Yogurt pasteurized/organic?

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Nomofett

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Hi, I want to do a kettle sour but I have one quick question. If I'm using yogurt does it have to be unpasteurized and/or organic?

I live in a country where I don't know how to read labels so this may be hard. And please don't respond with something like "just use Nancy's yogurt" because I don't have the same brands over here as back in the states.

Thanks!
 

TandemTails

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Not being able to read the labels will make it tougher, but as long as it has live cultures it should be ok. Go with the non-fat kind if you can. If you can see anything along the lines of "L. Bulgaricus, S. Thermophilus, L. Acidophilus, Bifidus, L. Casei" or the word Lactobacillus then i think you should be ok. I'm assuming those bacteria names won't be translated to whatever language you're reading from.
 

Kent88

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You want yogurt from milk that was pasteurized, but there should be no pasteurization since it became yogurt. Unless you have money to just throw away, ignore the "organic" stuff, too.
 

Schlenkerla

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Yes definitely yogurt that has active cultures. Possibly pasteurized milk but not the yogurt. Yogurt is predominantly sold as a probiotic so the yogurt should have live or active cultures. Only the milk would be pasteurized.... (Its twice that I hand to correct my milf spelling for milk - my mind is in the gutter due to sleep deprivation.)

Can you take a friend with you to pick out your yogurt who's fluent?

If not, try this... and bring a smart phone with google translator to the store.


https://translate.google.com/#auto/lb/active cultures

active cultures in;

Luxembourgish - aktiv Kulturen (Ha - Didn't Know Luxembourg had its own language - :D)

Korean - 활성 문화

Azerbaijani - aktiv mədəniyyətlər

Punjabi - ਸਰਗਰਮ ਸਭਿਆਚਾਰ

Lactobacillus; Its latin so its almost universal unless you don't have the same alphabet,

https://translate.google.com/#auto/ru/Lactobacillus

Russian - лактобацилла
Tamil - லாக்டோபாகிலஸ்
Yiddish - לאַקטאָבאַסיללוס
 
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Nomofett

Nomofett

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Thanks, I'm in Japan so translate is pretty workable here.

They have done Greek yogurt at the store near me so I'll just give that a shot.

Thanks for the help everyone!

Also I like that Luxembourg's language is kinda Luxembourg, it's just Luxembourg-ish
 
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Nomofett

Nomofett

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Thanks for the help. Just thought I'd update. I'm bottling this weekend and I just took a sample and so far it's great. It's a tropical sour Pale.
I just used some Danone Bio (maybe it's called Activia in the states) I'll update more later
 

Kent88

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Wow, you're bottling already? I thought that with sours the brewer should wait a while because the bacteria ferment out the more complicated sugars slowly. Are the bacteria from the yogurt still going? Will you be using less priming sugar?
 
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Nomofett

Nomofett

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With traditional sours that's the case, but the beautiful thing with kettle souring is that you sour the wort before you do the boil and then make it like a regular beer, much quicker and easier.

That's also why I was able to make it a Pale also (traditional sours and hops don't get along)
 

Kent88

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With traditional sours that's the case, but the beautiful thing with kettle souring is that you sour the wort before you do the boil and then make it like a regular beer, much quicker and easier.
My mistake, I overlooked that this was a kettle sour. :smack:

I've made a berliner weisse by kettle souring, it got a lot better with a couple months of aging. When I tried it a couple weeks after bottling I thought I would end up dumping it.
 
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Nomofett

Nomofett

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That's good to know, I was gonna drink this as fresh as possible cause it's really hoppy, but I'll be sure to keep a few bottles a few months as a test
 
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