Yeast substitution

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BurlingBrew

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I am looking to brew John Palmer's "Port O' Palmer" recipe from How to Brew and it says to use Wyeast 1056 American Ale. I would like to substitute that for WLP 013 London Ale because that's what I have on hand (harvested it fresh from a starter from my last batch) Would anyone be reluctant in doing so and for what reasons?

Thanks in advance. :rockin:
 

kh54s10

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American hops and American yeast to be true to the recipe... But in the all grain version he lists British Pale Ale Malt as an option so London ale yeast seems in line. Go for it.
 
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BurlingBrew

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American hops and American yeast to be true to the recipe... But in the all grain version he lists British Pale Ale Malt as an option so London ale yeast seems in line. Go for it.
Recipe in my book (not sure what edition) list's 8.5 lbs of pale ale malt. I was just about to order 2 row. Should I substitute my base grain knowing I will be using the WLP 013?
 

kh54s10

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Recipe in my book (not sure what edition) list's 8.5 lbs of pale ale malt. I was just about to order 2 row. Should I substitute my base grain knowing I will be using the WLP 013?
Most pale ale malts have a bit more flavor/maltiness than basic 2 row. I don't usually worry too much about which to use. But, that said British Pale ale malt will give a little more depth to the flavor.
 
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BurlingBrew

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Most pale ale malts have a bit more flavor/maltiness than basic 2 row. I don't usually worry too much about which to use. But, that said British Pale ale malt will give a little more depth to the flavor.
Maybe a dumb questions but is Maris Otter similar to a British pale ale malt? I can't seem to find any British from my supply source.

Back to the original question, if i want to stay true to the style then I should use american malt with american yeast and vice versa. That being said you do not have any concerns with using london ale yeast with this recipe? Maybe I'm overthinking this....:drunk:
 

kh54s10

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From the internet: Maris Otter is an English two-row "winter" variety of barley, commonly used in the production of malt for the brewing industry. So I would say it is not technically a British Pale Ale malt which would be a bit darker and maltier. I don't have concerns with substitutions (within a range) I made some of my best by taking a recipe and using what I had on hand that was close. Changing the yeast will make the beer different. But it will be good barring no other issues.
 
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BurlingBrew

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Thanks for your feedback! I think i'll end up sticking with the 2 row (less expensive) and use my London Yeast.
 

chickypad

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As mentioned Maris otter is the type of barley, it can be kilned to different levels just the way domestic 2-row barley can. Typically what is sold as "2-row" is kilned in the 1.7-2.0 L range, and the same barley kilned to 3-4 L range is sold as domestic pale ale malt. Crisp makes an Extra Pale Maris Otter that is listed as 1.5-1.9 and their regular Maris Otter at 2.5-4.0. Most of the Maris otter I see sold in the US is kilned in that 3-4 L range, which should fall under the more generic term of British pale ale malt. If you want to go with a cheaper domestic malt I would try to use domestic pale ale malt rather than 2 row as a sub.
 
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