Quantcast

Where do I get 17G of sanitzed water?

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

RoseburgBrewer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2008
Messages
47
Reaction score
0
Location
Pendleton, OR
I've been brewing small 5G batches for the past 2 years, and recently got a 15G minibrew fermenter. So I decided to make a keggle and start brewing 15G batches. When I did 5G batches I would just go to the grocery store and get 6Gs of distilled water and use that for brewing. Now that I'm doing large batches what it is the best, most economical way to get sanitized water. There is a water supply store in town that says they filter there water 12 times before they sell it in 5G carboys, but will that work? I've heard of hooking up filters to your tap water, I have a brita will that work or do I need a special type of filter?
 

cheezydemon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 13, 2007
Messages
1,917
Reaction score
15
Location
The "Ville"
I use plain tap water with no ill effects. That is HERE not THERE. But I would definitely try it sooner than later. If you find that it is OK then you will save a ton of time, money and trouble.
 

sirsloop

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2006
Messages
2,587
Reaction score
24
Location
South River, NJ
You shouldn't be using sanitized or distilled for brewing in the first place!!! Tap water has vital nutrients that your yeast need! Keep in mind you are boiling this water for like an hour... that will kill ANYTHING thats in the water.
 

cge0

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2007
Messages
73
Reaction score
0
Boiling doesn't kill everything. However, homebrewing doesn't require sterile conditions. I've done plenty of stupid things which were less than sanitary, and I've yet to have a contam. Granted you should still be careful. I use RO/DI water, since I used to have an aquarium, and my fermentation is pretty good. Keep in mind yeast are very resourceful when it comes to staying alive.
 

Brewtopia

"Greenwood Aged Beer"
Joined
Oct 20, 2006
Messages
2,295
Reaction score
26
Location
Seattle, WA
I just use plain ol' tap water in my boil. In cases where I may need/want to waterback post boil, I use bottled drinking water.
 

Bobby_M

Vendor and Brewer
HBT Sponsor
Joined
Aug 3, 2006
Messages
24,824
Reaction score
3,498
Location
Whitehouse Station
The water answers are correct but um, how exactly are you planning to boil 15 gallons in a 15 gallon pot? The same can be said for the fermenter. You will at most be able to pull off 12 gallon batches to leave enough headroom in both the kettle and the fermenter.
 

Deofol

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2007
Messages
93
Reaction score
3
+1 on tap water. I use mine throughout my enitre process. Not a bad batch yet, but then again my water taste fine right out of the tap.

FWIW, if your tap water taste OK, use it. If not, get water from the store.
 

Professor Frink

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 20, 2006
Messages
3,100
Reaction score
30
Location
Beacon, NY
I used bottled water when I was doing extract brewing, but once I bumped up to all-grain, I've just been using plain old tap water. I've noticed no difference.
 

srm775

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2007
Messages
1,370
Reaction score
4
Location
IL
If your water is fine to drink and tastes fine, then use it. Otherwise, you can install whole-house water pre-filters, which will remove sediment and chlorine/chloramine.

But, as Bobby pointed out, your bigger problem is your batch size.
 

ohiobrewtus

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 1, 2006
Messages
7,762
Reaction score
72
Location
Ohio
Some recommend using spring water. I also just use my tap water, although I've recently started playing with my water to mimic certain styles.

Oh and Bobby's right. You can't do 15g batches in a keggle. You need to have room for a nice rolling boil, and there will be boil off.
 
OP
RoseburgBrewer

RoseburgBrewer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2008
Messages
47
Reaction score
0
Location
Pendleton, OR
Thanks guys it sounds like Tap water is the way to go. And thanks for the tip on headspace. Is a little chlorine in the tap water something to be concerned about?
 

Bobby_M

Vendor and Brewer
HBT Sponsor
Joined
Aug 3, 2006
Messages
24,824
Reaction score
3,498
Location
Whitehouse Station
You can treat your tap water with some campden tablets to break the chlorine down quickly. You can also let it sit in a bucket overnight and that will allow it to evaporate out.
 

budbo

Beer is good
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Feb 6, 2006
Messages
2,294
Reaction score
21
Location
La Plata, MD
chlorine, if your local supply uses gas, will boil out with no effect on the final product

chloramine will not boil out, My tap water has excessive ammounts that some yeast create the ever popular "bandaid" taste from. I bought a $20 Britta Filter and that took care of it.

Soft water with nutrients added also works well, If you really don't want to use tap at all the cheapest way is to get a local water service, most give you a free hot/cold dispenser and deliver it in 5 gallon bottles to your door :)
 
Top