Quantcast

Yeast for Semi Sweet Mead?

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

dubwicht

New Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2005
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
I am working on a list of ingredients for my first batch of Mead and would like some advice. I would like to make a semi sweet wine like a German Reisling (about a 2 on the sweetness scale). I am woried that the Sweet Mead yeasts will make mead like a desert wine and I have heard that large and impressive hanovers are spawned by the stuff. It sounds like the dry yeasts make very dry Mead without sweetness and my wife would not like that. Is there something inbetween? Perhaps I should ferment it dry and add sweetness? Is sweetness a function of the quantity of honey used?


Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Cheers,




Doug :confused:
 

rightwingnut

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2004
Messages
463
Reaction score
4
Location
New Jersey
I'd like to know, too...if there is no "in between" yeast, maybe adding more honey than normally...more honey than the "dry" yeast can ferment...maybe there's a wine yeast that'll do the trick on its own...
 

Janx

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2004
Messages
1,677
Reaction score
24
Location
San Francisco Bay Area
I've used the Wyeast Sweet Mead yeast and it still went fairly dry. Not like a desert wine. Maybe a percent or two residual sugar. Champagne and Dry Mead yeast will ferment it to high alcohol and very dry.

Sweetness is a function of how much honey and to what extent the yeast can ferment it dry. It's been a while since I brewed much mead, but I think the Sweet Mead yeast did what you want with a mead on the order of 3 pounds of honey per gallon. Remember, you need to add acidity and nutrients.

An alternative would be to ferment with champagne yeast and then arrest the fermentation with sulfites. I think that's how wine makers make sweeter wines (I think?)
 
OP
D

dubwicht

New Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2005
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Thank you for the input. I have read alot about mead and the information is sometimes conflicting. It sounds like the sweet mead yeast may do the trick. I would like to avoid using sulphites and other chemicals if possible.

Cheers,


Dubwicht
 
Top