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World's cheapest counter pressure bottle filler

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Live42

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I just wanted to share the way that I've been filling bottles from the keg, since I haven't seen anyone else do it this way.

Literally all you need is a 2 inch piece of 1/2 inch ID silicone hose. The key to this is that the hose creates an airtight seal between the tap and the bottle so that as the bottle fills the pressure increases, meaning that it won't foam. The bottle will fill about a third of the way and then stop. Then, just back the bottle off a bit to allow some pressure out, and it will continue filling.

1. Sanitize the hose - (also, its much easier to slide the hose on when its wet)
2. Slip it over the end of the keg faucet
3. Slip the bottle over the end of the hose
4. Push the bottle as far up as it will go to create a seal
5. Turn on the tap, and the bottle will start to fill
6. As the bottle fills, pull the bottle down a bit to release some of the pressure

You can also flush the bottle with CO2 separately first if you want. I connect a short piece of hose to an unused output on my gas manifold. Hose goes to the bottom of the bottle, and then turn on the gas for a couple seconds.

Made a little video to illustrate the process:

 
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treacheroustexan

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I kind of do this, but I just use the growler filler attachment hose for my intertap faucets. Pretty much the same thing though. Never had any issues with oxygen or loss of carbonation.
 

logdrum

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Definitely going to try this, even from a keg, I hate bottling with a passion.
 

pinchegil

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I built a counter pressure filler using a party tap, 6 inches of hose, two stoppers and a bottle filler, as you fill the bottle the pressures rises and the beer stops flowing, you simply wobble the stopper in the bottle to release the pressure. Zero foam :). the second stopper is to keep tension on the hose/wand connection

IMG_5786.JPG
IMG_5785.JPG
 

Yeastieboy

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I just wanted to share the way that I've been filling bottles from the keg, since I haven't seen anyone else do it this way.

Literally all you need is a 2 inch piece of 1/2 inch ID silicone hose. The key to this is that the hose creates an airtight seal between the tap and the bottle so that as the bottle fills the pressure increases, meaning that it won't foam. The bottle will fill about a third of the way and then stop. Then, just back the bottle off a bit to allow some pressure out, and it will continue filling.

1. Sanitize the hose - (also, its much easier to slide the hose on when its wet)
2. Slip it over the end of the keg faucet
3. Slip the bottle over the end of the hose
4. Push the bottle as far up as it will go to create a seal
5. Turn on the tap, and the bottle will start to fill
6. As the bottle fills, pull the bottle down a bit to release some of the pressure

You can also flush the bottle with CO2 separately first if you want. I connect a short piece of hose to an unused output on my gas manifold. Hose goes to the bottom of the bottle, and then turn on the gas for a couple seconds.

Made a little video to illustrate the process:

What PSI do you push the beer at while filling a bottle with this little segment of hose?
 

McKnuckle

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So I just tried this.

And I have to say, @Live42 (who doesn't even appear to be a member any longer) deserves an award. This technique is dirt simple, dirt cheap, and much better than all the klutzy, expensive solutions for bottling off a keg that I've seen or tried.

No mess, no spill, totally in control, and I was done filling a bottle in one minute. I spent the most time running to get my capper and a cap since I didn't have those at the ready. I was just trying this on a whim.

Kudos, Live42, whereever you are...
 

Smellyglove

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So, literally filling in an oxygen-full environment/bottle? It's a good fix for same evening party, but not for storage, as I see it. One can purge beforehand, but then you need more stuff as well..
 

Bobcatbrewing42

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I just wanted to share the way that I've been filling bottles from the keg, since I haven't seen anyone else do it this way.

Literally all you need is a 2 inch piece of 1/2 inch ID silicone hose. The key to this is that the hose creates an airtight seal between the tap and the bottle so that as the bottle fills the pressure increases, meaning that it won't foam. The bottle will fill about a third of the way and then stop. Then, just back the bottle off a bit to allow some pressure out, and it will continue filling.

1. Sanitize the hose - (also, its much easier to slide the hose on when its wet)
2. Slip it over the end of the keg faucet
3. Slip the bottle over the end of the hose
4. Push the bottle as far up as it will go to create a seal
5. Turn on the tap, and the bottle will start to fill
6. As the bottle fills, pull the bottle down a bit to release some of the pressure

You can also flush the bottle with CO2 separately first if you want. I connect a short piece of hose to an unused output on my gas manifold. Hose goes to the bottom of the bottle, and then turn on the gas for a couple seconds.

Made a little video to illustrate the process:

I,m going to try that. I do something similar with a longer hose and a bottling wand. Yours seems simpler. I squirt a bunch of star san up the tap before starting. Mold loves to grow up in there. I have a Fermentis counter pressure bottle filler and the setup, and cleanup is a pain in the butt. It seems to work well for a while, then foam like crazy and I lose beer. Of course purging the bottle with CO2 is key.
 

McKnuckle

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Honestly, I would not do this to store the beer in bottles for a long time. Trying to sanitize and purge with CO2 almost defeats the purpose of its simplicity. It’s nice to be able to simply fill a bottle and bring it somewhere. For that, this easy method seems perfect.
 

Smellyglove

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Honestly, I would not do this to store the beer in bottles for a long time. Trying to sanitize and purge with CO2 almost defeats the purpose of its simplicity. It’s nice to be able to simply fill a bottle and bring it somewhere. For that, this easy method seems perfect.
One day is enough if it's a hoppy beer. It gets ruined.
 

Bobcatbrewing42

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I just wanted to share the way that I've been filling bottles from the keg, since I haven't seen anyone else do it this way.

Literally all you need is a 2 inch piece of 1/2 inch ID silicone hose. The key to this is that the hose creates an airtight seal between the tap and the bottle so that as the bottle fills the pressure increases, meaning that it won't foam. The bottle will fill about a third of the way and then stop. Then, just back the bottle off a bit to allow some pressure out, and it will continue filling.

1. Sanitize the hose - (also, its much easier to slide the hose on when its wet)
2. Slip it over the end of the keg faucet
3. Slip the bottle over the end of the hose
4. Push the bottle as far up as it will go to create a seal
5. Turn on the tap, and the bottle will start to fill
6. As the bottle fills, pull the bottle down a bit to release some of the pressure

You can also flush the bottle with CO2 separately first if you want. I connect a short piece of hose to an unused output on my gas manifold. Hose goes to the bottom of the bottle, and then turn on the gas for a couple seconds.

Made a little video to illustrate the process:

I just tried this. His tap faucets are a better shape than mine. They give a better seal. I was successful but had some beer spraying. A little tinkering will do it. I have literally not entered brewing contests because I dread the time, the waste and the cleanup using my counter pressure filler. I think that I'll sell it.
 

Bobcatbrewing42

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Honestly, I would not do this to store the beer in bottles for a long time. Trying to sanitize and purge with CO2 almost defeats the purpose of its simplicity. It’s nice to be able to simply fill a bottle and bring it somewhere. For that, this easy method seems perfect.
I think that the quick and dirty method is to fill an inch or two of beer and let the pressure off. The foaming should drive almost all oxygen out. Then finish filling.
 

Smellyglove

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I just tried this. His tap faucets are a better shape than mine. They give a better seal. I was successful but had some beer spraying. A little tinkering will do it. I have literally not entered brewing contests because I dread the time, the waste and the cleanup using my counter pressure filler. I think that I'll sell it.
You cant use this solution for entering a beer contest unless the beer is judged the same evening as you pour it. If you send it through the mail, I wouldn't bother myself. Or, you can, but unless your competing against pretty rubbish beer, I wouldn't expect much. Hoppy beers lose their presence within hours and dark roasted ones get a papery/dusty thing within two days is my experience.
 

McKnuckle

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Smelly, you are clearly a skeptic and that's perfectly okay. :) I think it's worth some experimentation. It really does not seem so completely different from bottling beer from the fermenter. It pushes all the air out as it fills, so exposure is very brief. When you pull the bottle off the hose, it foams up to the top. Cap on the foam.

Perfect O2-free environment? Of course not. But neither does it seem egregiously oxidative. I could change my mind. I put the one bottle in my fridge and I'll try it in a few days for starters. It's a delicate and straw-colored, if not overtly hoppy, pale ale. It is the type of beer that should reveal oxidation.
 

Smellyglove

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Smelly, you are clearly a skeptic and that's perfectly okay. :) I think it's worth some experimentation. It really does not seem so completely different from bottling beer from the fermenter. It pushes all the air out as it fills, so exposure is very brief. When you pull the bottle off the hose, it foams up to the top. Cap on the foam.

Perfect O2-free environment? Of course not. But neither does it seem egregiously oxidative. I could change my mind. I put the one bottle in my fridge and I'll try it in a few days for starters. It's a delicate and straw-colored, if not overtly hoppy, pale ale. It is the type of beer that should reveal oxidation.
I am a skeptic because I have gone through so much experimentation on this at home. I've tried it. I'm not saying this because I "read it somewhere", but because I've experienced it. I've oxidized several entire batches on purpose by different means just to get a ball-park at where we're at when it comes to oxidation. Filled perfectly fine batches with different variables when it comes to o2, just to get an understanding of what it takes. Oxidized beer doesn't need to taste straight up like cardboard, like ever literature says is the definite point of oxidation. Just a tad off, slightly more dull, not as bright, is oxidation in most circumstances if the beer was clean when filled. Start of oxidation is loss of bright and fresh flavors and aroma. Cardboard is way extreme form of oxidation.


This method might seem very simple, and indeed it is. But it comes at a cost. You don't buy a lada and expect it to perform as a Lamborghini on the track. Trade offs. Like I said, does work if you fill and drink it the same day. But when it comes to tastebuds YMMW.

To conclude, I've filled beers more or less this way (stopper, no purge). And they become oxidized. I've tried so many different variables. Best bet for storing as far as I've concluded (and all of the litterauture) is fill into an 02 free envirmoment to preserve the taste and aroma. Some beers might have good from some 02 exposure, but they are still oxidized, but it's good for them, until a certain point in shelf-time.
 
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shoengine

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Smelly, you are clearly a skeptic and that's perfectly okay. :) I think it's worth some experimentation. It really does not seem so completely different from bottling beer from the fermenter. It pushes all the air out as it fills, so exposure is very brief. When you pull the bottle off the hose, it foams up to the top. Cap on the foam.

Perfect O2-free environment? Of course not. But neither does it seem egregiously oxidative. I could change my mind. I put the one bottle in my fridge and I'll try it in a few days for starters. It's a delicate and straw-colored, if not overtly hoppy, pale ale. It is the type of beer that should reveal oxidation.
The beer is going to mix with O2 as it rolls around in the bottom of the bottle. Whether that is important or not is perfectly arguable. It'd be fun to send some samples off to a lab to see what the actual O2 pickup would be.
 

camonick

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I do this on a fairly regular basis and use something even more simple by eliminating the hose between the picnic tap and racking cane... I fill the bottles at serving pressure (14 psi) with 1” of headspace in the neck and cap on foam.
4C4ADFEC-B392-432A-9B2B-F2E5F7F165F5.jpeg
My beers aren’t IPAs and therefore not overly hoppy. Maybe I don’t know what oxidized beer tastes like, but I’ve never noticed any bad flavors using this method. I’ll be doing an exchange at the end of the month so maybe I’ll get some negative feedback... I’ll be interested to hear the results.
 

mongoose33

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I've tried it. It works, after a fashion, but I had a certain amount of spraying. I didn't spend a lot of time trying to perfect it as I also fill bottles with a growler-filler and it works pretty well.

If I were going to send off bottles to a comp, I'd purge with CO2 first, and make sure I'd cap on foam. One thing I found some difficulty with using this method was leaving foam in the top of the bottle to do just that.

Even so, the beer will come in contact with air. The open space inside the tubing will be replaced with air each time, so a perfect O2-free fill isn't possible.

That said, not a bad idea for short-term bottling purposes.
 

gunhaus

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I am a skeptic because I have gone through so much experimentation on this at home. I've tried it. I'm not saying this because I "read it somewhere", but because I've experienced it. I've oxidized several entire batches on purpose by different means just to get a ball-park at where we're at when it comes to oxidation. Filled perfectly fine batches with different variables when it comes to o2, just to get an understanding of what it takes. Oxidized beer doesn't need to taste straight up like cardboard, like ever literature says is the definite point of oxidation. Just a tad off, slightly more dull, not as bright, is oxidation in most circumstances if the beer was clean when filled. Start of oxidation is loss of bright and fresh flavors and aroma. Cardboard is way extreme form of oxidation.


This method might seem very simple, and indeed it is. But it comes at a cost. You don't buy a lada and expect it to perform as a Lamborghini on the track. Trade offs. Like I said, does work if you fill and drink it the same day. But when it comes to tastebuds YMMW.

To conclude, I've filled beers more or less this way (stopper, no purge). And they become oxidized. I've tried so many different variables. Best bet for storing as far as I've concluded (and all of the litterauture) is fill into an 02 free envirmoment to preserve the taste and aroma. Some beers might have good from some 02 exposure, but they are still oxidized, but it's good for them, until a certain point in shelf-time.
Smelly, i do not doubt your experiences or perceptions one bit - But statistically speaking they are an insignificantly small sampling. I say this not as a jab, but as a simple observation, because my experience is almost completely opposite yours. And this is to be expected when individuals are making small relatively limited numbers of experiments. Not at all surprising two people would get completely opposing results. Just look around this forum at all the simple methods in use the widely varying results reported.

I have been bottling from the keg with this method:
https://www.homebrewtalk.com/forum/threads/we-no-need-no-stinking-beer-gun.24678/
ever since BM first promoted it. I have bottled beers for comp, and won with them. I have bottled stouts, Marzens, and APA's that have ALL held up just fine for weeks, and in a very recent case months. (Last night I drank two Octoberfest that i bottled from the keg around March 1st this year - I tasted no detrimental characteristics, and my son thought they were BETTER than when we kicked that keg.)

My point is, if possible O2 contamination is a strong concern for you, and your experience indicates simple methods do not work for you and your beers - then by all means avoid them at all cost - But your experience will not necessarily be the same for everyone, and the only way for a person to know if it works for them or not is to try it. It is not such a big waste or big deal to bottle a couple of bottles and set them aside to see what you get. This is what i did when BM first posted the above link - I bottled a 6'r of a Two Hearted clone, a 6'r of a Sierra Nevada clone, and a 6'r of my house stout. And simply tried one from time to time. I do not have any detailed notes or time lines to give you on this; that is not the point really. I made each 6 last about a month, and even the Two Heart clone was still just fine. I was from that point sold on the simplicity! In truth I really have no need to bottle my beer and have it sit for more than a week or so, and rarely do - but it does happen like with the lonely O-fest we dug out of the fridge last night.

I say to anyone considering these simple techniques - just try it! It is not costly, you do not need to waste a keg full or anything. If it works with your beers/system/needs then you saved some dough - If not, then at least you KNOW for sure.

-John
 

Smellyglove

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Smelly, i do not doubt your experiences or perceptions one bit - But statistically speaking they are an insignificantly small sampling. I say this not as a jab, but as a simple observation, because my experience is almost completely opposite yours. And this is to be expected when individuals are making small relatively limited numbers of experiments. Not at all surprising two people would get completely opposing results. Just look around this forum at all the simple methods in use the widely varying results reported.

I have been bottling from the keg with this method:
https://www.homebrewtalk.com/forum/threads/we-no-need-no-stinking-beer-gun.24678/
ever since BM first promoted it. I have bottled beers for comp, and won with them. I have bottled stouts, Marzens, and APA's that have ALL held up just fine for weeks, and in a very recent case months. (Last night I drank two Octoberfest that i bottled from the keg around March 1st this year - I tasted no detrimental characteristics, and my son thought they were BETTER than when we kicked that keg.)

My point is, if possible O2 contamination is a strong concern for you, and your experience indicates simple methods do not work for you and your beers - then by all means avoid them at all cost - But your experience will not necessarily be the same for everyone, and the only way for a person to know if it works for them or not is to try it. It is not such a big waste or big deal to bottle a couple of bottles and set them aside to see what you get. This is what i did when BM first posted the above link - I bottled a 6'r of a Two Hearted clone, a 6'r of a Sierra Nevada clone, and a 6'r of my house stout. And simply tried one from time to time. I do not have any detailed notes or time lines to give you on this; that is not the point really. I made each 6 last about a month, and even the Two Heart clone was still just fine. I was from that point sold on the simplicity! In truth I really have no need to bottle my beer and have it sit for more than a week or so, and rarely do - but it does happen like with the lonely O-fest we dug out of the fridge last night.

I say to anyone considering these simple techniques - just try it! It is not costly, you do not need to waste a keg full or anything. If it works with your beers/system/needs then you saved some dough - If not, then at least you KNOW for sure.

-John
You are indeed correct that the final thing comes down to "try it!" like you said. Take my post as a heads up :)
 

odie

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This is too easy...ordering some silicone hose and gonna try it [emoji120]
 

Hwk-I-St8

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That process really requires two things:

1) Perlick or Intertap forward sealing faucet with the tapered nozzle
2) A wall mounted or equivalent faucet

1 is needed so that you get the nice tapered top to seal your bottle on
2 is needed because most kegerators don't have a tall enough tower to leave room to fill a bottle (especially if it's a bomber).
 

cswant88

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I might give this a shot the next time I want to take some of my brew to a party, or friends house. I've had success chilling my bottles, turning the pressure down to 2-3 psi, and just filling right off the faucet, no hose, bottle filler, or anything. If a simple piece of hose can save me having to fiddle with my regulator, it will be worth it.
 

isomerization

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You cant use this solution for entering a beer contest unless the beer is judged the same evening as you pour it. If you send it through the mail, I wouldn't bother myself. Or, you can, but unless your competing against pretty rubbish beer, I wouldn't expect much. Hoppy beers lose their presence within hours and dark roasted ones get a papery/dusty thing within two days is my experience.
Key word: your experience

I bottle off the tap, nothing added and win awards (including IPAs). Now perhaps the beers would be judged even more favorably, but you really can’t speak in absolutes.
 

odie

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That process really requires two things:

1) Perlick or Intertap forward sealing faucet with the tapered nozzle
2) A wall mounted or equivalent faucet

1 is needed so that you get the nice tapered top to seal your bottle on
2 is needed because most kegerators don't have a tall enough tower to leave room to fill a bottle (especially if it's a bomber).
Check,
Check
 

Smellyglove

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Key word: your experience

I bottle off the tap, nothing added and win awards (including IPAs). Now perhaps the beers would be judged even more favorably, but you really can’t speak in absolutes.
Well yes, my experience and my references. They might both not reflect any other situation than mine though. And it all depends on what kind of competition. I sort of mentioned that, but in other words. Have you won IPA in comps with over 50 entrants in the same class? I used IPA as an example because they are the most fragile when it comes to 02.
 
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isomerization

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Well yes, my experience and my references. They might both not reflect any other situation than mine though. And it all depends on what kind of competition. I sort of mentioned that, but in other words. Have you won IPA in comps with over 50 entrants in the same class? I used IPA as an example because they are the most fragile when it comes to 02.
No golds in IPA, but solid scores (multiple different beer with 35+) by BJCP judges.

I think a lot of it is yeast strain specific though.
 

RainyDayBrewer

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I bottle fill using a simple growler filler, ship to competitions and win medals. Maybe I am doing something wrong.
I wonder if the key would be to bottle before aging/conditioning for too long so that there is at least a little viable yeast left to clean up any oxygen or byproducts while sitting in the bottle. Part of the joy is working with a living product.

Imagine what beer was like before refined and pressurized CO2 was a thing...
 

JohnSand

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Has anybody used this yet?

I got one for Christmas and tried it out today with limited success. Part of the problem is that I'm filling from a tower, without sufficient room to pull the beer off the rigid fill tube. I filled the second bottle by the OP method quicker and neater. I'll keep thinking about the new hardware.
 

jonny24

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I use almost the same system, modified from I think? Biermuncher posting years ago in the "we need no stinking beer gun" thread.

I have a straight rigid tube about 3/8", and a 1/2" piece of vinyl that slips over that, and also slips over the end of my Intertap taps. And a stopper on the tube like in other setups. I do it straight of my taps at the bar. No picnic tap, no messing with pressure settings, works great. Beer usually has just enough foam to cap on but not waste much. I did cider for the first time today, and the lack of foam meant just capping on airspace, but it's getting drank tonight and won't matter.

I've also had beer in there for up to three weeks and din't notice anything objectionable. It might have changed in the three weeks between the keg finishing and me drinking it, but I didn't notice it, and if it did it wasn't in a bad way.
 

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