Which Hop Types to Grow?

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JayC

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I know a lot of people have started this topic, but most of them seem to have asked what to grow based on their soil/geography. My question is, if I could only grow 2-3 types with the area I have available, what should I grow to allow me to brew a variety of beers? I'm thinking Willamette for American/English Ales and Mt Hood for American/German Lagers, +/- Cascades just because I hear they grow so well. Any thoughts?
 

Got Trub?

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That sounds like a resaonable selection.

I have Willamete and Cascade and just ordered some Hallertau and Tettnang which pretty much covers all the styles I brew.

GT
 
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Got Trub? said:
That sounds like a resaonable selection.

I have Willamete and Cascade and just ordered some Hallertau and Tettnang which pretty much covers all the styles I brew.

GT
Where did you get the plants (or seeds). I've been looking for some to grow, but the places I've found were out, and were not specific on the type of hops plants they were selling.
 

EvilTOJ

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There's plenty of threads on how to order rhizomes. Rhizomes are plant rootlings that can be transplanted.
 

david_42

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OP - Those sound good. You might consider Nugget instead of Mt. Hood.

MB - You have to order root cuttings (AKA rhizomes) from brewing suppliers. The ornamentals you'll find at garden stores can be almost anything and are as likely to be male plants as female. Seeds are useless, hops do not breed true.
 

Homercidal

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Check out http://www.freshhops.com

They will have rhizomes in stock in March. They usually have a good selection, but it's a bit early to order yet. I hear Cascade grow very well pretty much most places, and I think any strain will do well if you take good care of them. most home growers can spend the time to trim and fertilize and provide proper aeration, so the plants don't get the diseases.

Here is a link to a PDF describing some good growing practices. It's geared towards a family farm, but the information in there is worth reading for anyone.
 

mot

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THere are some that grow better than others, but I think it is going to come down to how you take care of them and your weather for the season in your area. Im sure alot of people are getting into this the first year to since the shortage.

I am growing
1 cascade
2 centennial
1 mt hood
1 sterling saaz
1 golding
1 willamette

and then just hope they turn out to go into next year
 

Bromley

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I ordered three rhizomes each of Cascade (for American Ales), Goldings (English Ales), and Mt. Hood (German schtuff).
 
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JayC

JayC

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I ended up pre-ordering 2 each of Cascade, Willamette and Mt Hood from Midwest Supplies. I didn't want to have to wait around until they were in season to start ordering. We just got over a foot of snow over the weekend, so I'm in no hurry to plant, anyway. Since ordering, I've looked in the CJOHB, and it rates Mt Hood storability as poor. Does anyone have any experience with stocking up on Mt Hood's and did they go south rapidly?
 

mykayel

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You can plant them in a pot indoors instead of storing it in your fridge. That would also give it a little head start when you transplant it outdoors once your past your last frost.
 

The Pol

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Papazian sayes that if you FREEZE green hops that they store VERY WELL. Id say, take what you will need this year and dry them, the others, freeze them green and dry them next year to use in your recipes. Worth a shot!
 

kenb

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The Pol said:
Papazian sayes that if you FREEZE green hops that they store VERY WELL. Id say, take what you will need this year and dry them, the others, freeze them green and dry them next year to use in your recipes. Worth a shot!
You need to dry them out first though. I dried mine out last year in my food dehydrator for about 8 hours, and they kept real well in the freezer over the winter. It is not recommended to freeze them without drying them first.
 

The Pol

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Okay, you didnt read what I wrote... Papazian sayes that hops are more stable during storage if you leave them WET (green) then FREEZE them. Get the book, it is in there. After they are dried, they are not as stable when frozen... Per Papazian. Sounds like a recommendation to me?
 

Danek

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The Pol said:
Papazian sayes that hops are more stable during storage if you leave them WET (green) then FREEZE them. Get the book, it is in there. After they are dried, they are not as stable when frozen... Per Papazian. Sounds like a recommendation to me?
That surprises me a little bit - if you freeze them wet, won't the water content expand and destroy the cell walls, meaning the defrosted hops will be kind of sludgy? If Charlie P says it I assume he knows what he's talking about, but it does seem a little counterintuitive.
 

kenb

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The Pol said:
Okay, you didnt read what I wrote... Papazian sayes that hops are more stable during storage if you leave them WET (green) then FREEZE them. Get the book, it is in there. After they are dried, they are not as stable when frozen... Per Papazian. Sounds like a recommendation to me?
Don't take Charlie P as gospel about everything. Shaw is much more accurate. But aside from that, if you freeze them wet, they will very likely will get freezer burn. Also makes it very difficult to measure them accurately for a recipe once you thaw them out, as how will you know how much water is left and constituting their weight?
I love fresh green hops, but but see no benefit to freezing them without drying them.
 

Moonpile

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Danek said:
That surprises me a little bit - if you freeze them wet, won't the water content expand and destroy the cell walls, meaning the defrosted hops will be kind of sludgy? If Charlie P says it I assume he knows what he's talking about, but it does seem a little counterintuitive.
Wouldn't destroying the cell walls actually increase utilization in the same way that pellets are more effective than whole cones?
 
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