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HBDrinker008

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5 # 2 row
1 # Light Munich
1 # carapils
.5# crystal 40
3 # light DME

1 oz Pride of Ringwood 60 min
.5 oz Pride of Ringwood 30 min
1 oz Ahtanum 2 min

1 oz EKG dryhopped

Wyeast 1056

OG: 1.051 FG 1.011

This beer turned out really well. I made it during a stretch when I was experimenting and just trying things out to see how it worked out. Whatever it is it is my best beer yet even though the effieciency sucked again. I was thinking about entering it in a comp. Not expecting to win just would like some feedback, but it wont do me any good if the only feed back I get is that it is not entered in the right style. If it even has a style.

Any thoughts?
 

TheCrane

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+1 for PA

Type: Ale
Category Number: 10A
Original Gravity: 1.045-1.060 SG
Color: 5.0-14.0 SRM
Final Gravity: 1.010-1.015 SG Bitterness: 30.0-50.0 IBU
Carbonation: 2.3-2.8 vols Alcohol by Volume: 4.50-6.00 %
Description: Lighter in color than English Pale Ale, and distinguished by the use of American hops, which have higher bitterness and aroma than English counterparts.
Profile: Medium body, less caramel than English Pale. Medium to high hop rate with corresponding aroma. Pale golden to deep amber in color. May have some fruity esters. No diacetyl. Moderate to high carbonation.
Ingredients: American 2-row Pale Malt. Crystal malt. American hops. Dry hopping for aroma. American ale yeast. Low carbonate water. Small portion of specialty grains.
Examples: Sierra Nevada Pale Ale, Stone Pale Ale, Red Hook Ale, Harpoon Ale, Full Sail Pale Ale, Pyramid Pale Ale, Deschutes Mirror Pond

Or perhaps

Bitter & English Pale Ale


Type: Ale
Category Number: 4C
Original Gravity: 1.046-1.065 SG
Color: 6.0-14.0 SRM
Final Gravity: 1.011-1.020 SG Bitterness: 30.0-65.0 IBU
Carbonation: 1.5-2.4 vols Alcohol by Volume: 4.40-6.20 %
Description: Famous style from Burton-on-Trent. Stronger body than ordinary bitter, but slightly less bitter. A balanced, easy drinking beer that is malty and strong but not overbearing.
Profile: Medium to full body, with medium to high bitterness and hop aroma. Dry with a defined hop flavor. Golden to copper color. Crystal malt evident. Low carbonation for kegs, medium for bottled version.
Ingredients: English malt. Crystal malt. English hops. Water with high Calcium Sulfate (gypsum) profile enhances bitterness perception (i.e. famous Burton-on-Trent Water)
Examples: Bass Pale Ale, Whitbread Pale Ale, Royal Oak, Fullers ESB
 

Brewsmith

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I thought about it too, but he used the CA ale yeast. Switch the yeast and he's in ESB territory.
 
OP
H

HBDrinker008

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Yea I new it was pale ale but wasn't sure if it was american or closer to something english. The hops are by no means american so that kind of threw me off, but the yeast is american so that was a point for that direction.

I dont usually get to caught up on labels its good which matters most to me. Its my first beer that I think was good enough to be passed off as something commercial so it got me thinking was to what it would be.

Not entirely sure brewsmith but i think the 1056 is american ale not california I dont know if there is a difference
 

TexLaw

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Ahtanum hops are quite American, and with the 2 minute addition, I expect some obvious aroma from them. American hops are acceptable under the English Pale Ale guidelines, though, so I would look there. You are right on the line between O/S/B Bitters and ESB, so you might need to make a judgment call, or consider enter both subcategories.

The yeast is not ideal for either style, but fermentation character is not at their hearts. Any clean yeast will do, and whatever esters you get from 1056 under proper fermentation conditions should be acceptable.

It's hard to make much of a call, though, without a sample. :)


TL
 
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