Will pre-boiling fix this water??

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Vintage Iron

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I'm having problems with high mash ph (I have a meter) due to very hard water. This is causing a very astringent taste to my beers. Would pre-boiling fix my water? I've tried diluting with 3/4 RO water, but still get the high ph and astringency. (Mash Ph is usually in the high 6's before I add lactic acid) If I pre-boil and decant to remove bicarbonate, should I add other minerals? (Like maybe sodium?)

Here is the data from our water report from Ward labs:
Sodium 8ppm
Potassium 1ppm
Calcium 81ppm
Magnesium 34ppm
Total Hardness 344
Sulfate 8ppm
Chloride 18ppm
Carbonate <1.0ppm
Bicarbonate 389ppm (we basically live on a limestone shelf!)
Total Alkalinity 320ppm
Water Ph 7.5

Is there a better way to go rather than boiling 8 gallons of water every time I want to brew? That seems like a pretty energy intensive process.

thanks!
 

day_trippr

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You should have a moderator move this to the Brew Science thread, where the water-wise ones hang out :)

Cheers!
 

Vale71

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If I were you I'd go with 100% RO water and build from there. Boiling will use a lot of energy and won't precipitate as much as you'd need. For example, your magnesium is quite high and you can't remove that just by boiling.
 

day_trippr

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I agree, but the water gurus seem to think acid can fix nearly anything :D
fwiw, I'd front an RO system with a softener for that water...

Cheers!
 
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Vintage Iron

Vintage Iron

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If I were you I'd go with 100% RO water and build from there. Boiling will use a lot of energy and won't precipitate as much as you'd need. For example, your magnesium is quite high and you can't remove that just by boiling.
Thanks. This is actually what I've been leaning towards. Does anyone have a guide (like a recipe book) where one can look up brewing salt additions to RO water based on style?
 

day_trippr

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Bru'n Water provides an extensive list of water "styles" one can target, and as long as the characteristics of the water being used along with the complete grain bill characteristics are entered correctly it will guide the addition of salts and acids to hit a target "style"...

Cheers!
 
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