Who's smoking meat this weekend?

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Testing our new to us smoker over the midsummers day weekend.
Kassler and lamb roast IMG_20240621_104541_029.jpgP_20240621_153753.jpgP_20240621_162036.jpgIMG_20240621_162349_878.jpg
 

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PIcked up some nice ribeye steaks for later.

Cousin thinks we should put a little smoke on them. I think he can smoke his if he wants, just straight up grilled for me.
 
Try a reverse sear. Smoke lightly for maybe an hour then just a quickie on a hot charcoal grill.

That's what he wants to do, and that's fine.

I'm in the mood for just plain old hot seared med/med rare steak. Pretty well marbled prime grade so probably more toward medium. They're only 1" cuts so 4-5 min per side on hot grill should be close for me.
 
Yeah, I wouldn't even think of a reverse sear on a 1" steak. So no smoke & sear method either.

What type of grill? If it's a charcoal grill, I'd get it ripping hot and throw some hardwood chunks in there and once they were burning nicely (no white smoke) still do a hot & fast cook but that'll add a bit of smoke flavor. I.e. you and he can split the difference.
 
The grilling part would be good old Weber kettle with lump charcoal.

I could bring a chunk or two because all he has would be pellets for his recteq smoker.
 
I'm generally not a fan of mesquite because it's easy to overdo. But, in case we decide to grill with a chunk of wood added, that's what I'm going to bring given it should be a relatively brief exposure.
 
Made up a batch of ribs yesterday. At my parents’ second place, and mom told me she had ribs to make. I don’t have my smoker and stuff, so I made do with what I had.
She originally just wanted my bbq sauce recipe, so she’d make them. She was asking about par-boiling them first, then I have an idea she was planning on throwing them in the oven @ 375 for an hour…. 🤢
So I ended up putting a rub on, then into the oven to get started at 225, (had stuff going on so I couldn’t shepherd them the whole time. Then into the gas grill with a smoker box. Took a bit to get temps worked out - I’m not really used to that grill for low temp.
But they ended up pretty tasty.
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The steaks were very tasty with the hint of mesquite. Two small chunks was plenty.
 
got some small hams and canadian bacons out of cure and in fridge for tomorrow smoke. going to be a packed house in the 2x2 foot print. pics in the morning.

will be true test of the smokai cold smoker. along with electric elements in cabinet.
 
Mark, I was looking for the "comments section" to post something, was then going to post it here as commentary on the random link you provided...

...and then I realized that was your blog 😂

It looks delicious!

What I was going to comment was your statement about a full packer brisket. I'm assuming if you're on here and have a smoker, you have a food saver? If not, I highly recommend buying one. Especially if you have kids.

So solution 1 to the "full packer" problem being too much: I find it's the perfect thing to smoke "too much" meat and then just portion it out, seal, and freeze it. For Father's Day I did a 19# full packer for 7 people--WAY too much for us. But now I've got 5# of brisket in 1# bags in the freezer for other projects. Likewise when I do pulled pork I'll get two 2-packs of pork butt from Costco, a total of about 34-35# of meat. That makes a LOT of vacuum sealed bags of smoked pork for future meals. So that's solution 1 to having "too much" meat for your family. Doesn't solve the "not fond of the point" statement, but the following paragraph might?

Solution 2 is this... Grind the point. I find it's hard to get ground beef with enough fat for burgers. I like to cook my burgers to 150 or so IT, and you need fat in there to keep it juicy at those temps. So I've got a grinding attachment for my wife's Kitchenaid stand mixer. When I have a use for a brisket flat, I just buy a full packer anyway. I pull the point off and grind it [roughly] 50/50 with chuck roast, and again those get portioned out, vacuum sealed, and thrown in the freezer as "Brad's burger blend." And then I have the flat for whatever I wanted to do with it.

Like you point out, smaller flat cuts are hard to find and expensive, both because it's the "preferred" cut for things like pastrami / corned beef and because it comes pre-trimmed usually. But my local Costco always has some Prime full packers of various sizes, well-priced, and I don't mind doing some knife work to get the flat trimmed exactly how I want and use for the point for burger blend.
 
Here is a 9.92# brisket trimmed and seasoned, going on the Weber kettle at 7.2#. should be good for 8-10 hours at 225-250°.

Using Kingsford charcoal briquettes and pecan wood on an 18" grill surface...

Happy 4th of July e'erybody!
 

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i usually make these poor mans burnt ends with chuck roast. if you havent tried this i suggest you do.

https://heygrillhey.com/poor-mans-burnt-ends/

but i have found that using this technique . ie. dry rubbing on a mustard binder then slow smoking for a few hours then essentially pan steaming them for a few hours then glazing for an hour works really really well on almost anything. especially pork.

i tried it yesterday with rib tips and it was amazing.

dry rub recipe: gsp, brown sugar, paprika and the secret ingredient : instant coffee
 
2 racks of baby back ribs going on for the 3-2-1 method of smoking ribs. I like my ribs with a little extra sweet and heat but my wife says anything I cook is too spicy aka hot. I say all the time, that she thinks water is too spicy. So her rack of ribs is going to be totally plain, no salt or pepper, nothing. But she will still complain …
 
Took today off and that makes it too long of a weekend to not go at least twice.

For America's birthday we had burgers and freedom tots and some apa... Sorry, no pics.

Today we did street tacos and margaritas.

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Tomorrow I will be doing a brisket. It was a 19# packer and after cutting the point from the flat and trimming some fat, I think I might be looking at a ~10 lb point.

I'll take pics and whatnot if I remember.
 
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i usually make these poor mans burnt ends with chuck roast. if you havent tried this i suggest you do.

https://heygrillhey.com/poor-mans-burnt-ends/

but i have found that using this technique . ie. dry rubbing on a mustard binder then slow smoking for a few hours then essentially pan steaming them for a few hours then glazing for an hour works really really well on almost anything. especially pork.

i tried it yesterday with rib tips and it was amazing.

dry rub recipe: gsp, brown sugar, paprika and the secret ingredient : instant coffee
Pork belly burnt ends are also a great "budget" version. I did it a couple years ago for the Super Bowl with I think two or three different sauces/glazes. One was traditional BBQ, one was something Asian (I forget what I used), and then there was a third as well IIRC that I don't remember.
 
It's not "smoked" but this is the cooking thread I hang out in, so I figured I'd post this here.

This is from J. Kenji Lopez-Alt's book The Wok. My wife bought me the book a while ago but this is the first thing we've made.

it's Sichuan Double Cooked Pork Belly stir fry with Leeks and Scallions.

Delicious. One of the best things I've cooked... If the rest of this book is similar--and it's Kenji, so I'm sure it is--I highly recommend it.

1720458004972.png
 
It's not "smoked" but this is the cooking thread I hang out in, so I figured I'd post this here.

This is from J. Kenji Lopez-Alt's book The Wok. My wife bought me the book a while ago but this is the first thing we've made.

it's Sichuan Double Cooked Pork Belly stir fry with Leeks and Scallions.

Delicious. One of the best things I've cooked... If the rest of this book is similar--and it's Kenji, so I'm sure it is--I highly recommend it.

View attachment 852564
That looks awesome, so of course I'm making it asap.

Also, off topic. Reported.
 
It's not "smoked" but this is the cooking thread I hang out in, so I figured I'd post this here.

This is from J. Kenji Lopez-Alt's book The Wok. My wife bought me the book a while ago but this is the first thing we've made.

it's Sichuan Double Cooked Pork Belly stir fry with Leeks and Scallions.

Delicious. One of the best things I've cooked... If the rest of this book is similar--and it's Kenji, so I'm sure it is--I highly recommend it.

View attachment 852564
BTW, I bought a stir-fry book and recommended it to my oriental tennis partner (it was partially philosphy, partially recipes - Stir-Frying to the Skies Edge). Her response was so funny. "Uh, there are no stir fry recipes - you just get the pan hot and start tossing stuff in there). LOL.
 
Cooking up some lamb steak atm.
We're on my wifes family's summer vacation cottage, and it's an old rusted to s**t landmann grill, but I'm doing my best.
Seared over coals briefly then put on indirect heat, with a few twigs of juniper thrown on the coal every now and then for a little smokey flavour...
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