What type of brew is this, all grain, partial mash etc?

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

Grampz

New Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2010
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Location
NS Canada
I've been making this brew from a local wine/beer shop for a few years now. I like it, family and friends like it, its easy on the stomach and so on. I've been reading posts and articles, and I must say the scientists and physicists among us have some awfully complicated concepts. After reading sometimes, I need to tap into one of my kegs and clear my head. Anyway, I'm curious as to what I'm actually brewing here, I'm posting the ingredients and a bare outline of the process. I'd appreciate your insight.

Canadian Light Summer Ale

400g Canadian 2 Row Pale Malt

1.5kg Light Liquid Unhopped Malt Extract

1.36kg High Malt Glucose

6g Northern Brewer boiling Hops

4g Northern Brewer finishing Hops

Nottingham Dry Ale Yeast *or*

American Liquid Yeast
-----------------------------------------------------

Bring 4l water to 160f, steep grain for 20 minutes

Remove grain, add LME and HMG, bring to boil for 30 minutes

Add boiling hops

Add finishing hops for last 2 minutes of boil

Pour into fermenting pail, add water to 23l mark

When temp below 80f, add yeast

When krausen develops holes or 5 days pass, rack into carboy

When beer clears, bottle or keg
 

mkyl428

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Mar 5, 2013
Messages
921
Reaction score
232
Location
OKC
This is a partial mash a partial mash to put it simply means that part of your fermentable sugars are coming from extract (liquid extract) and part of them are coming from grain (2-Row).
 

mkyl428

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Mar 5, 2013
Messages
921
Reaction score
232
Location
OKC
I'm not sure how much fermentable sugar is coming from that small amount of 2-Row though and that short of a steep so it may be considered extract with steeping grains, how ever i think when base malt (2-row) gets involved it is considered partial mash. I am sure someone will correct me if I'm wrong, but this is my understanding

Oh and welcome to the forums!
 

flars

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 21, 2011
Messages
8,625
Reaction score
2,055
Location
Medford, Wisconsin
I would call it an, "extract with specialty steeping grains". Holding the grains at 160°F is to high of a temperature to convert starches to fermentable sugars. Steeping the grains at this temperature contributes color and flavor to the beer.

Hold this amount of grains between 148° and 154°F for an hour, in approximately 1.25 liters of water, would be a mash. The recipe would then be a "partial mash", where the grains are contributing fermentable sugars along with color and flavor.
 

unionrdr

Homebrewer, author & air gun collector
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2011
Messages
39,152
Reaction score
3,797
Location
Sheffield
I've been making this brew from a local wine/beer shop for a few years now. I like it, family and friends like it, its easy on the stomach and so on. I've been reading posts and articles, and I must say the scientists and physicists among us have some awfully complicated concepts. After reading sometimes, I need to tap into one of my kegs and clear my head. Anyway, I'm curious as to what I'm actually brewing here, I'm posting the ingredients and a bare outline of the process. I'd appreciate your insight.

Canadian Light Summer Ale

400g Canadian 2 Row Pale Malt

1.5kg Light Liquid Unhopped Malt Extract

1.36kg High Malt Glucose

6g Northern Brewer boiling Hops

4g Northern Brewer finishing Hops

Nottingham Dry Ale Yeast *or*

American Liquid Yeast
-----------------------------------------------------

Bring 4l water to 160f, steep grain for 20 minutes

Remove grain, add LME and HMG, bring to boil for 30 minutes

Add boiling hops

Add finishing hops for last 2 minutes of boil

Pour into fermenting pail, add water to 23l mark

When temp below 80f, add yeast

When krausen develops holes or 5 days pass, rack into carboy

When beer clears, bottle or keg
I Agree, the way the recipe is brewed, it's E/SG, or Extract with Steeping Grains. But using 2-row (a base malt) in a steeping recipe will give starch haze, maybe some color. 2-row must be converted in a mash between, say 147-153F for one hour in 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 quarts of water per pound of grain. This allows the enzymes in the malt to convert the starches in the grains to simple sugars the yeast can ferment.
 
Top