Yeasty smell after primary fermentation

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chrismacomber

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This is my first post and would appreciate any feedback, thoughts and experiences that other brewers have had. Thanks!

Anyway, Ive brewed about five all grain batches and am still pretty inexperienced. I've been using Safale dry yeast (mainly US 05) and haven't had any problembs to this point. However, the last two times I've brewed the yeast has gone straight to the bottom of the carboy immediately following the pitch. Fermentation has started within 24 hours and had a normal 7 to 10 day fermentation cycle with a healthy krausen but the beer smells extremely yeasty and just plain bad after the primary fermentation. There's also been some very small ball looking yeast (my guess is yeast that didn't rehydrate for some reason) still floating on the top after final gravity was reached. I transfered the first batch and dry hopped it for a couple of weeks. It did a good job of covering up the smell and it tastes pretty good. However, there's still a hint of the smell. The second batch is still in the primary fermentor but the bottle I pulled just after the pitch to do gravity readings smells the same as the last batch. I'm planning on giving it the dry hop treatment too so we'll see how it turns out.

Lastly, the yeast had been rehydrated both times and the expiration date isn't until early 2013.

Again, thanks for any help you may have to offer!
 

Yooper

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It's probably just fine, but make sure you check the temperature before you add the yeast because a too-warm pitching temp and a too-warm fermentation temperature could cause those yeasty flavors and aromas.

Make sure you chill your wort to the mid-60s before adding the yeast, and keep it under 74 degrees (for that yeast strain) always. It's usually better if you can keep it at 65-68 degrees. I mean the temperature of the beer, which is often warmer than ambient because fermentation itself produces heat.
 
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chrismacomber

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Thanks for the thoughts guys. I'm pretty sure It's not temerature related. I have a nice wort chiller and always get my beer down in the 60s before pitching and keep it below 70 during fermentation.

Also, I racked the second batch to the secondary last night and this time it smelled fine. I think the lesson learned here was patience!!

Thanks again.
 
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