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What mash temp for US 2-row pale ale malt?

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This damn recipe says 144-152 degrees for the mash, but I heard people on here say that the temperature is VERY IMPORTANT so I would rather have a target temperature than a range.

What is a good temperature to use?

Thank you
 

Stauffbier

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There aren't special temp requirements for different types of grains. Mash temp is determined by the style of beer basically. If you want a dry, light bodied beer, you mash on the low end. If you want a heavier body, more residual sweetness, then you mash on the higher end.
 

BlueHouseBrewhaus

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148-150 will give you a more highly fermentable wort (lower FG) and a lighter bodied beer. 150-152 will give a medium body and 154-156 will give a more full body.
 
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Alright, thanks everyone. This is a lager so I'll stay in the low end.
 

VladOfTrub

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Sometimes, the mash schedule for lager is stepped at different temperatures. The temperatures given in the recipe are before mash gelatinization (144F) and after mash gelatinization (152F). Enzymatic action changes after gelatinization. The writer mentioned a temperature range that works for lager. The recipe might not explain things too well.

It's not a bad idea to learn a little bit about how and why enzymes work and what role they play in making beer.

Brewing lager using the English method and ale malt; interesting recipe. Instead of using the single temp conversion method, why not try step mashing? Mash at 144F for 20 minutes. Then, crank the mash temp up to 149F for 20-30 minutes. Then, a step at 155F for 5 minutes and 158F for 10 minutes. Then, 172F for 10 minutes. Run off the extract. Use boiling water infusions to raise mash temp. The schedule allows the mash to rest longer in the beta range, than in the non-fermentable sugar producing, alpha temp range. Toss in some German Hallertau. Use 34/70 or 830 yeast.

The English method doesn't allow a brewer to have much control over enzymatic action. It's a take what you get method, based on a single temperature conversion. The process might not produce the beer that is expected. Controlling enzymatic action plays a part when it comes to what the final product becomes.
 
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Sometimes, the mash schedule for lager is stepped at different temperatures. The temperatures given in the recipe are before mash gelatinization (144F) and after mash gelatinization (152F). Enzymatic action changes after gelatinization. The writer mentioned a temperature range that works for lager. The recipe might not explain things too well.

It's not a bad idea to learn a little bit about how and why enzymes work and what role they play in making beer.

Brewing lager using the English method and ale malt; interesting recipe. Instead of using the single temp conversion method, why not try step mashing? Mash at 144F for 20 minutes. Then, crank the mash temp up to 149F for 20-30 minutes. Then, a step at 155F for 5 minutes and 158F for 10 minutes. Then, 172F for 10 minutes. Run off the extract. Use boiling water infusions to raise mash temp. The schedule allows the mash to rest longer in the beta range, than in the non-fermentable sugar producing, alpha temp range. Toss in some German Hallertau. Use 34/70 or 830 yeast.

The English method doesn't allow a brewer to have much control over enzymatic action. It's a take what you get method, based on a single temperature conversion. The process might not produce the beer that is expected. Controlling enzymatic action plays a part when it comes to what the final product becomes.
Thanks for the info, I will read some more about this. This is my first time doing a proper mash, so I have years to experiment! I think I will do a step mash as you said, but maybe just two or three steps. I will learn something!
 
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