Yeast Nutrient?

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cabledawg

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When should you add yeast nutrient? Should you add it during the boil? If so is the correct amount 1tsp per gallon?
 

HOOTER

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I always use it. Anything you can do to help the yeast can be beneficial. After all, if you love your yeasties, they'll love you back.

I believe 1/2 tsp. is adequate. If I make a starter I'll boil it with my DME, if I'm using dry yeast (no starter) I'll throw it in the boil with about 10 min. remaining.
 

planenut

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The Wyeast I use says to add 1/2 tsp to 5 gallons with 10 minutes remaining in the boil.

I also use 1/4 tsp in a 1000ml starter when using liquid yeast.
 
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cabledawg

cabledawg

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Thanks for all the input. Just got done brewing a holiday spice ale so I hope I get better results.
 

0202

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1/2 tsp in the starter boil per gallon, or net?
 

0202

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Thanks!

Getting everything together for 1st (hopefully thoroughly researched) batch.
 

avidhomebrewer

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Well, from what I have seen, it depends on the og of the beer. I have seen upwards of 1 tsp for high gravity beers (around 1.1+) per gallon. Ultra-high gravity beers need more nutrients, so that has worked for me in the past. I usually don't add nutrients to normal strength (~5% and under) because there is enough in the malt available to the yeast.
 

HOOTER

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Well, from what I have seen, it depends on the og of the beer. I have seen upwards of 1 tsp for high gravity beers (around 1.1+) per gallon. Ultra-high gravity beers need more nutrients, so that has worked for me in the past. I usually don't add nutrients to normal strength (~5% and under) because there is enough in the malt available to the yeast.
I use White Labs nutrient. Here's what they have to say:

Give your beer, mead, wine, or yeast culture an energy boost! Use 1/2 teaspoon per 5 gallons of beer. Store at 40-70F. Add to boil in last 5 min., or boil separately for 5 min. Shelf life is nine months from date of preparation on vial. White Labs Nutrient is comprised mostly of amino acids, which are building blocks for proteins. It doesn't speed up a fermentation much, but it does make for healthier yeast. It can be used with Servomyces.

White Labs Yeast Nutrient is a complex blend of nitrogen, vitamins, and co-factors. We designed it specifically for White Labs Yeast to increase vitality and viability in our yeast propagations. It is different from other nutrients in the market is because of the increased amount and variety of amino acids and cofactors. This increases the rate of metabolism, which results in faster fermentation and greater yeast viability. I t is an affordable way to increase the success of your brew. Our brewers have found it very beneficial for first generation, stuck fermentation and high gravity beers. Yeast nutrient can also be helpful when brewing high gravity beers. For commercial breweries, we package it in dry form in vials that are re-measured for 5 barrels. Nutrient is good for every generation and a must for beers above 1.070 SG or 17 Plato.
It sounds like 1/2 tsp. is adequate for 5 gallons, at least as far as WLN1000 is concerned. I'm not sure about other types of nutrient.
 

0202

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My concern was mainly precautionary.

I'm brewing with malt extract, and I've read that extracts can contain varying amounts of refined sugars, which can rob the yeast of some nutrition that would be in a 100% malt solution.
 
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