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What's the current buzz on Ellagic Acid (and Ellagitannins) as an antioxidant for beer brewing?

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Larry Sayre, Developer of 'Mash Made Easy'
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Ellagic Acid, often referred to as one of the super antioxidants, is found to naturally reside within certain fruits, and interestingly enough, in Whisky that has been aged in Oak barrels. It is readily available in powder form. Discussions are seen for it on another beer brewing forum. Has anyone on this forum given it a go yet, and if so, what results did you achieve?

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/jib.70
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellagic_acid
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellagitannin
https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/jf8012713
 
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Sounds fascinating. The possibility adds dimensions to the IPA's that were barrel-aged a year before being transported across oceans.
 
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It at least potentially may become an alternative to Brewtan B. ???
 
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Vale71

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Sounds fascinating. The possibility adds dimensions to the IPA's that were barrel-aged a year before being transported across oceans.
Not really. Before stainless steel replaced wood beer barrels were lined with pitch in order to avoid direct contact between beer and wood and to reduce oxygen ingress, unlike spirits and wines which were aged in direct contact with the wood.
 
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Quercetin is a potential superoxide scavenger and antioxidant that might be of interest to a qualified professional researcher in this arena.
 
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Not really. Before stainless steel replaced wood beer barrels were lined with pitch in order to avoid direct contact between beer and wood and to reduce oxygen ingress, unlike spirits and wines which were aged in direct contact with the wood.
I have been thinking about this and I wonder why no one mentions the pitch flavor when they talk about beer-specifically IPA's sent to India. It is a distinct flavor when one considers wines that are aged/fermented in pitched wood barrels like Retsina.
 

Vale71

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That's because pitch made from tar imparts no flavor at all.
 

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Whatever formulation you get, I would mix into a growler for a week and do a blind taste test with + without Ellagic acid.

At the end of the day, all that matters is the taste. So 1st thing to check is does it impart any 'flavors'
 

madscientist451

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Ellagic Acid, often referred to as one of the super antioxidants, is found to naturally reside within certain fruits, and interestingly enough, in Whisky that has been aged in Oak barrels. It is readily available in powder form. Discussions are seen for it on another beer brewing forum.
Thanks for posting, I've never heard of it.
Just yesterday, I listened to a podcast about adding sulfites when kegging, like you would do when you bottle wine.
.3 grams for 5 gallons was the recommended amount. The results of their trial were somewhat inconclusive.
Are the discussions on the other forum providing amounts and if it works better than sulfite?
 
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Thanks for posting, I've never heard of it.
Just yesterday, I listened to a podcast about adding sulfites when kegging, like you would do when you bottle wine.
.3 grams for 5 gallons was the recommended amount. The results of their trial were somewhat inconclusive.
Are the discussions on the other forum providing amounts and if it works better than sulfite?
I believe it is substituting for Brewtan-B in an antioxidant blend which also includes sodium metabisulfite and ascorbic acid. No clue or guarantee as to whether or not it is actually a viable substitute.
 
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