wiring garage for 240v

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Jfclem62

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So im finally making the jump over to electric brewing. I plan on doing a ss brewtech e-kettle and one of their single element controllers. My garage is on the other end of the house than the breaker box, causing this the be a run or electrical wire of about 65 feet, give or take. Due to this the length of the run, I decided to run 8/3 romex, that sound right to you guys? Also would you go 40amp breaker and receptical? or would 30 amp be ok? any help or suggestions would greatly help! Cheers
 

cubalz

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Truthfully and with all due respect, If you don't know the answers I suggest calling a certified professional to do the work for you. It is not cost prohibitive and worth the piece of mind.
 

RoguePixels

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The brewtech electric controller (versions 1,2 & 3) require a 30amp GFCI breaker which needs at least 10 gauge wire. As previously stated, if you're at all unsure about your needs, please consider hiring an electrician to do this. I've pulled my own but also brought in a professional for a different pull. I believe that was around $300 but ymmv. It's worth the investment if you're not comfortable doing it yourself.
 

FloppyKnockers

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So im finally making the jump over to electric brewing. I plan on doing a ss brewtech e-kettle and one of their single element controllers. My garage is on the other end of the house than the breaker box, causing this the be a run or electrical wire of about 65 feet, give or take. Due to this the length of the run, I decided to run 8/3 romex, that sound right to you guys? Also would you go 40amp breaker and receptical? or would 30 amp be ok? any help or suggestions would greatly help! Cheers
Given the length of run I would say 8g and 40amp might be the way to go. Although 10g is all you need, 10g can only be run ~64 without exceeding the 3% voltage drop. 8g you can run ~75 feet. With that I would also install a 40 amp receptacle and breaker. Mainly to not confuse anybody else who may work on this circuit later.

Without knowing your house or its layout, I cannot give any advice as to how to run. For that I would refer you to the NEC.
 
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mirthfuldragon

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This situation is also an opportunity to evaluation your garage wiring as a whole, so you aren't doing all this again in another five or ten years when you buy an electric car, a table saw, or other major electrical draw. Adding a sub-panel and upgrading the wiring to handle larger load isn't necessarily all that more expensive, but doing it twice is certainly more expensive.

As someone who has done a lot of DIY electrical (and been inspected and passed), anything going on inside the panel is something I hire out.
 

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