Wort Chiller Diameter

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mendozer

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Hey i'm building my wort chiller, hopefully today. I wanted to know how much space to allow between the chiller and the pot. I'm using a 40 qt pot which measures 14" in dia, while a clay pipe from the garden i wanted to use measures 8" dia. Is 3 inches too much or will I be fine? I also have to keep in mind that this is my parent's pot. When I move back to Washington, I'll probably buy a 32qt b/c its cheaper.

what do you think
 
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mendozer

mendozer

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ok so i finished shaping everything. I saw on someone's blog they soldered the grooves together so it holds as one. I just spend about 30 minutes soldering and resoldering only to see my solder fall out after tension is let off the coils. How else can I weld my tubing together in a food-safe way?
 

BigCask

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I used copper wire (from regular romex electrical wiring) to bind the coils together. Seems pretty sturdy ...

-BigCask
 

Bobby_M

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You're probably not getting the copper clean enough. The parts that you want soldered together have to be spotless and shiny which you achieve with 220 sandpaper. Apply flux, heat, solder.
 

SynicalKaos

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Agreed... Use some sandpaper to prep the copper.

Be sure to post some pics of your build. Brew pr0n is always appreciated by us all.
 
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mendozer

mendozer

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How do you apply flux? Is that a liquid or something? I just heat and solder. Also, I'm using silver solder b/c its lead free. Right now I have zip ties holding the coils together while I wait to solder
 

ttastrom

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Flux is a paste that is applied to prevent the oxidation of the metals when they are heated to high temperatures. You can get a small can of flux at your local plumbing supply store, hardware store or Home Depot for a few bucks. You "paint" the joint that you want to solder prior to applying the flame with a small brush that you can purchase when you buy the flux.
 
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mendozer

mendozer

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Got it. paste it, heat it and solder. Great. i'll let you know how it goes and post pics.
 
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mendozer

mendozer

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how should I clean up flux residue? it's slimy and probably not safe for food haha. Will regular soap get it off?
 

boneshb

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I made mine a few days ago, no need to solder, just use the copper wire. Unless you are trying to sell it or impress somoeone, what does it matter?
 
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mendozer

mendozer

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finally finished. i rinsed the flux off with water b/c it said it was water flushable. I still rubbed it down with alcohol as well. There's still some in between soldered grooves, but it's lead free so whatever.

I also rubbed the whole piece down with white vinegar. I read somewhere it prevents it from turning green...purely aesthetic reason.

So some of the soldering still came off, but I decided to get copper wire and twisted it tightly on and folded the excess into the middle. Again...purely aesthetic just to hold it together firmly.

Don't take my cost as realistic. It was about $70-80 on parts, but I live in Hawaii. The same 3/8" OD copper coil I got for $40 was probably $15 anywhere else in the nation.



The clay cylinder I used. Had a diameter of 8 inches.



Some ugly soldering. I'm not experienced at all :mug:



Did the handle just to be sturdy




The copper wire "ties"



And the finished product involving vinyl tubing, hose clamps, and a 5/8" hose barb thing for the garden hose
 

MonkeyWrench

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Here's mine, fine copper wire woven in and out of the coils and twisted at the bottom. This way, there's about 1/16" between coils for more surface area.

You can also see my fermentation box and some apfelwein in the background :rockin:

 
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mendozer

mendozer

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holy smokes you certainly tried hard on that. nice job. you could make them to sell. I just did it in 15 minutes lol:rockin:
 

SynicalKaos

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Good Job Mendozer! Have you tried it out yet? Gave it a test run in a pot of boiling water?

Heck, while I'm at it. Here's mine.
 
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mendozer

mendozer

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I did not because I'm getting my equipment ready before I start everything.
 

SynicalKaos

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Ah, but I know you want to... hehehe.

The first run my chiller ever had was in my wife's spaghetti pot the night it got finished. I just couldn't wait for brew day.
 
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mendozer

mendozer

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It was great. chilled from 187 to 78 in about 20 minutes. don't know if that's really fast, but it works for me
 
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