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WY1098 - How fast is too fast?

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Omahawk

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I brewed on short notice last Saturday night (11-14-14). Yooper's Fizzy Yellow beer (slightly tweaked with 7lbs Vienna, 3lbs US pale, .2 lbs acid malt). Mashed at 149 F. I am hoping to have it ready and kegged for a get together this coming Friday (11-28-14). I know I'm pushing it, and that's why I chose a fast and high flocculating yeast - Wyeast 1098.

I pitched two packs (no starter) of fresh yeast. Krausen was there within 8-12 hours, and I let it go at 64 degrees for 4 days, activity slowed down and I raised the temp up to 72. SG = 1.048
Day 6 G= 1.010
Day 7 G = 1.009
Day 8 G = 1.009

So, it's likely at terminal gravity now (Day 8 ). Here's my proposed schedule from here on out:

Day 8-10: maintain in fermenter at 72.
Day 11: cold crash in fridge
Day 12: transfer to keg
Day 12-14: pressurize at 30-40 psi
Day 14: drink

I'm usually not in a hurry, and usually let it sit in the fermenter longer, cold crash longer, and pressurize slower and lower.

Any suggestions to my schedule? (Other than not to be in such a big hurry). ;-)
 

Yooper

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I'd change it up, to have it clear and nicely carbed by drinking day.

If it's been at FG for at least a couple days, and it doesn't taste like green apple ( acetaldehyde), it's about done. I'd keg today, and raise it up to 72 or so. Let it sit only a day, and then stick it in the kegerator. I'd hold at 30 psi for 36 hours, purge, and reset to serving pressure (12 psi in my case). That should do it.
 

estricklin

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I'd change it up, to have it clear and nicely carbed by drinking day.

If it's been at FG for at least a couple days, and it doesn't taste like green apple ( acetaldehyde), it's about done. I'd keg today, and raise it up to 72 or so. Let it sit only a day, and then stick it in the kegerator. I'd hold at 30 psi for 36 hours, purge, and reset to serving pressure (12 psi in my case). That should do it.
I'd probably do about the same thing too. The first pint or 2 may have some sludge but it won't be anything you can't live with.
 
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Omahawk

Omahawk

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I'd change it up, to have it clear and nicely carbed by drinking day.

If it's been at FG for at least a couple days, and it doesn't taste like green apple ( acetaldehyde), it's about done. I'd keg today, and raise it up to 72 or so. Let it sit only a day, and then stick it in the kegerator. I'd hold at 30 psi for 36 hours, purge, and reset to serving pressure (12 psi in my case). That should do it.
Thanks for the advice. Samples have tasted pretty clean, so I should be good there. I'm going to take one last measurement today and make sure.

Out of curiosity, what is the reason to keg warm and then leave at the higher temp for a day? Is it just due to potentially "rousing" the yeast via transfer and creating a little more fermentation activity? In that case, I suppose you'd want to let a short burst of yeast activity run its course. I've never done that before, but it makes sense.
 

Yooper

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Thanks for the advice. Samples have tasted pretty clean, so I should be good there. I'm going to take one last measurement today and make sure.

Out of curiosity, what is the reason to keg warm and then leave at the higher temp for a day? Is it just due to potentially "rousing" the yeast via transfer and creating a little more fermentation activity? In that case, I suppose you'd want to let a short burst of yeast activity run its course. I've never done that before, but it makes sense.
I have this "thing" about making sure the beer is at FG for at least three days before chilling. While I really believe that the "clean up" phase that we talk about is done at the end of fermentation, and is over shortly after FG is reached, three days has always been my buffer zone before chilling the beer. It's probably not strictly necessary, but I really like the idea of three days at least at FG before chilling the beer.

I've had a bit of a flu bug, and I have a beer next to me that I meant to keg on Wednesday. I'm still a bit under the weather today, so I'll get to it tomorrow. It's been at FG for over a week I'm sure (haven't checked but I brewed it a couple of weeks ago and the krausen fell about 10 days ago), so when I keg that tomorrow I'll just pop it right into the kegerator and put it on the gas.
 
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Omahawk

Omahawk

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I have this "thing" about making sure the beer is at FG for at least three days before chilling.
Yeah, I've always preferred to leave it in the primary a little more than I probably need to as well. Just curious if there was a reason to transfer, then let it sit in the keg a day, rather than just leaving it in the primary an extra day, then transfer and put the keg in the kegerator right away.

Thanks. Get well soon.
 
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Omahawk

Omahawk

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It came out a little cloudy, but appropriately carbed and tasty. I'm ready to roll. Thanks.
 

carboywonder

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Next time consider adding some gelatin at kegging to clear it up a bit. If you want a quick turn around it helps.
 
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Omahawk

Omahawk

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While it was decent at Day 14, after spending 4-6 weeks in the keg cold, it was really good.
 
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