Wheat Beer in Secondary?

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HuffDaddy

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Is there any benefit to me moving my beer to a secondary carboy after fermentation is over? I've seen different opinions and I curious what people on here think.

Thanks,
Chris
 

Joos

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well I'm sure this thread will restart the debate.But a wheat beer has no need for a secondary.Won't hurt it either.
 

aubrey

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I'm going to secondary the wit I have in primary now because I didn't do a good job of keeping trub out of the carboy and don't want my beer sitting on it for a couple weeks.
 

Andreas

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Is there any benefit to me moving my beer to a secondary carboy after fermentation is over? I've seen different opinions and I curious what people on here think.

Chris,
I think that it depends on what you want. I'm not familiar with the former debate on the subject here. I'm an inexperienced (6 batches) homebrewer but I used to live in Austria and drank my share of wheat beers! :)
There are different styles of wheat beer. Not all of them are the "Hefeweizen" style with yeast in the bottle. Some are as clear as a light lager. If I recall correctly, they had labels like "Kristallweizen" and "Champagnerweizen" (although I imagine the EU has since prevented the latter to be used as a label). I've brewed 3 batches (lagers) now that have rested in secondary carboys for 3 weeks or more -- one effect is to clarify your beer. So if this is how you want your Weizen, go for it. Just be aware that if your goal is "naturtrüb", then this isn't the recommended method, unless you're planning to pitch yeast later by some method (that I haven't learned yet).
-Andy
 

homebrewer_99

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As someone who lived in Gemrnay for 9 years, been drinking them since 1975, and brewing them since 1994, I will tell you that I secondary my HWs.

Reason is to transfer less yeast to the bottles. I will rack a fairly clear beer to the bottling bucket and add only a small amount of yeast into the brew. Just enough to make it cloudy again. This leaves plenty of yeast in the carboy and produces a cleaner flavor. ;)
 

Bopper

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For a wheat I'd go 3-4 weeks primary then straight to keg.
 
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HuffDaddy

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I'm brewing a Bell's Oberon clone, so I guess I'll be wanting to go for a "cloudier" beer.
 

SeamusMac

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My wheat beer is in the secondary right now and looks exceptionally clear and delicious. I've read all over the forums that bulk aging beer is the way to go and I'll soon find out myself!
 

Andreas

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As someone who lived in Gemrnay for 9 years,
Which wheat do you miss the most?
-Andy
P.S. the technique that you described would give a Hefeweizen as a result --- do you recall drinking any wheats "ohne Hefe" -- i.e. Kristall, Champagner, etc.
 
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I'd like to revivie this thread... I am brewing my first wheat beer and it is the first beer that I have instructions that DONT include putting it in secondary. For every beer I have brewed so far (which is only 4), I have used a secondary fermenter. This recipe says to ferment in primary for two weeks and then bottle. If I do this, is it still okay that I add priming sugar, or will it make bottle bombs? Should I just say "screw the recipe" and put it in secondary for a week or two anyway? I really did a terrible job at holding back any trub and I'm a bit worried about not racking. Still, I would like a somewhat cloudy beer and would rather not have to pitch more yeast like homebrewer_99 said.
 
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