Wheat fermentation temps...

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arover

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When I return back to school, I'm brewing this standard wheat (going to add some fruit extract later on) kit I got at my LHBS. I don't exactly remember what strain of yeast it came with, but it was dry, and I'm pretty sure it was Coopers. My question is, what fermentation temps are best for wheats? I've heard higher is better, but I'm wondering if, since I'm going to be adding some raspberry flavor to it, I should modify the ferment temp a little to give a lighter flavor to complement the raspberry (or not). What temps (environmental) have worked for you all when brewing fruit wheats? Also, I didn't do this with my first batch that used dry yeast, but should I pitch the yeast in some warm water ahead of time? I've read in a few places it's recommended, but I hesitate because it leaves more room for contamination/infection...So what are the pros/cons?

Also, my 2nd batch (Cream ale) is going to be transferred to a 2ndary (to make room for my next batch) pretty soon. It's been recommended that I should do the secondary fermentation at cooler temps, but how cool works? My closet gets around 50-60, I was thinking of keeping it in there. What you guys think? I'm bringing a mini fridge up, I'm pretty sure it'll fit my glass carboy, but should I be putting the ale in that low of temps?

After being finished obsessing over the initial noob stage of "IS MY FERMENTATION GOING!?" i'm now entering the noob stage of "WHAT IS THE TEMP GOING TO DO TO MY BEER!?" :D
 

DuffmanAK

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I'd think the temp more depends on your yeast than the brew as a whole. If you have Coopers, I'd shoot for 65-70F. If I recall, everytime I've used Coopers, it went absolutely crazy in the fermentor, so be sure to hook up a blowoff tube at least for the first few days, otherwise you may come home to find a not so nice surprise.

I'd think 50-60 is fine in secondary. The primary purpose of secondary is to just let the beer clear more. You only need to get a little concerned with temps when you're in the high 70s range. Also keep in mind, the surface of the carboy may read 70F, but internally it'll be warmer during fermentation.
 
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arover

arover

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I'd think the temp more depends on your yeast than the brew as a whole. If you have Coopers, I'd shoot for 65-70F. If I recall, everytime I've used Coopers, it went absolutely crazy in the fermentor, so be sure to hook up a blowoff tube at least for the first few days, otherwise you may come home to find a not so nice surprise.

I'd think 50-60 is fine in secondary. The primary purpose of secondary is to just let the beer clear more. You only need to get a little concerned with temps when you're in the high 70s range. Also keep in mind, the surface of the carboy may read 70F, but internally it'll be warmer during fermentation.
I only ask about the secondary temp specifically for this batch, since I've found it to be recommended that a cream ale rest at "lager" temps after the initial fermentation.
 
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