what would happen if i threw some yeast in a bottle of juice?

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ArcaneXor

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You'll probably want to stay away from fermenting random things - who knows what fermentation by-products are produced that may not exactly be healthy. I do know that people use Mountain Dew in some beers, but I haven't heard anything about colas fermenting into anything drinkable (if they ferment at all).
 

CBBaron

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ArcaneXor said:
You'll probably want to stay away from fermenting random things - who knows what fermentation by-products are produced that may not exactly be healthy. I do know that people use Mountain Dew in some beers, but I haven't heard anything about colas fermenting into anything drinkable (if they ferment at all).
I doubt you are going to make any food safe beverage much worse for you by fermentation. The resulting beverages may not taste too good but the yeast do not produce much are far as harmful byproducts.

Fermented juice is called wine. :)
Most fruit juices you find in a store have considerably less sugar than wine grapes so the result will be a weak wine with little body. Also the flavors left are often not that tasty. Still many people do make decent to good wine recipes from store fruit juices. Check out http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/ for lots of good recipes and tips.

Fermenting carbonated beverages is a different type of problem. Soda is very acidic and the additives including carbonation make it very difficult for yeast to grow. In addition think about what that soda will taste like flat, dry and with alcohol. I don't think many of them will be worth drinking if you can get them to ferment.

If you read through the Jack Keller site you will see that just about any fruit, vegetable or juice can be used to make wine. Some do require special considerations and flavorings added to make a drinkable product.

Craig
 
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