You know what pisses me off? SAME-DIFFERENCE!

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kornkob

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donner said:
'Between the two of us' is another phrase that gets me. It's redundant. "Between" by definition involves two people, things etc. If it's three or more you move to among. There is no need for the 'two of us' on the end of the phrase because between takes care of the numbers involved.
I think your assumption that between only refers to a duality is a flawed assumtion.

Example of non-duality usage:
Joe, John and Jane all looked in their piggy banks and they had $5.19 between them.

Between Josie, Janet and Jack covering the goals, we never had a chance.



American Heritage Dictionary - Cite This Source - Share This be·tween
(bĭ-twēn') Pronunciation Key
prep.
    1. In or through the position or interval separating: between the trees; between 11 o'clock and 12 o'clock.
    2. Intermediate to, as in quantity, amount, or degree: It costs between 15 and 20 dollars.
    3. By the combined effort or effect of: Between them they succeeded.
    4. In the combined ownership of: They had only a few dollars between them.
  1. Usage Problem Connecting spatially: a railroad between the two cities.
  2. Usage Problem Associating or uniting in a reciprocal action or relationship: an agreement between workers and management; a certain resemblance between the two stories.
  3. In confidence restricted to: Between you and me, he is not qualified.
    1. By the combined effort or effect of: Between them they succeeded.
    2. In the combined ownership of: They had only a few dollars between them.
  4. As measured against. Often used to express a reciprocal relationship: choose between riding and walking.
 

Donner

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kornkob said:
I think your assumption that between only refers to a duality is a flawed assumtion.

Example of non-duality usage:
Joe, John and Jane all looked in their piggy banks and they had $5.19 between them.

Between Josie, Janet and Jack covering the goals, we never had a chance.



American Heritage Dictionary - Cite This Source - Share This be·tween
(bĭ-twēn') Pronunciation Key
prep.
    1. In or through the position or interval separating: between the trees; between 11 o'clock and 12 o'clock.
    2. Intermediate to, as in quantity, amount, or degree: It costs between 15 and 20 dollars.
    3. By the combined effort or effect of: Between them they succeeded.
    4. In the combined ownership of: They had only a few dollars between them.
  1. Usage Problem Connecting spatially: a railroad between the two cities.
  2. Usage Problem Associating or uniting in a reciprocal action or relationship: an agreement between workers and management; a certain resemblance between the two stories.
  3. In confidence restricted to: Between you and me, he is not qualified.
    1. By the combined effort or effect of: Between them they succeeded.
    2. In the combined ownership of: They had only a few dollars between them.
  4. As measured against. Often used to express a reciprocal relationship: choose between riding and walking.
I perhaps wasn't elaborate enough in my example and too specific in my statement. I am, however, correct, as are you.
Associated Press Style Guide said:
Among, between: The maxim that between introduces two items and among introduces more than two covers most questions about how to use these words: The funds were divided among Ford, Carter and McCarthy.

However, between is the correct word when expressing the relationships of three or more items considered one pair at a time: Negotiations on a debate format are under way between the network and the Ford, Carter and McCarthy committees.

As with all prepositions, any pronouns that follow these words must be in the objective case: among us, between him and her, between you and me.
 

srm775

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donner said:
Hmm, where to start...

In sports when people say one team OVER another team. Really? Over/under denotes a physical relationship. You can hop over someone, or be under the table. You beat another team, or better yet, WIN.
I agree with you on this one, but over vs. more than is often technically correct. What you're forgetting is the role of metaphor in language.

donner said:
People incorrectly using 'due to'. You were not late to work 'due to' your car not starting, you were late because your car didn't start. 'Due' is used for money.
Not sure where you learned that "due to" was only used for money, but it's not. It is correctly used when it can be replace or be replaced by "caused by." As in: The baseball game's postponment was due to rain.

Hope this makes things very, very clear. ;)
 

EdWort

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I really hate when people begin a sentence with "To be honest with you" or "To tell you the Truth".

Both simply imply that normally you are a lying bastich and just this time, you are going outside your normal M.O.
 

AFAJ Brew Guy

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The three things that really get to me are:

Gonna instead of going to. Is it really that hard to say going to?

Another one is when people do not put the "g" in the "ing". As in interestin or somethin.

The other, and know that this out there a lot, is when companies say that a product is new and improved. How in the fk can some thing be new and improved? If it is improved, it isn't new, there had to be something to improve in the first place.
 

Moonshae

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As an editor, I have to add my pet peeve to this.

When people add a qualifier to "unique." Either something is unique, one of a kind, or not. It can't be very unique, or somewhat unique. It's unique or it isn't.

I guess I have more than one, another is when people pronounce the 't' in often. It's properly pronounced "of-en"...the 't' is silent.
 

cd2448

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universal panacea?

i don't know about often - source i just found on the web says with or without t is ok. i miss a good few of those "g"s in ing so i'm not on the moral high ground here.

the thing that drives me very insane is when people get you're/your their/they're mixed up. even if i do it myself sometimes, other people shouldn't.
 

PeteOz77

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How about "Save up to 50%.. and MORE!"

How much more? 3% more? then why not say "Save up to 53%!"

I also hate it when people say "Can I ask you a question?" I always answer with "You mean two questions? Because you already asked me one"
 

PeteOz77

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cd2448 said:
The thing that drives me very insane is when people get you're/your their/they're mixed up. even if i do it myself sometimes, other people shouldn't.

I HATE it when people us an apostrophe where there shouldn't be one.. like in "Inventory Clearance! All Car's Must Go!" Even worse is when you see it in neon.
 

Barley-Davidson

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Same difference doesn't bother me.

At the end of the day and not for nothing both make my eyes throb with aggravation.

At the end of the day because of overuse; not for nothing because it doesn't make any sense.

One more - the proof is in the pudding

The expression is the proof of the pudding is in the eating, which makes sense - somehow it got shortened to the proof is in the pudding, which doesn't mean anything.

OK, all done now
 

bobjenkins79

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I work in a clinic. On the registration sheet there is a line that says, "What is the reason for your visit?" I would like to kill every f-tard that writes "sick".

No $hit pal, WHAT ARE YOUR SYMPTOMS?!?!?!?!?

I also hate it when people say they "need to be seen." I'm not really sure why it pisses me off so much, but it sure does.
 

cheezydemon

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Has irregardless been mentioned here? *f()cking retards*

The ultimate Moronic statement ever.

From the movie AIRPLANE :
"The Hospital????What is it?????"
"Well it's a large building with doctors and nurses"

My old boss when he would try to quote it:

"WHAT"S A HOSPITAL????? BWAAAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA" and he would bellow with laughter like "what's a hospital" made any sense or was in any way funny. He did this all the fing time.
 
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Ahh, I see it's rant time. Excellent.

I hate teenage girls that say "like" 10 times in a 20 word statement. Also sports figures saying "Like I said" all the time in interviews. Both I believe are used in replace of the non-word "uuhhmmmmm" to give their brains time to think on what they're trying to say.

Wow, like I said, I feel, like, better now.
 

TexLaw

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PeteOz77 said:
I also hate it when people say "Can I ask you a question?" I always answer with "You mean two questions? Because you already asked me one"
That one does not bother me at all. In fact, I find it quite polite and even considerate. It is similar, nearly equivalent to asking for a moment of your time. Would answer "you mean another moment after this one?"


TL
 

cheezydemon

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TexLaw said:
That one does not bother me at all. In fact, I find it quite polite and even considerate. It is similar, nearly equivalent to asking for a moment of your time. Would answer "you mean another moment after this one?"


TL
I agree. Irregardless of how, like, stupid the next question may be. Like I said.
 

PeteOz77

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TexLaw said:
That one does not bother me at all. In fact, I find it quite polite and even considerate. It is similar, nearly equivalent to asking for a moment of your time. Would answer "you mean another moment after this one?"


TL

Depending on who was asking.... Yes, I might reply "you mean another moment after this one?"
 

Brewing Clamper

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PeteOz77 said:
How about "Save up to 50%.. and MORE!"

How much more? 3% more? then why not say "Save up to 53%!"
That's funny. There's an ad down in Southern Califonia for an auto dealer that boasts: "100% of those who qualify will be approved!!"
 

malkore

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irregardless of the actual topic here...

I'm tired of everyone mis-using 'impact'.

"It impacted us in a negative way" - no...that's wrong!

and now its been misused so much, its becoming ok to use it like that.

arrrgh!
 
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