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DeRoux's Broux

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Has anyone ever used lager yeast at ale temperatures? I was wondering what the differences would be in flavor, lag time, etc. I don't know if it makes a difference, but I keg and force carbonate my brews.

Cheers!
 

The Professor

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Anchor Steam (california common) is made by using a lager yeast at ale temps. It gives the beer a bit more fruitiness than if lagered but the result can be quite pleasing. I usually use San Francisco lager yeast when I make my Steam beers and they turn out quite nice. So.....I guess to answer your question:Yes, I do it all the time, and it turns out great. I even went so far as to make a Steam Stout (Beer purists are rolling over in their graves) and I'm not going to apologize for it!
 
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DeRoux's Broux

DeRoux's Broux

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Thanks Professor for the follow-up. I guess I should have been a little more specific. I had read about the California Common in the recent BYO, and knew about Anchor Steam (from several sessions!) But, Anchor Steam is a hoppy beer to me, which hides some of the characteristics of the beer. I want to brew a Texas style bock, but use lager yeast. I know I could use a German Ale yeast, but wanted to see if anyone had done anything similar. I guess I need to just give it a shot and see what happens? Also, does the primary and secondary fermentation last about the same time as when using the ale yeast?

Thanks again.







The Professor said:
Anchor Steam (california common) is made by using a lager yeast at ale temps. It gives the beer a bit more fruitiness than if lagered but the result can be quite pleasing. I usually use San Francisco lager yeast when I make my Steam beers and they turn out quite nice. So.....I guess to answer your question:Yes, I do it all the time, and it turns out great. I even went so far as to make a Steam Stout (Beer purists are rolling over in their graves) and I'm not going to apologize for it!
 

NUCC98

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My yeast question is what the real difference is between using liquid yeast vis a vis dry? I read it's really a matter of convenience over taste to use the dry...is this true? Thanks!!!
 

rdlamb2

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NUCC98 said:
My yeast question is what the real difference is between using liquid yeast vis a vis dry? I read it's really a matter of convenience over taste to use the dry...is this true? Thanks!!!
Liquid becomes more active sooner. The sooner the process begins the less likely bacteria can get a start. I only use liquid yeast.
 

NUCC98

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rdlamb2 said:
Liquid becomes more active sooner. The sooner the process begins the less likely bacteria can get a start. I only use liquid yeast.

Thanks for the reply! Do you still get the haze after fermentation when you use liquid?
 

Janx

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Using liquid yeast is one of the single best things I did to improve the quality of my beer. I really don't think that the dry yeasts produce as clean a ferment as the liquid.

Add to that the fact that you have an endless amount of diversity and fun styles to play with.

Liquid yeast. Raging big starters. Then you got good beer. :D

Janx
 
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