Yeast washing on starters from dregs

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Rzlblrt417

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So I have been recovery yeast from cans of beer that I enjoy and are of a similar style of the beer that I want to make. This process involves me doing a .5, 1, 1.5, and two or three 2 liter starters before I end up with around 600 billion that i split into jars and use for a batch.

My question is, should i wash the yeast once or twice while climbing this latter? and if so how should I do it. I thought it would be best to take the starter that is done and then leave it in the fridge for 30-60 min, then pouring that liquid into a mason jar and letting it settle before decanting and doing a new starter.

What do you guys think?
 

kh54s10

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I don't know the cell counts but I freeze yeast. 5ml per vial. I have done quite a few 5 gallon beers from them and some were over 2 years saved. I did a .25 liter starter of 1.020 wort, added .5 liters of 1.040, decanted and did a 2 liter starter, (or the size needed for the beer guessing a fresh package worth of yeast) decanted and pitched. I had activity on all of them in less than 12 hours. And the beers turned out great.

IMO, using DME and no hops does not create enough trub that it is worth the effort or risk to wash the yeast at all.
 
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Rzlblrt417

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I don't know the cell counts but I freeze yeast. 5ml per vial. I have done quite a few 5 gallon beers from them and some were over 2 years saved. I did a .25 liter starter of 1.020 wort, added .5 liters of 1.040, decanted and did a 2 liter starter, (or the size needed for the beer guessing a fresh package worth of yeast) decanted and pitched. I had activity on all of them in less than 12 hours. And the beers turned out great.

IMO, using DME and no hops does not create enough trub that it is worth the effort or risk to wash the yeast at all.
Thats what I was figuring.

But there is no risk of having dead yeast in there? I am assuming that as I go through this long process some yeast die but look like they are adding to the yeast count
 

kh54s10

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I have never heard that dead yeast is of any concern. If it was it would require washing any yeast you would use. A fresh package contains dead yeast that increase with age. That is what viability is all about. 50% viability means that 50% of the original cell count is dead. Or conversely 50% are still alive.
 
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