. I was given a big root ball of Golding, got it home and split it into 6 plants and a few rhizomes and planted in pots temporarily. 2 weeks later finally got around to planting in the ground and a couple of the small root chunks had mold on them, I was over watering and the soil was very heavy. Planted them anyway and 2 days later they broke ground and are doing fine. You should be okay, just don't over water them, let them dry out a bit in their new home.

Cheers
 

Pelikan

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Look into a biofungicide like Bontanicare AquaShield. Worth its weight in gold. Establishes a colony of beneficial microbes at the root zone. Haven't had to contend with any sort of fungus or mold in the garden since I first started using it.

Blue Green mold is the fruiting stage of trichoderma and generally means the underlying tissue is dead or dying.
 

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