yeast in bottle

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newbrewr4fun

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I just got to wondering how all that yeast sediment makes it into a bottle of beer. The beer was feremented in a primary then racked to a secondary, then racked to a bottling bucket and bottled. Now It seems to me that most of the yeast would be left behind in the primary and secondary stages of fermenting, how does all that yeast sediment get into a bottle? Is that really yeast that was floating around in the beer? I was careful not to disturb the beer too much and made sure not to siphon up sediment. I know yeast in a bottle is a good thing, I just don't see how it gets there.
 

FlyGuy

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That's mostly yeast excrement in the bottom of the bottle -- its an unfortunate product of them metabolizing your priming sugar. That's why you should never drink it, and it tastes bad. :D







Seriously, its pretty much just yeast cells and perhaps other compounds (e.g., tannins, proteins, etc.) that are coming out of suspension naturally over time.
 

TheFlatline

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Plus, yeast will reproduce when introduced to your carbing sugar.

My irish red was crystal clear (you could read through the carboy) when I bottled, and about 12 hours later the beer was slightly hazy. There's some sediment now, but nothing near as bad as when I went straight to bottling after fermentation completed.
 

shdybrady

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Why does the beer you buy not have it. Is there a way for the homebrewer to get rid of it?
 

Boston Brew Guy

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If you bottle condition there is no way to get rid of it. If you filter out the yeast you have to force carbonate it. I don't believe this can be done without a keg by a home brewer.
 

Joker

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Kegging is the only way to remove the sediment and still have carbonation.
 

Bytor1100

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Also many brews you buy in the store have yeast sediment at the bottom. Take a look at some of them.
 
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