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What is the best mesh number for bag in BIAB method?

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Miles_1111

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I am brewing with BIAB method for the first time. There are many bags with different mesh number to choose, such as from 60, 80, 100,120 to 200. Which one works best for BIAB? Cheers
 

McKnuckle

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Keep in mind that mesh size and microns run in opposite directions - with microns, the lower the number, the smaller the opening. Mesh size is the opposite; the higher the number, the smaller the opening.

Here is a convenient comparison chart.

Of the mesh sizes you list, I'd go with 60, which is about 250 microns. Any smaller and you're going to have very slow draining.
 

wsmith1625

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I wouldn't pick a bag based solely off the mesh size. How is it going to fit your kettle? A Wilser bag is made custom to your kettle size and the draw string holds it in place nicely.

 
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Jtvann

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I can’t imagine that there is a cheaper product out there than a Wilser bag that is worth the difference in savings.

I’d get it if Wilser was really expensive. It’s not. Wilser has a superior product, at the right price, and the customer service to back it up.

I’d challenge anybody on these forums to mention a better product.
 

wsmith1625

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I can’t imagine that there is a cheaper product out there than a Wilser bag that is worth the difference in savings.

I’d get it if Wilser was really expensive. It’s not. Wilser has a superior product, at the right price, and the customer service to back it up.

I’d challenge anybody on these forums to mention a better product.
You might think that @wilserbrewer pays us to promote his bags, and he probably should, but we're actually just satisfied customers.
 

Waunabeer

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I can’t imagine that there is a cheaper product out there than a Wilser bag that is worth the difference in savings.

I’d get it if Wilser was really expensive. It’s not. Wilser has a superior product, at the right price, and the customer service to back it up.

I’d challenge anybody on these forums to mention a better product.
I'm sure they are fine bags, but that being said, I absolutely love my Brew Bag. It's very sturdy with the 4 nylon straps that support and hold it. I'm not saying it's better, but its been awesome for the 12 brews I've done in it. Absolutely no signs of wear or scorching from my electric element. :mug:
 

LittleRiver

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... love my Brew Bag. It's very sturdy with the 4 nylon straps...
I'm sure it's a great bag. If it makes you happy that's pretty much all that matters.

I don't like that bag because of the straps.

If you look at the worst case weight of a fully loaded bag vs the surface area that supports that weight, you'll see that the force per square inch on the fabric is quite low. Straps are superfluous, they're simply not needed to make the bag "sturdy".

As far as convenience in attaching the bag to an overhead hoist, straps are not necessarily the best way. A prusik hitch around the bag (with a simple loop of cord) can be adjusted so it is right above the grain. This reduces the amount of overhead clearance you need to your hoist point.

Another convenience with Wilser's bag is the drawstring. There's no need to use clips to hold the bag to the kettle, the drawstring does it. It's also handy for disposing of wet grains. The bag can be put into a bucket, with the drawstring tightened around the rim. Dump the bucket and the bag inverts, emptying its contents while staying attached to the bucket.
 

PrairieDawg

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Best idea is to get either a Wilser or a Brew Bag. I have two Wilsers and one Brew Bag. In my opion they are an equally good product, both worth what you pay for them. I am guesing that they are both around 200 microns.
 

theothermillion

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I love the straps on the Bew Bag, It allows me to do a limited sparge. My last batch I took 2 of the straps of the hoist and sparged with 3 quarts. Seemed to work really well!
 

Brooothru

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When I was doing BIAB, my wife made me bags made from Swiss voile which is the material used in Wilder bags I believe. They worked very well and drained nicely. She stitched the top of the bags with 1" nylon webbing with (4) 1" webbing straps spaced around the periphery for lifting/hoisting.

Swiss voile is pretty neat stuff. It's very sheer but has remarkable tensile strength, and it is temperature stable to 400F. I still use it as a filter media instead of wire screens in a Braumeister. IIRC, the mesh is equivalent to a 400 micron screen, though it seems like I get excellent flow through the malt column in a recirculation mash.

Brooo Brother
 

eric19312

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I've had two stuck sparges in a row with my Wilser bag. Am I doing something wrong cleaning it? I keep hearing those brew bag adds on brulosophy mentioning the 400 micron bag for recirculation systems. Would that be better for me? I'm doing a recirculation in my 15 gallon mash tun with a Norcal false bottom.

I've used the bag in there maybe 30 times and only one stuck sparge before these last two batches. One had a lot of wheat but today was all barley except about 10% flaked corn. I'm wondering if I am not doing enough to clean the bag I just rinse it in hot water. Any suggestions would be appreciated I do love convenience of being able to hoist the wet grains out of the mash tun for disposal and cleaning the tun.
 

odie

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I don't think it matters a whole lot in the grand scheme of things. The tighter the mesh perhaps the clearer your initial wort is. Although once you go flame out it's gonna settle some. in the fermenter it's gonna settle anyway, even more once you cold crash.

The concept of BIAB is full volume mash, so a sparge or recirc is not a primary concern. If that's your desire then there are many variables that you must figure out for your own system. Everyone's system is a little different so what works for one does not translate 100% to the next guy.

I do recirc during mash but that is just my choice. Obviously a tighter weave will slow things down. My Wilser is pretty tight and I have to put a mechanical timer on my pump (30 on, 30 off) or my super tiny pump will outrun the bag's flow.

When you pull the bag it's gonna drain regardless of mesh size. one is just gonna drain a bit faster.

What is in your mash will affect draining too. Canned pumpkin was a hassle. It drained but took forever.

All that truly matters is that it fits your kettle and is decently tight (not cheese cloth loose).
 
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Miles_1111

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I don't think it matters a whole lot in the grand scheme of things. The tighter the mesh perhaps the clearer your initial wort is. Although once you go flame out it's gonna settle some. in the fermenter it's gonna settle anyway, even more once you cold crash.
Totally agree. After draining I got pretty haze wort, but after boiling ( whirl floc ), fermentation, cold crash and bottling, the beer turned out quite clear.
 
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