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Wyeast 1007 German Ale and clarity

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GunnerMan

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Ok I am no expert on yeasts so I was browsing Wyeasts site yesterday looking for an ale yeast that would ferment fairly crisp and clean. I am planning on brewing a "Pilsner Ale," I have a friend who loves Pils but I don't have the means to lager so I want to see if I can get in the ballpark with an Ale strain. (I wont give it to him unless it is close, it will be his first home brew and I want him to get into the hobby)

So anyways, I concluded the German Ale at about 60-62 f would produce a good 'knockoff' but the flocculation is next to none, what can I do to get the yeast to fall out of suspension? I was looking at clarifiers but I wasint sure which one might work.

I think, for a beer like this, that the look is very important in the perception of the beer. I don't have a secondary, but will invest in one if it is the best route to clearing this beer.
 

Schlenkerla

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You should be trying a dry yeast like S-05.

This will make what you after... I guarantee!

If you use pilsner malt boil your wort for 90 minutes to remove all traces of DMS. Add hops at 60 or whatever the schedule calls for on the recipe.

http://www.northernbrewer.com/dried-yeast.html

Y014 Safale US-05

A dried American Ale strain with fermentation properties resembling that of Wyeast 1056 (American Ale) or White Labs WLP001 (California Ale). Produces well-balanced beers with low diacetyl and a very clean, crisp palate. Sedimentation is low to medium, and final gravity is medium. Optimum temp: 59°-75° F

 

Iechyd Da

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I just used 1007 for a Altbier and cold crashed the primary for 4 days at 32F. I racked to the keg and was pleasantly surprised on how clear the hydrometer sample was. I wouldn't be too worried about the clarity it is not like a hefe yeast. I use a lot of US-05 and I would say the flocculation is about the same.
 

Shawn Hargreaves

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A German ale or Kolsch style yeast would be perfect for a brew like this. The main trick here is time. A lot of time. Not only will that give the yeast a chance to clear out of suspension, but it will also clean up the flavors which is important for a clean beer style like this. These yeasts are ale yeasts that have flavor characteristics somewhat similar to a lager, and they take a lager-like amount of time for the beer to be ready, too. I'd give it at least a month in the primary, if not more.
 

cubbies

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German Ale 1007 is one of my "house yeasts". I keep it around all the time, and it is a very clean yeast. Now, as clean as it is, I don't think you can pull off a Pilsner-Ale. It still has some fruitiness to it, even fermented cold (I ferment around 56 with it). You could probably pull off a bock or something, but I think the yeast flavors would come through on a Pilsner style ale. Certainly worth a shot though. I have never had a problem with clarity as long as you give it a nice long cold crash.
 

Schlenkerla

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A German ale or Kolsch style yeast would be perfect for a brew like this. The main trick here is time. A lot of time. Not only will that give the yeast a chance to clear out of suspension, but it will also clean up the flavors which is important for a clean beer style like this. These yeasts are ale yeasts that have flavor characteristics somewhat similar to a lager, and they take a lager-like amount of time for the beer to be ready, too. I'd give it at least a month in the primary, if not more.
That why I suggested S-05. Time and temp issues.

German Ale 1007 is one of my "house yeasts". I keep it around all the time, and it is a very clean yeast. Now, as clean as it is, I don't think you can pull off a Pilsner-Ale. It still has some fruitiness to it, even fermented cold (I ferment around 56 with it). You could probably pull off a bock or something, but I think the yeast flavors would come through on a Pilsner style ale. Certainly worth a shot though. I have never had a problem with clarity as long as you give it a nice long cold crash.
I make Biermunchers Cream Ale and its like a BL or ML. It uses S-05

If you are looking for an Urkell or Budvar go with 1007 I guess.

For clarity, time and irish moss do the job well. A good wort chiller will help with removing chill haze.
 

McKBrew

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Not the yeast you want to use if you want a clear beer. It's actually a recommended yeast for American wheats, and from personal experience it doesn't settle well.
 

-Dan-

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A German ale or Kolsch style yeast would be perfect for a brew like this. The main trick here is time. A lot of time. Not
A lot of time? For what if I may ask? I have Wyeast German Ale always in stock or at least a washed jar ready. German Ale cleans up better than Wyeast Kolsch. Both ferment fairly quickly anywhere between 60-70deg. German Ale cleans up nicer than Kolsch. Cold crash at 40 for 2-3 days and you have a beautiful brew. I usually ferment them between 8-10 days, bottle or keg ... and if kegged while you can drink it right away it is awesome after said 2-3 days.
 
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GunnerMan

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Thanks guys, I understand im not going to get a true tasting pils with an Ale yeast, I accept that but I want to use what ever yeast I can to come as close as possible in appearance and taste.

So what im gathering here is the German Ale will be a good yeast if I give it lots of time and cold crash it.

Or use a dry yeast like Safale US-05 if I want a clearer beer in less time and still have the crisp taste.

I don't have a spare fridge around(if I did id just lager) to cold crash my whole carboy after fermentation.

Also I am trying to get something like a Bittburger, which I have never tasted, so I am using a recipe I found on the internet. From what I gathered it is a medium to light bodied beer, with medium maltyness, and a noticeably pressent hop charachter. Some DMS and sulfer may be detectable.


So far I am leaning towards the German Ale, ill leave it in the fermenter for upwards of a month and then bottle it and let it age some more. I migh go buy a secondary so I can let it sit for a while without tying up a primary. I can ferment at around 60-62 degrees.
I am def going to try it an see what happens.
 

Schlenkerla

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Don't forget you can bottle lager for 6-8 weeks. It works pretty good just not as good as the regular process.
 

Brew-boy

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I just used this yeast in a temp to try and make a Schwarzbier. I thought the yeast cleared very well, but did it pass the test? I think it made a good clean great tasting beer. I do not think I could pass this off as a true Schwarzbier but hey it's homebrew and it Shall not go to waste.
 
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GunnerMan

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Yeah im not hoping or expecting it to pass as a true Pils at all, what I am looking for is to get some of the flavor profiles of a pils but keep it fairly crisp and quaffable. Maybe next weekend ill brew it up.
 
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