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Yet another 'Did I ruin' thread

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Scrow

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So I brewed my first batch today, and I pitched the yeast about 5-6 hours ago. I have not noticed any activity in the airlock at all (I know the airlock is just an airlock, but still). Should I be concerned? Does it usually take longer than this? Should I repitch yeast?
 

Revvy

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So I brewed my first batch today, and I pitched the yeast about 5-6 hours ago. I have not noticed any activity in the airlock at all (I know the airlock is just an airlock, but still). Should I be concerned? Does it usually take longer than this? Should I repitch yeast?
It's not a matter of "But Still" when we say ignore the airlock we mean, for just this reason...it's NOT A RELIABLE INDICATOR.

But first...when we say that https://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/fermentation-can-take-24-72-hrs-show-visible-signs-43635/ we mean that as well.....fermentation can take up to 72 hours to begin.....it's called lag time...

Back to the "but still" airlock situation...Read this.

https://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/fi...questions-106432/?highlight=cheap#post1170162

And as to what to do After 72 hours Read this as well...

http://blogs.homebrewtalk.com/Revvy/Think_evaluation_before_action/

Don't think about fixing something, just because YOU think somethings wrong....The only thing wrong is that you have noobitus....not that there's anything wrong with your beer....it's behaving normally...

 
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Scrow

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Well I just checked. Nothing still, but the pantry where I am keeping it is about 64-65 degrees. Sadly it is the only room that can stay a constant temperature. Is there anything I can do to increase the temperature in there? I don't suppose wrapping the bucket or something would work?
 

rsmith179

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They do sell "Brew Belts" online and probably at your LHBS as well. You may want to consider picking up one of those and thowing it on the bucket for the entire primary phase. Again, this is really nothing to worry about though. As Revvy said, it can take anywhere from 24-48 hours for bubbling to start going through your airlock. I would just wait it out for the next 1-2 days to see if any bubbling has started on the primary.
 
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Scrow

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I am just concerned that being 5 to 6 degrees colder than it should be it going to drastically slow the process. It's my first brew, I am ready to drink it now!
 

Corkster

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My buddy and I both brewed up the exact same recipe for our first brew... we both started within a couple days of each other.... I had airlock activity after four or five hours, he had no activity after 24 hours.... turned out he did not have a good tight seal on his bucket lid....
 

Dennis1979

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I don't think I have ever seen airlock activity in 5 - 6 hours. I would be more worried about seeing activity that quick than not seeing it. Do something to get your mind off of it and check it this time tomorrow, you will see something going on and you can sit there and watch the bubbles.

I don't know what kind of yeast you used but most of the ones I use recommend the wort to be in the 70 to 75 degree range for yeast pitching and fermentation start (ale yeast). If your wort was the proper temp when you pitched, it will stay that temp for plenty long enough to start the fermentation. The point being that the current room temperature is not that important right now as long as you pitched with the wort at the right temp. By tomorrow when you can see evidence of fermentation, the wort temp will come down relative to the room temp but will likely be about 5 degrees warmer than room temp.

See this post for more info on temp control https://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/temp-control-106838/

Dennis
 

irunxcjm

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Your 64-65 degrees is fine. The fermentation process will heat up the beer. You will be just fine. Just chill out and forget about it for at least a week.
 

jmiracle

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I wish I had a place I could keep beer at 64 right now, my apartment is always at least 70 through ambient heat (top floor) even in the middle of winter.

The beer will be fine just chillax and welcome to the obsession
 
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Scrow

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Thanks guys. Only last... issue. I may have pitched the yeast a little too warm. I think the wort was around 80 or so. SWMBO was becoming very impatient to go to dinner. What is a safe range for yeast?
 
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Scrow

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Ok. How high is "too high" just to feed my own curiosity?
 
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Depends on the yeast, Read the packet it came in. It gives you the range for that particular yeast strain.

Is it fermenting yet? If not surely it's ruined.

Sorry I'm joking. RELAX!!!!!!!!
 
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Scrow

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Ok, good deal. In any case, if worse comes to worse and the yeast didn't make it, I guess (after doing all the checking first) I can just repitch yeast so it's not a big deal.

Also, I learned a lot about what to do differently next time. Like be prepared with much more ice. And be more patient before pitching yeast!
 

duridsr4fite

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As someone who just went through the same freak-out mental process on my first batch a couple months ago, relax. My fermentation didn't show any noticeable signs for 3 days. I was sure i pitched too hot, was infected with some super-bug that ate all of my yeast, or just sucked at brewing. I am now drinking my first batch and it came out fine. I also had some temp issues, but apparently, it had no effects, as the beer that came out was close to commercial quality.

<----still has noobitus
 

Revvy

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As someone who just went through the same freak-out mental process on my first batch a couple months ago, relax. My fermentation didn't show any noticeable signs for 3 days. I was sure i pitched too hot, was infected with some super-bug that ate all of my yeast, or just sucked at brewing. I am now drinking my first batch and it came out fine. I also had some temp issues, but apparently, it had no effects, as the beer that came out was close to commercial quality.

<----still has noobitus
actually...I think you have passed noob status by already purely by your answer.

:mug:
 
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