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Wyeast 1084 Fermentation Profile For Dry Stout

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I'm currently making a starter with Wyeast 1084 to be used in a Dry Stout recipe. I am not familiar with WY 1084. Wyeast Labs states the ideal temperature range is 62F-72F.

When I research what others have fermented at, it is all over the place. Some people ferment at 62F for 14 days, while others go up to 72F. Many have various steps. Most try to avoid going over 70F.

I have a CF10 so I can dump the yeast easily at any point. My initial thought for the fermentation profile is:

Primary: 63F for 5 days
Primary: 65F for 5 days
Primary: 68F for 4 days

Dump yeast

Secondary: 68F for 3 days
Cold Crash: 32F for 4 days
Condition in Bright Tank: 7-14 days

I use a Tilt, so I can easily adjust the temperature when I see the fermentation start to slow.

What are your thoughts and suggestions?
 

Franktalk

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Yours looks like a solid plan, except for the secondary. I think you will find that many/most of the brewers on here don't bother with a secondary, unless what you mean it just giving it a few days rest in the primary. That's what I would do.

There is a bit of a caveat with 1084: don't rouse it because it will produce diacetyl. So, make sure it doesn't have any buttery taste/ aroma before you rack it to the bright tank.
 

kh54s10

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IMO, no need for so many steps. Ferment at the mid range, so about 66 degrees for about 10-14 days raise the temperature to about 68 for 2 days. Dump the trub and cold crash (or not) for a couple of days. Can you keep it from sucking in air when cold crashing.

Don't know what you mean by condition in Bright Tank. If that is a step between the conical and kegging or bottling that is a transfer to another vessel, do it only if you can pressure transfer into a purged tank.
 
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Yours looks like a solid plan, except for the secondary. I think you will find that many/most of the brewers on here don't bother with a secondary, unless what you mean it just giving it a few days rest in the primary. That's what I would do.

There is a bit of a caveat with 1084: don't rouse it because it will produce diacetyl. So, make sure it doesn't have any buttery taste/ aroma before you rack it to the bright tank.
Thanks for the comments. Yes, when I was referring to secondary, I would dump the yeast and leave in the primary. I read with WY 1084 that esters start forming above 64F, so I was trying to keep that in check. As for diacetyl, I was trying to eliminate it by increasing the temperature and allowing the yeast to stay in the primary longer to clean up any diacetyl.

I have read this increase should be 6F and other articles suggest 10F. Perhaps I should lower the starting temp to 62F and adjust accordingly? Should I increase the temp by 10F or is 6F enough?

Primary: 62F for 5 days
Primary: 64F for 5 days
Primary: 68F for 4 days

Dump yeast

Secondary: 68F for 3 days
Cold Crash: 32F for 4 days
Condition in Bright Tank: 7-14 days

IMO, no need for so many steps. Ferment at the mid range, so about 66 degrees for about 10-14 days raise the temperature to about 68 for 2 days. Dump the trub and cold crash (or not) for a couple of days. Can you keep it from sucking in air when cold crashing.

Don't know what you mean by condition in Bright Tank. If that is a step between the conical and kegging or bottling that is a transfer to another vessel, do it only if you can pressure transfer into a purged tank.
I appreciate you posting. The steps is my attempt to reduce esters and at the same time having a sufficient diacetyl rest.

Yes, my term "conditioning" involves a closed pressure transfer from the conical to the purged bright tank. I will then carb in the bright tank to the desired CO2 level. Then when my current batch in fermenter is about ready to transfer to the bright tank, I will first bottle the beer from the bright tank.

Below is a picture when I had just completed a closed pressure transfer and was about to set the CO2 regulator to the desired pressure on the bright tank.

IMG_2734.jpg
 

McKnuckle

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I know that diacetyl is the bogeyman for many styles, but don't underestimate its potentially positive contribution to a dry Irish stout. It is even a signature taste component in some stouts, such as those produced by Samuel Smith in Yorkshire.

Obviously I'm not talking about something overwhelming and gross, but neither do you need to obsessively avoid every trace of it. 1084 (WLP004) is the Guinness yeast, and it does produce a bit of "D" which you may find is a nice complement to the roasty quality of the beer.
 

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