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yeast question. First brew today.

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Willsellout

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So I bought a kit at a local store and it came with brewers yeast. It doesn't say anything else on it and it is a 15 gram packet. Is this fine for a brown ale?
And do I use the whole packet? Also I was going to create a starter before I actually started brewing. I was going to pitch it in a pint of water that was boiled beforehand. I will put it in at around 70 degrees just like I would the wort. How much time do I need to create a starter and once I put the yeast in? And do I keep it out on the counter while I brew or in a dark place or any other specifics?

Thanks

Dan
 

Walker

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Willsellout said:
So I bought a kit at a local store and it came with brewers yeast. It doesn't say anything else on it and it is a 15 gram packet. Is this fine for a brown ale?
And do I use the whole packet? Also I was going to create a starter before I actually started brewing. I was going to pitch it in a pint of water that was boiled beforehand. I will put it in at around 70 degrees just like I would the wort. How much time do I need to create a starter and once I put the yeast in? And do I keep it out on the counter while I brew or in a dark place or any other specifics?

Thanks

Dan
if the yeast came with a "brown ale" kit, then it's ale yeast and will work fine.

Yes, use the whole packet.

Finally, what you describe doing with the yeast is re-hydrating, not making a starter. A starter (not really needed with dry yeast) is usually done 1 or 2 days before you brew. You basically make a miniature batch of beer when you make a starter, which results in a LOT of yeast being produced. Then on your brew day you dump the whole cake of yeast into your full batch of wort.

With dry yeast, you can rehydrate after you start your boil to allow it to get wetted nicely.

Near the end of your boil, you can PROOF the yeast by spooning some of your wort into the re-hydrated yeast. It should start bubbling and foaming by the time you are ready to toss it into your wort.

You do not need to keep rehydrated yeast in a dark place. Just keep it in the 70-80 degree range, in a sanitized container, and cover it with foil or plastic wrap until you are ready to pitch it into the wort.
 
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Willsellout

Willsellout

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Walker-san said:
if the yeast came with a "brown ale" kit, then it's ale yeast and will work fine.

Yes, use the whole packet.

Finally, what you describe doing with the yeast is re-hydrating, not making a starter. A starter (not really needed with dry yeast) is usually done 1 or 2 days before you brew. You basically make a miniature batch of beer when you make a starter, which results in a LOT of yeast being produced. Then on your brew day you dump the whole cake of yeast into your full batch of wort.

With dry yeast, you can rehydrate after you start your boil to allow it to get wetted nicely.

Near the end of your boil, you can PROOF the yeast by spooning some of your wort into the re-hydrated yeast. It should start bubbling and foaming by the time you are ready to toss it into your wort.

You do not need to keep rehydrated yeast in a dark place. Just keep it in the 70-80 degree range.
OK great...I got my terms mixed up. It came with a kit but not a brown ale kit. I got an amber extract syrup and this packet of yeast and 2 oz of hops. It wasn't a specific type Ale/Lager etc.. I just don't want my first batch to come out crappy:)


Dan
 
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Willsellout

Willsellout

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Passload said:
Most all yeast that come in any kit will be an ale yeast. Nottingham or very similar.

Cheers!
Justin
Cool thanks, everything is under way. Steeping the grains right now. Cleaned and sanitized everything. Now I'm just chilling out having a Hefe and listening to some good music and I'm also documenting with plenty of pics.


Dan
 

Reverend JC

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I was told just the other day that if re-hydrating dry yeast you should only let it go with out being pitched or proofed for a max of 15 min. If you take longer to do that, you run the risk of killing alot of the little yeasty guys as they will starve in water alone. Is this true?
 
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