Quantcast

Yeast Breeding

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

rdanneskjold

New Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2019
Messages
3
Reaction score
1
Hello Everyone, my first post here on the forum. :)

Question about yeast. My thinking is, since it's alive and it reproduces and grows, why should we buy yeast for every batch? Could you not just start a culture with a dropper-full and let it do its thing? maybe it takes a while to get to the volume required by the recipe, but that is a matter of patience and planning.

I am in the equipment gathering stage of brewing. I think I'm about 2 weeks out from my first attempt. I am an engineer by trade, so hopefully some of my ideas will be unique and interesting. I am a notoriously cheap bastard, so my emphasis will a) make good beer, b) make it as cheaply and as easy as possible. :)

RD
 
Joined
Jan 17, 2012
Messages
2,700
Reaction score
884
Location
Ellsworth
Most of us that have been around for awhile do reuse yeast from one fermentation to another. I usually go 3-4 fermentations, but I've read posts where some go much further. Look around and you'll find plenty of posts about reusing yeast.
By the way, Welcome!
 

day_trippr

Bastard-covered bastard with bastard filling
Joined
May 31, 2011
Messages
33,157
Reaction score
14,206
Location
Stow, MA
Agreed, lots of hbt folks are ranching/farming/freezing yeast for banking. I currently have six strains in the fridge, doing over-built starters (I never repitch).
Plenty of reading available here...

Cheers!
 

mashpaddled

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 25, 2018
Messages
363
Reaction score
187
Location
Denver, CO
You'll find a lot of homebrewers maintain strains through various methods. There is usually a terminal point to a given culture because through the imperfection of brewing practices and sanitation the culture will drift away from its original character. It could be from low levels of infections or simply your harvest methods select yeast that have slightly different attributes than the original mix of yeast cells. An easy way to avoid that is to build your starters larger than you need and maintain a culture from the starters. The less equipment involved in touching the culture the fewer opportunities exist for infection. By harvesting from the starter rather than a full beer you also reduce the probability of selecting cells with characteristics you don't want.
 
OP
R

rdanneskjold

New Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2019
Messages
3
Reaction score
1
That's kind of where I was going with this. My thought is to take a package of yeast, pour some into a starter dish with nutrients, and immediately heat-seal the rest of the package and put back in the freezer. It may not seem like much is saved here in terms of time and money, so I'll probably at least at first just go by the book. In the mean time I will be soaking up all the information I can. :)

Thanks!
 

jimfire85

Active Member
Joined
Sep 24, 2012
Messages
35
Reaction score
13
Location
vernon
Top