Yeast Nutrients

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A1sportsdad

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Okay, so I have never used yeast nutrients before. I’m an all grain (BIAB) brewer. I usually make a yeast starter from a liquid yeast. I always thought the yeast got the minerals it needed from the grist, but now I’m not really sure. I’m looking for some feedback from all of you who know more about this than I.

Should I be using a yeast nutrient?
What should I use?
Would it be best to add it when I’m making the starter or into the fermenter?

Thanks
 

Franktalk

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I've been brewing since 1994, and I have never used any yeast nutrient. Your wort is nutrition for yeast. If the yeast is healthy and well taken care of by using it under its optimum conditions and temperatures, it will do what you ask of it. With all that said, however, if you are trying to make it do something that is outside of the optimum conditions for it such as pitch rate or temperature, you may benefit from using it. I think your best bet is to just choose the proper yeast for the job, use it in the way that it is meant to be used, and treat it to a well prepared feast of wort.
 

a_gunslinger

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Used it originally early on. But then kept forgetting to put it in. NEver had an issue. I think my healthy yeast starters combined wiht a good mash is all it needs. Nutrients possibly just in case yeast not optimal?
 

OldDogBrewing

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I use it for kveik brews as they can stall or be pretty sulphuric.

I only use it in starters, again, with kveik.

A regular strain shouldn't need them unless you're underpitching in a high Gravity wort but if you pitch enough yeast, it should be needed
 

Wagon_6

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I’ve gotten in the habit to use it for lagers and high gravity brews. It’s simple and goes in with the whirlfloc. But who knows how much it helps.
 
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A1sportsdad

A1sportsdad

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Only in yeast starters
Okay, so it calls for 1/2 tsp of nutrient for 5 gallons. I’m making a 5 gallon batch. I’m making a 1.5 L starter. If I’m adding it in my 1.5 L starter and this is when I add the nutrient, do I still add 1/2 tsp into the starter?
 

mashpaddled

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I use it in high gravity batches and lagers. Basically anything with a risk of fermentation problems gets it as an insurance policy. Same with oxygen.
 

Panderson1

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Okay, so it calls for 1/2 tsp of nutrient for 5 gallons. I’m making a 5 gallon batch. I’m making a 1.5 L starter. If I’m adding it in my 1.5 L starter and this is when I add the nutrient, do I still add 1/2 tsp into the starter?
Interesting... Never really thought of it like that. I normally use about 1/4 teaspoon in the starter. I guess with the math i'm supposed to use 1/8th but that is ridiculously small -- not even sure how to measure that. Not sure if it helps but I've always had good ferments since I switched to starters/liquid yeast. I'd like to hear others respond to your question.
 
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A1sportsdad

A1sportsdad

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Interesting... Never really thought of it like that. I normally use about 1/4 teaspoon in the starter. I guess with the math i'm supposed to use 1/8th but that is ridiculously small -- not even sure how to measure that. Not sure if it helps but I've always had good ferments since I switched to starters/liquid yeast. I'd like to hear others respond to your question.
I was reading an instruction on making a starter from BisonBrew.com and they actually call out a 1/2 tsp yeast nutrient in the starter, so I guess the whole thing. In a way it makes sense since it's the same amount of yeast whether you directly pitch it into the fermenter or put it in a starter first.
 
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