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Wine from coffee fruit (cherries)

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Did my due diligence search but came up with nothing. Thought maybe someone here could chime in. I have access to the juice from coffee cherries. Its quite sweet. Been making beer for ever but have no idea how to make wine from this juice. I received some already fermented but seemed quite clouded with pulp. (Full disclosure: I plan on distilling the end product) I processed it (distilled) and it seemed a little scorched, from the pulp I'm sure.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Hoping to wind up with some sort of brandy. We'll see.
 

Blacksmith1

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Basic wine protocols will work. Add juice and pectic enzyme to fermenting vessel. Dilute with water if needed. To stop wild ferment use K-meta. Add yeast nutrient, wait 24 hrs. Add sugar to raise SG if desired. Add yeast. Ferment, rack, rack, rack, distill.
 

bracconiere

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(Full disclosure: I plan on distilling the end product) I processed it (distilled) and it seemed a little scorched, from the pulp I'm sure.
I remember someone on homedistiller,com used a double boiler for their batches... If you have a lot of pulp, might be the solution.
 
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Basic wine protocols will work. Add juice and pectic enzyme to fermenting vessel. Dilute with water if needed. To stop wild ferment use K-meta. Add yeast nutrient, wait 24 hrs. Add sugar to raise SG if desired. Add yeast. Ferment, rack, rack, rack, distill.
Now I've got something to go on. Thanks, guys
 

bernardsmith

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But there should never be any pulp when you have made wine. You should be racking your wine OFF the sediment and into a clean vessel. Any sign of pulp (or lees) is a sign that the wine isn't finished. And wine ain't beer. It will take many weeks - perhaps months - to make a fruit wine. And that's whether the wine is supposed to be finished at 12-14% ABV or you intend to concentrate that alcohol through a still. And while beer is likely to have unfermentable sugars - so even a finished beer tastes sweet, fruit has virtually no unfermentable sugars so unless you really know what you are doing it should taste brut dry when it is ready to bottle (wine makers might stabilize then back sweeten their wine, or they may end with more alcohol than their yeast can tolerate so the yeast quit before all the sugar is fermented, or they might filter out the yeast while there is still sugar remaining) so if your coffee berry wine is sweet it is still fermenting.
 
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cabron99
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Valuable research stuff for me. When I got the juice it was fermented and still had pulp suspended. It smelled of vinegar so I ran it. Probably should have waited as I don't think it was fermenting for very long. Hopping to get unfermented stuff next time. I've got some reading to do, thanks to you guys and or gals. Thanks so much!
 

bernardsmith

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Vinegar occurs when air (oxygen ) is added to alcohol in the presence of acetobacter. You may have vinegar rather than wine. Taste it.
 

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