Wyeast American Wheat 1010 fermentation temperature

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fknizner

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I want to brew something along the lines of blue moon/shock top. I really want the orange peel and coriander flavors to come through, so I don't want much clove/banana flavors from the yeast. Hence, I plan on using Wyeast American Wheat (1010). The rub: I've used this yeast before in an American Hefe and I fermented around 64 deg. F, but the yeast produced a flavor more in tune with (albeit more subtle than) a Bavarian Hefeweizen.

My question: Has any one had success in achieving more a more neutral yeast flavor by fermenting yeast American hefeweizen 1010 at lower temperatures?

I've got an external thermostat so I can ferment at any temperature. I plan on pitching with a 700 ML Starter from stir plate.

Thanks!
 

blizzard

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I think you want a belgian yeast strain for a wit beer. The yeast contributes a great deal of flavor to a witbier like blue moon. Very generally speaking, american wheat yeast should produce a cleaner profile, german yeast a hefe profile, and belgian yeast a wit profile.

I don't use Wyeast 1010, but generally cooler temps make cleaner beers. Also, if you really want a clean beer that lets the spices shine, you might want to consider 1056.

I know this doesn't exactly answer your question, but hope it still helps.
 

duboman

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I think you want a belgian yeast strain for a wit beer. The yeast contributes a great deal of flavor to a witbier like blue moon. Very generally speaking, american wheat yeast should produce a cleaner profile, german yeast a hefe profile, and belgian yeast a wit profile.

I don't use Wyeast 1010, but generally cooler temps make cleaner beers. Also, if you really want a clean beer that lets the spices shine, you might want to consider 1056.

I know this doesn't exactly answer your question, but hope it still helps.

I would have said the same thing:) I would try a Belgian strain


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fknizner

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Thanks, blizzard.

Any recommendation for a good belgian wit yeast & suggested ferm temp for that yeast?

I was also considering 1056--it's my go-to yeast for many beers, especially ones with spices.
 

chickypad

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I use 1010 a lot and get very clean profiles fermenting at 67-68*. Did you underpitch that batch by any chance? Anyway, sounds like you're set with the wit yeast.
 
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fknizner

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Thanks, everybody.

I'll give the 3944 a try, fermenting around 66-68. I'm just too skeptical/have had too many bad experience going over 70.

I don't think I under pitched my American Hefe, I think I was just [unrealistically] expecting something closer to 1056. Since that experience I've been using Wyeast Kolsch 2565 with my American Hefe recipe and been getting a beer that tastes a lot like goose island 312 urban wheat, which i'm really pleased with. 1010 just doesn't do it for me, oh well.

Thanks again!
 

duboman

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Thanks, everybody.

I'll give the 3944 a try, fermenting around 66-68. I'm just too skeptical/have had too many bad experience going over 70.

I don't think I under pitched my American Hefe, I think I was just [unrealistically] expecting something closer to 1056. Since that experience I've been using Wyeast Kolsch 2565 with my American Hefe recipe and been getting a beer that tastes a lot like goose island 312 urban wheat, which i'm really pleased with. 1010 just doesn't do it for me, oh well.

Thanks again!
So the reality is that an American wheat is really all about the grist and not so much the yeast meaning most of the Wheat characteristics come from the wheat. I use 1056 for mine and it provides a very clean ferment so the grain shines through unlike a Hefe which is more about the yeast. I've never been a fan of 1010.

As for temps on a belgian, belgian strains derive most of their flavor profiles from fermentation temperature, the warmer they get the more funky belgian you get. In some cases if you go to cool they simply drop out before they are done so be careful with that. Generally for all belgian strains I use I like to pitch a bit cold and then just let them rise to wherever they want to go and let them finish.

If you like the Bavarian style hefe then I would suggest WY3056 fermented mid to low temp range. It's a really nice clean yeast without all the attributes of 3068, that's just my .02........
 
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