When to add glucoamylase?

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BangladeshBrewer

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I have 4 kg malt barley 1kg oats to go into a kettle with a maximum capacity of 30 litres. Obviously, I will leave space and have some sterile water ready just in case.

I have US-05 yeast which I will rehydrate into room temperature sterile water. I have a packet of glucoamylase.

My idea is that I heat up the water to about 160 F and then add the grain/malt into my boil in the bag. Then I keep it at around 153-155 for a hour with some stirring.


[QUESTION 1]

When do I add the glucoamylase, which I want to use to increase the conversion of starch?

Do I add it into the mash bag after the hour of mashing? or do I first dump the grain/oats? This is my first time so I'm asking the stupid questions.

The glucoamylase says packet says it wants below 140 F temperature. So I am guessing I do that after the mash hour when the temperature drops to the right range.

[QUESTION 2]

After all the mashing and glucoamylase time is passed, do I bring the whole mixture up to the boil? ie to kill off any nasties.

[QUESTION 3]

I cool the mixture as fast as possible, in a bath of ice, while preserving sanitisation to get down to the pitching temperature for the yeast. I'm going to ferment in the same vessel, which has a space to add a brewing lock.

Then I wait for the brewing to finish over however many days (4-5 or whatever). After that I can distil.

Does this sound right?
 
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BangladeshBrewer

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I got the mash to 62 degrees C for about ten minutes, decided it was too low, got it up to 65-67c. It finished the hour at 62-63 C.

When the temperature dropped to about 60 or below I added the glucoamylese. I'm leaving that in for an hour.

Then I will boil the beer to kill the enzymes.

Then I will quickly cool the kettle to the temperature the yeast wants (12 degrees to 25 degrees C) and pitch the yeast, which I'm reviving and bringing to that temperature approx. The kettle is my fermenting vessel, adding an airlock into a port.

I am doing everything in a sanitary way.
 

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