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Yeast for a porter?

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BPD

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found an extract with steeping for a porter that uses 6 lbs of light malt extract plus the steeping grains. the recipe uses US-05. my question is should this be US-04 or Nottingham? I thought 05 finishes cleaner and dryer (as well as Notty)
 

s3n8

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I just did a vanilla porter and used US-04. I did not want it too . Depends on what you are going for, Clean and dry, use 05 or Nottingham. If you are going for something a little maltier and full bodied, go for US-04.
 

mkling

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If you are going for something a little maltier and full bodied, go for US-04.
I'd say go for s-04. It will give you a maltier, full bodied beer that Notty or US-05. And it's a porter for goodness sake -- if you don't want a malty, full bodied beer brew a different kind of beer.
 
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BPD

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Definitely the S-05 is out.

Have only brewed 12 batches so far so I do not have enough experience with the dry yeasts. can someone enlighten me a little with the differences between S-04 and Notty?

I have looked at the descriptions from MWS and a couple of other vendors and from the manufactures site and what I have gleaned from this site but I always learn better from those more experienced. I am under the impression that S-04 has more phenols and esters (which I thought leans towards English dark and stronger ales) than S-05 which finishes drier and cleaner (more for American ales and lager-like beers) and Notty is in the middle leaning closer too S-05. If I am wrong please correct me.
 

mkling

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Definitely the S-05 is out.
I am under the impression that S-04 has more phenols and esters (which I thought leans towards English dark and stronger ales) than S-05 which finishes drier and cleaner (more for American ales and lager-like beers) and Notty is in the middle leaning closer too S-05. If I am wrong please correct me.
You are exactly right. For me, a porter is a dark, strong ale & I like some of those phenols & esters, so I go for the S-04. (S-04 is lower in them than most other English yeasts.) However, if you'd like a more American styled porter (Sierra Nevada, Blackhook, etc.), then Notty would be just fine.
 

HotbreakHotel

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I just used S-04 in a cream stout. I had it consistently at 65-68 degrees, and the 04 petered out at 1.024. This was not a big beer, just 1.060 OG. The beer was still too cloyingly sweet, and based on the ingredients it was supposed to finish at 1.018. I like to put in unfermentables to control the sweetness, not have the yeast fail to ferment the fermentables. Anyway, I pitched S-05 just because I had it and it finished to 1.018 and I was very happy with the flavor. Maybe I got the best of both worlds --the phenols and esters of the 04 and the complete finish of the 05.
 
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BPD

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Decided I want to do this Barleywine https://www.homebrewtalk.com/f74/johns-red-english-barleywine-97485/ next month and am going to scale it to 2.5 gallons. Was wondering what effect would I have on the porter if I use this yeast WLP007 for the porter and then pitch the barleywine wort onto the yeast cake? the porter will be scaled down to 2.5 gallons also. I know this yeast attenuates approx 10% more and will probably dry the porter some, if this is the case could I use DME instead of LME and pick up a little more OG to keep the finish for the porter close to what it is supposed to be? or do you think that since this is similar to WPL002 it should be no problem and give me more of the "English Ale" than the S-04 or Notty?
 

usurpers26

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<Dissenting voice here> :)

You should know that your beer will be nice and malty and nice and full bodied due to your grain bill and mashing technique. If you are secure with this then I would fully endorse using S-05 or Notty (they are pretty much interchangable). Even moreso, using either one will allow you to squeeze out even more of the fermentables.

We have a one month old Imperial Porter, OG was 22*P, pitched two packets of Notty and last check/taste test had it down to 4.5*P, perfect body and plenty malty. On top of that, the IBU/SG is a hair over 1.0

:mug:


I'd say go for s-04. It will give you a maltier, full bodied beer that Notty or US-05. And it's a porter for goodness sake -- if you don't want a malty, full bodied beer brew a different kind of beer.
 
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BPD

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<Dissenting voice here> :)

You should know that your beer will be nice and malty and nice and full bodied due to your grain bill and mashing technique. If you are secure with this then I would fully endorse using S-05 or Notty (they are pretty much interchangable). Even moreso, using either one will allow you to squeeze out even more of the fermentables.
After this thread had originally decided to use Notty. This was to be an easy extract+grain recipe in between PM batches of Belgian Wit and a Hefeweizen. Thanks for the endorsement. I have not brewed this yet and have since decided I want to also do the Barleywine recipe posted above and am now torn between using the Notty for the porter or using the WLP007 so that I can use the yeast cake for my starter for the Barleywine. These are both styles that are new to me so I have no grasp of what the difference would be.

We have a one month old Imperial Porter, OG was 22*P, pitched two packets of Notty and last check/taste test had it down to 4.5*P, perfect body and plenty malty. On top of that, the IBU/SG is a hair over 1.0
Have only been brewing less than a year and am not sure what the IBU/SG ratio means and how to calculate it.

Any info, guidance and insight would be appreciated.
 

s3n8

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IBU/SG ratio is exactly what it sounds like, plug in your Bittering Units number and your Orginal Gravity. So if 22*P is 1.092, you should shoot for 92 IBUs for ~1.
 
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