White Lab Yeast

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

jmarx13

Active Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2014
Messages
29
Reaction score
0
I brewed Yesterday...as the instructions said I had the yeast at room temp for about 5 hours before the I was ready to put in the wort.
I opened a poured in the wort in the fermentation bucket. Should I have mixed it. I didnt and 26 hours later the airlock isnt moving.

I did aerate before I poured the yeast in.
 

BBL_Brewer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2011
Messages
3,689
Reaction score
442
Location
Kokomo
No, you don't have to mix it. It will take off, just give it time. It helps to make a yeast starter before you pitch it to a batch of beer. No worries though. If you are fermenting in a bucket, sometimes the lids leak a little and the air lock won't bubble. My buckets leak and airlock activity is hit and his anymore.
 

dobe12

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 9, 2011
Messages
903
Reaction score
216
Location
Jersey
Fermentation can take up to 72hrs to start. Since you didn't make a starter, that yeast is multiplying/growing to what it needs to ferment your batch. There's lots of yeast sex going on in your fermentor right now :ban:
When they've made enough yeast babies, they'll go to work.

Also, you don't need to warm up the yeast before pitching. Just an FYI.

Read up on starters and get into making them. When you pitch the proper amount of yeast, you'll notice faster starts to fermentation.

:mug:
 

unionrdr

Homebrewer, author & air gun collector
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2011
Messages
39,136
Reaction score
3,799
Location
Sheffield
If the yeast is stored in the fridge,you do indeed need to take it out & let it warm up to room temp before pitching in a starter or batch of beer. I've had white labs vials take a day & a half to get going. But a couple times I did get the wort chilled down too much. So watch those pitch temps as well.
 

duboman

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2011
Messages
6,365
Reaction score
517
Location
Glenview
If the yeast is stored in the fridge,you do indeed need to take it out & let it warm up to room temp before pitching in a starter or batch of beer. I've had white labs vials take a day & a half to get going. But a couple times I did get the wort chilled down too much. So watch those pitch temps as well.

Sorry, you absolutely do not need the yeast to warm up, there is no issue pitching cold yeast into warmer wort and is actually preferred for a controlled growth phase.

The problem comes when you put warm yeast into cold wort.

I pull all my starters from the fridge just before pitch, simply decant and swirl and pitch.

All my beers take off in 6-12 hours and reach full attenuation with no I'll effects.

Rehydrating dry yeast is a different story though;)


Sent from the Commune
 

unionrdr

Homebrewer, author & air gun collector
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2011
Messages
39,136
Reaction score
3,799
Location
Sheffield
I don't like to use cold yeast in 80F+ Wort,whether starter or batch. Not a good habit to get into imo.Who's to say that pitching cold yeast into warm wort either way is ok? It's against what is commonly taught or thought?...
 

duboman

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2011
Messages
6,365
Reaction score
517
Location
Glenview
I don't like to use cold yeast in 80F+ Wort,whether starter or batch. Not a good habit to get into imo.Who's to say that pitching cold yeast into warm wort either way is ok? It's against what is commonly taught or thought?...
Well, nobody should be pitching yeast into 80 degree wort regardless, too hot.

Because the yeast is essentially dormant coming out of the fridge there is no harm in pitching it cold. It will naturally warm up as it gets active in the wort. I know plenty of respected brewers both home and pro that practice this method with great results, me included. Give it a try sometime:)

Sent from my SM-T310 using Home Brew mobile app
 

unionrdr

Homebrewer, author & air gun collector
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2011
Messages
39,136
Reaction score
3,799
Location
Sheffield
My concern here is shocking the yeast. And many PDF's I've read say to re-hydrate in water that's 90-105F. I prefer 75F or so. But it's always been said to let it come up to room temp first & it works for me.
 

duboman

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2011
Messages
6,365
Reaction score
517
Location
Glenview
If you are using rehydrated dry yeast then yes, you want it close to wort temp to avoid shocking it but I'm speaking if liquid yeast from a crashed starter, sorry if there was a miscommunication:)


Sent from the Commune
 

dobe12

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 9, 2011
Messages
903
Reaction score
216
Location
Jersey
Agreeing with duboman, it isn't necessary to warm up yeast before pitching. Rapidly cooling can shock the yeast, so going that way is a concern, but going from cold to warm is not. That doesn't mean you can not let it warm. It's just not necessary.

I used to let it warm up, but have been told by several home and commercial brewers with WAY more experience than me that it's not a problem.
 
Top