what's the difference between applewine and cider

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Suthrncomfrt1884

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Apfelwein is a german cider. As far as differences...it really depends on what cider you're comparing it to. If you've ever had Original Sin Cider, then EdWort's Apfelwein is almost the same thing but a bit more dry. Apfelwein tastes more like a champagne when carbonated (never had it uncarbed) than cider. Cider is a bit more sweet and most good ciders have a bit of malt in them. This is just my experience though...I'm sure there's plenty of good ciders that don't use malt.
 

Yooper

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To my mind, the term "cider" refers to apples only, no sugar added during fermentation with an ABV of 5-7%. Apple wine is a wine made out of apples, usually 11.5-13%.

Apfelwein is a German cider.
 

Pappers_

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+1 to Southern, Yoop and Bobby. I think the 7 or 8% abv level is a good division. To get above that will require quite a bit of sugars or other additional fermentables. Also, I think most people who make wine from apples usually let it get pretty dry, while many (not all) ciders tend to have some sweetness.
 

Edcculus

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Cider is a bit more sweet and most good ciders have a bit of malt in them. This is just my experience though...I'm sure there's plenty of good ciders that don't use malt.
I've never heard of this...

BrandonO makes a cider with malt, but any good commercial cider will not contain malt...only apple juice and maybe some sugar to get the ABV up a little bit.
 

Suthrncomfrt1884

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I've never heard of this...

BrandonO makes a cider with malt, but any good commercial cider will not contain malt...only apple juice and maybe some sugar to get the ABV up a little bit.
I could be wrong. I thought I had seen a lot of clone recipes floating around that contained malt. I'm not a big cider brewer though, so I'm not possitive.
 

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Ooh... just stumbled on this thread.

So there's this friend of mine, a serious foodie, who has spent a fair amount of time in the UK (and has family there).

She swears that (apple) cider produced in the states is "too sweet" and that she prefers ciders produced in the UK.

If I were to brew something for her, I'm thinking it would be closer to an apfelwein?

Having not done the taste test myself, I'm not sure of what a good example of a British hard cider would be compared to something like Woodchuck?

Just curious.
 

the_bird

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Edcculus

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Ooh... just stumbled on this thread.

So there's this friend of mine, a serious foodie, who has spent a fair amount of time in the UK (and has family there).

She swears that (apple) cider produced in the states is "too sweet" and that she prefers ciders produced in the UK.

If I were to brew something for her, I'm thinking it would be closer to an apfelwein?

Having not done the taste test myself, I'm not sure of what a good example of a British hard cider would be compared to something like Woodchuck?

Just curious.
If you were to just get apple juice from the store, and ferment that dry, it would taste a lot like Edworts Applewine. If you got a blend of cider apples and paid attention to acidity/pH, you would end up with something more in the vein of Samuel Smith's Cider, or Aspall. Probably slightly dryer than either if you let it ferment all the way.

British Ciders are a lot drier than most of the mainstream ciders here in the states. Woodchuck et al are filtered and blended back with sweeteners. You can find good English Ciders here, but it sometimes takes some looking.
 
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