What Pressure to Dispense with Beer Gas?

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Rudeboy

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OK I've got my stout faucet installed. I've got my English Summer Ale at 55 F and ~ 1.2 volumes of carbonation. I've got my Beer Gas cylinder down in the car waiting to go home. (not in the sun).

My question is what pressure do I push the beer at?

Oh normal Danby 4.2 cu. ft. conversion with dual tower on top. Never measured but I'd guess 3 feet of tubing.

Thanks

Rudeboy
 

tasq

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You need to serve beer gas at like 25 - 30psi. You're going to need a much longer line. At least 20 feet. I'd go 30 to be safe.
 

phuff7129

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Rudeboy said:
What? Nobody told me that. Ah crap. I don't have that mcuh beer line nor could I fit it in my kegerator.

Rudeboy
He's pulling your leg. Not sure why he would do that but he is. I serve at 8-10 psi. I use about 4-6 feet of serving line per tap. It helps cut down on foaming.
 

JuanMoore

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What percentage CO2 is your beergas blend? Either way, the serving pressure will likely need to be in the 35-40 psi range at that temp to maintain carbonation. Most people find that nitro faucets work best around 30 psi though, so you might consider dropping the temp a little and serving at 30-35 psi.

You need to serve beer gas at like 25 - 30psi. You're going to need a much longer line. At least 20 feet. I'd go 30 to be safe.
Unlike when running straight CO2, the restrictor plate in the nitro faucet is what provides the majority of the resistance, not the lines, so line length isn't as important. If you run 30' lines though, there might not be sufficient pressure at the restrictor plate to get the nice cascading head effect.

He's pulling your leg. Not sure why he would do that but he is. I serve at 8-10 psi. I use about 4-6 feet of serving line per tap. It helps cut down on foaming.
The OP is asking about running beer gas (CO2/nitrogen blend) and a nitro faucet, and I think you're referring to running straight CO2 and a standard faucet.
 

phuff7129

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JuanMoore said:
What percentage CO2 is your beergas blend? Either way, the serving pressure will likely need to be in the 35-40 psi range at that temp to maintain carbonation. Most people find that nitro faucets work best around 30 psi though, so you might consider dropping the temp a little and serving at 30-35 psi.

Unlike when running straight CO2, the restrictor plate in the nitro faucet is what provides the majority of the resistance, not the lines, so line length isn't as important. If you run 30' lines though, there might not be sufficient pressure at the restrictor plate to get the nice cascading head effect.

The OP is asking about running beer gas (CO2/nitrogen blend) and a nitro faucet, and I think you're referring to running straight CO2 and a standard faucet.
You are correct. Sorry about that.
 

FredTheNuke

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JuanMoore - question on this topic. I have a pair of Perlick 664B manual gas blenders. The instructions say to set the CO2 and the Nitrogen primary regulators at 40psi and then adjust to set the gas ratio. This blended supply is then fed to a secondary regulator.

If a stout faucet is best at 30psi do you see any issues with the secondary regulator functioning with only a 10psi drop across it?

My keezer where the stout keg is stored is set to 36F. How does this temperature relate to pushing a Guinness clone type stout if you set the CO2 to 1.5 vols at room temperature and then push the keg via the above beer gas settings?
 

FredTheNuke

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Also - found another of your posts discussing McDantim's Gas Blend calculator (a spreadsheet file that I downloaded).

If I understand it correctly, a beer at 36F, pushed with 30 psi of beer gas, with 1.2 vols of CO2 dissolved at sea level and 6% ABV would require a 27% CO2 / 73% nitrogen beer gas to maintain carbonation at 1.2 vols while being served???
 

JuanMoore

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JuanMoore - question on this topic. I have a pair of Perlick 664B manual gas blenders. The instructions say to set the CO2 and the Nitrogen primary regulators at 40psi and then adjust to set the gas ratio. This blended supply is then fed to a secondary regulator.

If a stout faucet is best at 30psi do you see any issues with the secondary regulator functioning with only a 10psi drop across it?

My keezer where the stout keg is stored is set to 36F. How does this temperature relate to pushing a Guinness clone type stout if you set the CO2 to 1.5 vols at room temperature and then push the keg via the above beer gas settings?
There shouldn't be any issue with the regulators as described. It's very important for the CO2 and N2 primary regulators to have the same pressure setting, and it should be higher than the secondary pressure, but that's really all you need to worry about.

Not really sure what you're asking about the temperature. If you're looking for the CO2/N2 blend required at a specific temp and desired carb level, use the McDantim Easy-blend calculator. I'm guessing you'll need ~34% CO2/66% N2 for what you're describing.

http://mcdantim.mobi/easyblend.html

Edit: I was too slow, but yes, ~27% CO2 for 1.2 vol or 34% for 1.5 vol.
 

FredTheNuke

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Wow - never saw the calculator as a webpage - very cool.

Thanks again for all your assistance. Now to get my N2 rig mounted on the wall behind my keezer!

I can already taste the Guinness Clone!
 
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