Why do people use a secondary?

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Joos

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This should be a poll rather than an unending argument.By the way I use secondarys for some beers and I don't for others.FOR NO REASON AT ALL!!muhahahaha
 

FireNightFly

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This should be a poll rather than an unending argument.By the way I use secondarys for some beers and I don't for others.FOR NO REASON AT ALL!!muhahahaha
Thats just evil, just evil!
 

Fingers

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I drink beer that is typically three to four months old. When I rack it out of my secondary there is still a significant amount of sediment on the bottom. As it is, there is still a little bit in the keg when it kicks.

It doesn't take very long to rack to secondary for aging and clearing. Getting that crap out of my keg is worth the extra few minutes. My beer pulls clean from glass one.
 

BigCask

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Why Michael Berta? Why? Aren't there enough threads on this that make the point already?

-BigCask
 

permo

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I just racked my first ever brew from primary (bucket) to secondary, glass carboy. I am seeing after the first few hours that the top portion of the brew is starting to clear as yeast falls to the bottom. I am thinking that one potential benefit could be a clearer/cleaner final product? Also, I would think that an extended secondary fermentation would allow flavors to blend and mellow over time. I am no expert in brewing, but am well versed in the world of cooking and there are many similarities.

I have done a ton of research, and my research indicates that a secondary is not a necessaty to make good homebrew. I consider it just another way to improve your brew....also gives you another opportunity to impart flavors ie..dry hopping, spicing..etc..etc..

but what do I know, I am just starting out!
 

ekranzusch

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heh permo you'll be fine, brewing is definately a lot like cooking IMO. I think it would be tough to be a great brewer if you are a horrible cook. This topic is really just one of personal preference as far as I'm concerned. Both sides have good arguments and points, and both ways have their downsides too. It's all been said before. I'm using a secondary right now purely because I didn't want to bottle right away (a few months ago now lol) and now I got a kegging system so suck it bottles!
 

homebrewer_99

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I just racked my first ever brew from primary (bucket) to secondary, glass carboy. I am seeing after the first few hours that the top portion of the brew is starting to clear as yeast falls to the bottom. I am thinking that one potential benefit could be a clearer/cleaner final product? Also, I would think that an extended secondary fermentation would allow flavors to blend and mellow over time. I am no expert in brewing, but am well versed in the world of cooking and there are many similarities.

I have done a ton of research, and my research indicates that a secondary is not a necessaty to make good homebrew. I consider it just another way to improve your brew....also gives you another opportunity to impart flavors ie..dry hopping, spicing..etc..etc..

but what do I know, I am just starting out!
All good points...exactly the same approach I take to brewing...;)
 
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I just racked my first ever brew from primary (bucket) to secondary, glass carboy. I am seeing after the first few hours that the top portion of the brew is starting to clear as yeast falls to the bottom. I am thinking that one potential benefit could be a clearer/cleaner final product? Also, I would think that an extended secondary fermentation would allow flavors to blend and mellow over time. I am no expert in brewing, but am well versed in the world of cooking and there are many similarities.

I have done a ton of research, and my research indicates that a secondary is not a necessaty to make good homebrew. I consider it just another way to improve your brew....also gives you another opportunity to impart flavors ie..dry hopping, spicing..etc..etc..

but what do I know, I am just starting out!
All good points...exactly the same approach I take to brewing...;)
Yep me too!
Time is our friend in the brewing world, why not use her to out advantage!
Cheers
Jay
 

Scut_Monkey

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I only use a primary when I can but typically I need my primary fermenter back. I think a good number of people use a secondary for reasons such as mine where circumstances and equipment limitations make it most convenient.
 

LTS

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All I know is that I've read a ton of books and they all do it the same way. Clearly if you are not following my process you are doing it wrong! :)

I've used a secondary almost all the time. I do this because I have extra cleaner and sanitizer around and frankly since I do an extra transfer and manage to keep my beers from getting infected I am clearly better than you. :)

Right.. RDWHAHB..
 
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