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What is going on with my IPAs?

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MrEggSandwich

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So earlier this year I made a "3/16 IPA" that was a disaster. First dumper in a long time.....It came out muddy (see IPA1 & 2 photos)...Unreal, it was undrinkable. I recently kegged an American IPA, its been in the keg for a couple weeks now, and I'm not crazy about it at all. (IPA 3/4 photos). I made a Kolsch in between that came out great. My IPAs are muddled and muddy....Mash ph was 3.4 for this last IPA, 90 min mash low (147-150), It has zero pop....Chinook/Citra/Amarillo....Was stoked about it, but it's has zero hop "pop" and it looks like ****.

What could be going on? I've never had an infection, doing water chem, longer mashes, low temp....My IPAs never seem dry enough and never seem to have any hop flavor...muddled mess. Frustrated.

Help.


HOME BREW RECIPE:
Title: Covid American IPA 2020

Brew Method: All Grain
Style Name: American IPA
Boil Time: 60 min
Batch Size: 10 gallons (fermentor volume)
Boil Size: 12.5 gallons
Boil Gravity: 1.060
Efficiency: 65% (brew house)

Hop Utilization Multiplier: 1

STATS:
Original Gravity: 1.066
Final Gravity: 1.015
ABV (standard): 6.64%
IBU (tinseth): 81.53
SRM (morey): 6.4
Mash pH: 5.36

FERMENTABLES:
25 lb - Pale 2-Row (90.9%)
1 lb - Munich (3.6%)
12 oz - Caramel / Crystal 40L (2.7%)
12 oz - Acidulated Malt (2.7%)

HOPS:
2 oz - Chinook (13 AA), Type: Pellet, AA: 13.4, Use: Boil for 60 min, IBU: 46.66
2 oz - Amarillo (8.6 AA), Type: Pellet, AA: 8.6, Use: Boil for 10 min, IBU: 10.86
2 oz - Citra (11 AA), Type: Pellet, AA: 12.7, Use: Boil for 10 min, IBU: 16.03
1 oz - Amarillo (8.6 AA), Type: Pellet, AA: 8.6, Use: Whirlpool for 0 min at °F, IBU: 3.22
1 oz - Citra (11 AA), Type: Pellet, AA: 12.7, Use: Whirlpool for 0 min at °F, IBU: 4.76
2 oz - Amarillo (8.6 AA), Type: Pellet, AA: 8.6, Use: Dry Hop for 5 days
2 oz - Citra (11 AA), Type: Pellet, AA: 12.7, Use: Dry Hop for 5 days

MASH GUIDELINES:
1) Infusion, Temp: 150 F, Time: 90 min, Amount: 16.2 gal
Starting Mash Thickness: 1.5 qt/lb

OTHER INGREDIENTS:
7 g - Calcium Chloride (dihydrate), Time: 60 min, Type: Water Agt, Use: Mash
16 g - Gypsum, Time: 60 min, Type: Water Agt, Use: Mash
1 each - Whirlfloc, Time: 10 min, Type: Fining, Use: Boil

YEAST:
Omega Yeast Labs - British Ale I OYL-006
Starter: No
Form: Liquid
Attenuation (avg): 75%
Flocculation: Medium High
Optimum Temp: 64 - 72 F
Fermentation Temp: 67 F
Pitch Rate: 1.0 (M cells / ml / deg P)

PRIMING:
CO2 Level: 2.25 Volumes

TARGET WATER PROFILE:
Profile Name: Light colored and hoppy
Ca2: 75
Mg2: 5
Na: 10
Cl: 50
SO4: 150
HCO3: 0
Water Notes:


Generated by Brewer's Friend - Brewer's Friend - Homebrew Beer Recipes, Calculators, and Forum
Date: 2020-10-30 01:04 UTC
Recipe Last Updated: 2020-09-19 12:15 UTC



HOME BREW RECIPE:
Title: 3/6 IPA

Brew Method: All Grain
Style Name: American IPA
Boil Time: 60 min
Batch Size: 10 gallons (fermentor volume)
Boil Size: 13.05 gallons
Boil Gravity: 1.060
Efficiency: 65% (brew house)

Hop Utilization Multiplier: 1

STATS:
Original Gravity: 1.071
Final Gravity: 1.015
ABV (standard): 7.31%
IBU (tinseth): 86.89
SRM (morey): 8.65
Mash pH: 5.4

FERMENTABLES:
25 lb - Pale 2-Row (85.8%)
1.5 lb - Victory (5.2%)
1 lb - Caramel / Crystal 40L (3.4%)
1 lb - Corn Sugar - Dextrose (3.4%)
10 oz - Acidulated Malt (2.1%)

HOPS:
1 oz - Warrior, Type: Pellet, AA: 17.7, Use: Boil for 60 min, IBU: 30.8
1 oz - Apollo, Type: Pellet, AA: 16.7, Use: Boil for 15 min, IBU: 14.42
2 oz - Citra, Type: Pellet, AA: 13.3, Use: Boil for 5 min, IBU: 9.23
2 oz - Sabro, Type: Pellet, AA: 14.5, Use: Boil for 5 min, IBU: 10.06
4 oz - Sabro, Type: Pellet, AA: 14.5, Use: Whirlpool for 0 min at 200 °F, IBU: 17.38
1 oz - Apollo, Type: Pellet, AA: 16.7, Use: Whirlpool for 0 min at 200 °F, IBU: 5
2 oz - Citra, Type: Pellet, AA: 13.3, Use: Dry Hop for 7 days
2 oz - Sabro, Type: Pellet, AA: 14.5, Use: Dry Hop for 7 days

MASH GUIDELINES:
1) Infusion, Temp: 150 F, Time: 60 min, Amount: 16.28 gal
Starting Mash Thickness: 1.5 qt/lb

OTHER INGREDIENTS:
6 g - Calcium Chloride (dihydrate), Time: 60 min, Type: Water Agt, Use: Mash
18 g - Gypsum, Time: 60 min, Type: Water Agt, Use: Mash
1 each - Whirlfloc, Time: 10 min, Type: Fining, Use: Mash

YEAST:
Omega Yeast Labs - British Ale I OYL-006
Starter: No
Form: Liquid
Attenuation (avg): 75%
Flocculation: Medium High
Optimum Temp: 64 - 72 F
Fermentation Temp: 66 F
Pitch Rate: 1.0 (M cells / ml / deg P)

PRIMING:
Method: co2
CO2 Level: 2.25 Volumes

TARGET WATER PROFILE:
Profile Name: Light colored and hoppy
Ca2: 75
Mg2: 5
Na: 10
Cl: 50
SO4: 150
HCO3: 0
Water Notes:


Generated by Brewer's Friend - Brewer's Friend - Homebrew Beer Recipes, Calculators, and Forum
Date: 2020-10-30 01:03 UTC
Recipe Last Updated: 2020-03-06 14:21 UTC
 

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day_trippr

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What have you read about "oxidation" of high-hopped beer?
Forgive this impression, but those all look epically, horribly oxidized, which would explain pretty much everything.

There are processes that help avoid such outcomes, including avoiding unnecessary rackings (eg: the use of a "secondary" fermentation vessel), avoiding cold-crashes unless there are provisions for O2 ingress, closed transfers, and purging kegs and bottles with CO2.

It's a serious thing with IPAs and especially NEIPAs. Takes some work but totally worth it...

Cheers!
 

Dgallo

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Yeah those beers are oxidized to hell and back. You need to review oxidation and ways to prevent and tighten up your practices. Extremely important for heavily hopped beers but having good anti oxygen practice will make every beer you make that much better.
 
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MrEggSandwich

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Thanks. Hadn’t thought about that. I don’t do secondary and have done closed transfers before...what point in process am I going wrong? Could simply not doing a CPT turn things so horribly? Wouldn’t my other beers be oxidized? Seems like the samples are fine. But once in keg, things don’t get better.
 

BeerFst

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Closed transfers are relatively new for hombrewers, fueled by the popularity of hazy ipa. I would think many, myself included, that had made some successful ipas using buckets and an autosiphon right they the mouth of a corny. Closed transfer definitely better but not the root cause here, even if o2 is the culprit.

Maybe go thru your whole process to see if anything sticks out.

I agree with you, it doesn’t make sense tour other beers aren’t oxidized, though one possibility is you’ve become accustomed to it. Unless you’re only drinking your homebrew and zero commercial, I doubt thats the case

lots of hop can make a beer susceptible to oxidation more so that lightly hopped but your beers aren’t crazy high by any stretch
 

day_trippr

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Pretty much every step of the way post-fermentation (and by that I mean once FG is reached - not months later) has to account for the potential for oxygen exposure. Ingress into the fermenter all the way to packaging oxygen. And while it's clearly an acute issue for ipas and their kin, it affects all beers, even light American lagers (the producers of which go to insane levels of O2 avoidance from end to end, compared to the typical home brewer).

There are tons of related discussions on HBT, and for the most part, not a lot of debate about the need to avoid oxygen once fermentation is complete...

Cheers!
 
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MrEggSandwich

MrEggSandwich

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Pretty much every step of the way post-fermentation (and by that I mean once FG is reached - not months later) has to account for the potential for oxygen exposure. Ingress into the fermenter all the way to packaging oxygen. And while it's clearly an acute issue for ipas and their kin, it affects all beers, even light American lagers (the producers of which go to insane levels of O2 avoidance from end to end, compared to the typical home brewer).

There are tons of related discussions on HBT, and for the most part, not a lot of debate about the need to avoid oxygen once fermentation is complete...

Cheers!
That’s the thing. CPTs are newer, and surely not everyone is doing them and making good IPA. Maybe all my beers are oxidized? (Now you’ve triggered the OCD..lol)

here’s a Kolsch I made for summer. Doesn’t look oxidized to me.
 

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BeerFst

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The first clue to oxidation will always be flavor and aroma, any dullness is gonna be your o2. I agree it doesn’t look oxidized like the ipas but it doesn’t mean it’s not.

just table that thought for a moment

what’s yours process from boil kettle to fermenter to keg?

also you said 3.4 pH early in the text but your copy paste from brewersfriend is 5.4 Ish. I assume the 3.4 was a typo right?
 

Rob2010SS

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Go through your process and see where oxygen could be introduced like these guys have said. What does your process look like?

2 of the points in your process that are the most obvious are your dry hop and whether or not you're cold crashing.

When are you adding dry hops? When fermentation is still going or when is complete?

What are you fermenting in?

What's your process of adding the dry hops?

Are you cold crashing?

How are you mitigating O2 ingress into the fermenter during the cold crash?

Let's see what your answers look like here and we'll just start working through your process.
 
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MrEggSandwich

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The first clue to oxidation will always be flavor and aroma, any dullness is gonna be your o2. I agree it doesn’t look oxidized like the ipas but it doesn’t mean it’s not.

just table that thought for a moment

what’s yours process from boil kettle to fermenter to keg?

also you said 3.4 pH early in the text but your copy paste from brewersfriend is 5.4 Ish. I assume the 3.4 was a typo right?
5.34ph. My bad.

pump through plate chiller into BrewBucket, aerate.

chest Freezer, temp control, blow off

ferment two weeks. Open lid, sample, add hops in bags. Dry hop 5-7 days.

drop temp for a day or so (don’t do siper cold crash.

Could be suck back. I pull BrewBucket out (with blow off now flapping around)

purge keg with co2 push sanitizer though.

typically then put Brewbucket up on table and drain via tube into keg (lid now off)

close up keg, attach co2, purge.
 

Jtvann

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Those beers look so oxidized that Id question if you hooked up an O2 cylinder by mistake instead of CO2 when carbonating.

I mean it would seriously take effort to make it that far gone.
 
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MrEggSandwich

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Those beers look so oxidized that Id question if you hooked up an O2 cylinder by mistake instead of CO2 when carbonating.

I mean it would seriously take effort to make it that far gone.
Yup. The 3/6 IPA was a disaster. Frustrating, so I did a simple Kolsch (which now I’m questioning if it’s oxidized), which seems good to me.

The American IPA was pretty straight forward. I’m disappointed. Pull pull off the keg, and same as last time, hope it would clear, but I doubt it. Will post another pic tomorrow.
 

Jtvann

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5.34ph. My bad.

pump through plate chiller into BrewBucket, aerate.

chest Freezer, temp control, blow off

ferment two weeks. Open lid, sample, add hops in bags. Dry hop 5-7 days.

drop temp for a day or so (don’t do siper cold crash.

Could be suck back. I pull BrewBucket out (with blow off now flapping around)

purge keg with co2 push sanitizer though.

typically then put Brewbucket up on table and drain via tube into keg (lid now off)

close up keg, attach co2, purge.

Couple of glaring comments. The biggest one for me is CO2 purging the keg, then opening the lid to drain beer in. Opening the lid negates any work at all you’ve done to purge.

Check the process for how to CO2 purge your keg here. Once it’s purged, don’t open the lid. You can probably improve your kegging process a lot with a few simple steps.

Try to figure out a way to attach your filling line to the keg beer out post. You can pop the pressure release valve to let pressure escape as beer is filling. That’s not exactly pressure filling, but it’s better than pour in through an open keg lid.

Try to manage suck back. Cold beer absorbs O2 more than warm beer. Any time you decrease temp at all, head space will contract and you’ll get suck back. Look up the balloon method at the simplest. There’s other methods to use as well without playing with pressure.

Those are the big 2 I see. There’s others, but those are the worst in worst order in my mind.
 

day_trippr

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I was confused about the keg purging - can't tell if there's a Star San purge going on or not - but if it's straight CO2 that's definitely a red flag.
And the suck back thing - it's a killer.
Finally, I've been brewing IPAs for a long time and it doesn't take two weeks in primary to get to the first round of dry hops. More like 5 days.
Time is not a friend of IPAs. Keep the process as short as the numbers support...

Cheers!
 
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MrEggSandwich

MrEggSandwich

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I was confused about the keg purging - can't tell if there's a Star San purge going on or not - but if it's straight CO2 that's definitely a red flag.
And the suck back thing - it's a killer.
Finally, I've been brewing IPAs for a long time and it doesn't take two weeks in primary to get to the first round of dry hops. More like 5 days.
Time is not a friend of IPAs. Keep the process as short as the numbers support...

Cheers!
Thanks. Yes- dump some Star San into keg, push it with Co2 till keg is empty
 

bracconiere

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that's the way my beer pours look when i use bakers yeast and it doesn't flocculate. sure doesn't look oxidized to me?

all my beer is oxidized and it's crystal clear?

edit: i see you added whirfloc, i tried it once, and had like a foot of trub at the bottom of my fermenter, haven't used it again since....
 
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day_trippr

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Thanks. Yes- dump some Star San into keg, push it with Co2 till keg is empty
"some"?

It only takes a little bit of air trapped inside a keg to cause havoc. For instance, if you leave a keg standing upright and fill it with Star San until the liquid comes out the PRV, there's still plenty of air trapped under the lid to damage a beer. If you doubt that, take a keg lid and look how far down the PRV housing protrudes. The opening to that housing is at its tip. I wager there's a couple of ounces of volume that would be trapped under a keg kid.

Two ways to deal with that: one, cut the gas dip tube down to 1/2" total length (it only needs to be long enough to hold the little o-ring under the flange). Then when filling the keg with Star San, tilt it so the gas post is at the high point and vent through that instead of the PRV. Alternatively, flip the keg over and fill through the gas port, venting through the beer port. If the beer dip tube is of original length and properly positioned in its well at the keg bottom, some rocking while filling will get every last bit of air out of the keg...

Cheers!
 

Iseneye

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So many threads on this. Maybe someone could make a sticky.
 

bwible

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I know everybody went straight to O2, but doesn’t that look like yeast still in suspension? I am not familiar with Omega yeast. Have you used that yeast before? Same yeast for both IPAs? I’m guessing its not the same strain you used for your kolsch? Some British yeasts are “powdery” and are notorious for remaining in suspension. Low flocculator? Did you make a starter? Bad yeast? Or is it possible the starter got contaminated? Did you try any kind of fining, like gelatin or Isinglass like the British cask brewers do? Or cold crash to drop yeast? Trying to cover the obvious.

Large late hop additions also cause haze. The one recipe says 5 oz at knockout, but the other one only says 2 oz. With that much late hop whirlpool and dry hop you are not going to have a crystal clear beer, but I agree it shouldn’t look like that. I might try again with a known cleaner American yeast since you’re loaded up on American hops.
 
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Moose_MI

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Well, here goes nothin....

I too have been having issues with my IPAs this year..similar process and recipes and numbers to what OP describes
I dont accept that oxidation has suddenly found it’s way into my beer. Oxygen has been around a long time and I’ve made many good IPAs in the past.
Your pics look like they have a LOT of yeast in suspension. I dont live or die on perfectly clear beer but when Ive had some beers that dont clean up better than what your pics show they are never crisp and the hops are always muted. By the time I get to the 3rd keg the beer has improved to the point I wished I’d not drank the first 2 early. In fact I’m drinking one of those now.
I’m seriously startIng to wonder about the quality of hops. I’m also rethinking my preference to bag/basket hops in boil and dry hop. I‘ve also got caught up in all the dogma about not doing mid-boil hop additions...for good ‘ol American IPAs Im starting to think you need these after all.
So I’m planning to go back to the basics and bump up the IBUs 20% and see what that gets me
 

bwible

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Well, here goes nothin....

I too have been having issues with my IPAs this year..similar process and recipes and numbers to what OP describes
I dont accept that oxidation has suddenly found it’s way into my beer. Oxygen has been around a long time and I’ve made many good IPAs in the past.
Your pics look like they have a LOT of yeast in suspension. I dont live or die on perfectly clear beer but when Ive had some beers that dont clean up better than what your pics show they are never crisp and the hops are always muted. By the time I get to the 3rd keg the beer has improved to the point I wished I’d not drank the first 2 early. In fact I’m drinking one of those now.
I’m seriously startIng to wonder about the quality of hops. I’m also rethinking my preference to bag/basket hops in boil and dry hop. I‘ve also got caught up in all the dogma about not doing mid-boil hop additions...for good ‘ol American IPAs Im starting to think you need these after all.
So I’m planning to go back to the basics and bump up the IBUs 20% and see what that gets me
I also just commented on yeast. I’m also revisting the hop basket, hop spider thing. Made several beers with it, all seem lacking. I just made an American Brown Ale, no basket or spider, commando hops at 60, 30, 15, 5 old school. Fermenting now, already smells like its going to be one of the best beers I made this year
 

brew703

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I hope the OP doesn't take this the wrong way but that has to be the worst looking beer I have seen. Oxidation sucks!

How are your hops stored? Freezer? Vac Sealed?

I use an All Rounder and ferment under pressure. For NEIPA's I usually dry hop 24-30 hrs after fermentation has started. That's the only time I open the fermenter. I purge my kegs and do a star san flush. When I brew Pales or IPA's I usually dry hop at the 48 hr mark of fermentation and then purge the fermenter. I do not always dry hop.

As for the boil, I usually add in hops, mostly at FWH or at the 30 min mark then again towards flameout and then a whirlpool. All my hops go in a bag.

Dry hoping I just throw into the fermenter. When I use my SS Brewtech bucket fermenter, dry hops are added in a bag.

I hope you figure it out. Good Luck.
 

Beenym88

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I also disagree with the oxidation it very well could be but in my earlier days when I really didn’t know what I was doing I never had a beer get oxidized like that. When allowing a lot of splashing g during siphoning. I recently posted a beer that everyone thought was infected but it really just had a lot of fat in it from adjuncts and it hadn’t cold crashed and settled long enough. It actually came out amazing when at a glance most people thought it was infected. So maybe your muddy beer is a lot of trub that hasn’t settled that’s a simple answer but I really don’t think it’s oxidation. Good luck.
 

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I agree the muddy look can’t be just oxidation, but the grains don’t suggest a beer that dark. Also on the hops these are 10 gallon recipes, so halve those numbers in your head. The hopping rates and certainly the dry hopping rates aren’t that high at all.
While I do think the major culprit here is oxidation I still don’t think we’ve gotten to where in the process it is.

could there be a hole in one of your transfer hoses bubbling air into the beer as you transfer?

mare you rinsing after cleaning with pbw or oxiclean? Are you getting all the starsan out?

I know the LODO folks say starsan can oxidize a beer (so they use no foam saniclean).

there Re definitely improvements to be made in his process but I think this is exceptionally bad. I can’t believe an open transfer or an ounce of o2 in the headspace is all we got here
 

Spivey24

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You don’t mention much about the taste. Are there any off flavors, bitey bitterness, or any other clue? Are you starting with RO water? That CaCl addition looks about double what I add to get those numbers from RO. Maybe it just needs time. Some take longer. How much of the hop trub from the kettle got on the fermenter? I have had issues with getting too much and bad clarity. Did you dry hop loose or in a hop bag?
 

josephort

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I've had this happen to two beers in the past year- one NEIPA and one dry-hopped Belgian Tripple. In my case, the color and flavor change only happened after the beer was a couple months old and I had already drank most of it, so while it was still annoying it wasn't a huge deal. I'm pretty sure this is oxidation and not suspended yeast or other particles- I ferment in clear carboys, and during active fermentation when there's a ton of suspended stuff a NEIPA still shouldn't be anywhere near that dark.

I also feel that oxygen isn't generally a problem for my beer, but my assumption is that heavily dry-hopped beers are particularly susceptible to it, in part because adding hops post-fermentation probably introduces some oxygen, and in part because I believe volatile hop compounds are much more susceptible to oxidation. My fairly subjective experience is that my oxidized hoppy beers don't have the "wet cardboard" flavor that people that people warn about, but instead just have a degradation of the hop flavors. So I think it's totally possible that brewing super hoppy beers requires a greater attention to this stuff than other styles.
 

day_trippr

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"wet cardboard" and "sherry" characters are the terminal results of oxidation.
Waaay before that is attenuation of aroma followed by attenuation of flavor...

Cheers!
 

Dog House Brew

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By looking at the OP’s process, I’d say oxidation. That said, I think anytime the lid of a bucket is removed, samples taken, and dry hopped, way too much oxygen is introduced. Cold crashing in a bucket is also difficult. The lid really needs a gasket for it to seal. Anyway, I think the OP has enough info to improve their IPA. These IPA beers take very little O2. These precesses have improved all of my beer. I couldn’t figure out how to beat O2 with my plastic fermenters. Bringing my glass back out, or getting clear beer and fermenting in kegs.
 

BeerFst

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AAARghhh!!

Forget about suckback, you've introduced enough oxygen in the fermenter at that point to ruin any beer.
Before i ever knew about fermenting in kegs, or closed transfers or anything like that, this was my exact SOP and i can certainly attest i did not have IPAs coming out like brown ales like above
 

moreb33rplz

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I'm in the 'that isn't oxidation' camp. I've brewed many beers basically not paying attention to oxygen at all and never had anything remotely close to that.

THat said I have no idea what could cause a beer to look like that
 

eric19312

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Wow that’s scary.

I agree the beer looks oxidized but doesn't seem like oxidation alone would make this beer look like this. This looks like a badly oxidized NEIPA but neither the recipe nor the process is NEIPA.

All barley malt grist - no adjuncts like oats or wheat
Only 4oz dry hops in a 10 gallon batch
British ale yeast supposed to "drop fast and clear"
Dry hops not added until 2 weeks after yeast was pitched

This is a west coast IPA recipe and I made lots of those before I got the oxidation bug. I'm sure I could make them even better now but they didn't look like that or taste like OP reports.

So what is left?
Mislabeled ingredients?
Contamination?
Attack by giant squid?
 

moreb33rplz

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It looks like my wort does in the fermenter during the process of active fermentation - all sludgy and opaque
 
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MrEggSandwich

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I know everybody went straight to O2, but doesn’t that look like yeast still in suspension? I am not familiar with Omega yeast. Have you used that yeast before? Same yeast for both IPAs? I’m guessing its not the same strain you used for your kolsch? Some British yeasts are “powdery” and are notorious for remaining in suspension. Low flocculator? Did you make a starter? Bad yeast? Or is it possible the starter got contaminated? Did you try any kind of fining, like gelatin or Isinglass like the British cask brewers do? Or cold crash to drop yeast? Trying to cover the obvious.

Large late hop additions also cause haze. The one recipe says 5 oz at knockout, but the other one only says 2 oz. With that much late hop whirlpool and dry hop you are not going to have a crystal clear beer, but I agree it shouldn’t look like that. I might try again with a known cleaner American yeast since you’re loaded up on American hops.

Yup...Same yeast for last two IPAs..Omega British Ale 1 (Similiar to White Labs 007)...Med/High Floc.
 
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MrEggSandwich

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I hope the OP doesn't take this the wrong way but that has to be the worst looking beer I have seen. Oxidation sucks!

How are your hops stored? Freezer? Vac Sealed?

I use an All Rounder and ferment under pressure. For NEIPA's I usually dry hop 24-30 hrs after fermentation has started. That's the only time I open the fermenter. I purge my kegs and do a star san flush. When I brew Pales or IPA's I usually dry hop at the 48 hr mark of fermentation and then purge the fermenter. I do not always dry hop.

As for the boil, I usually add in hops, mostly at FWH or at the 30 min mark then again towards flameout and then a whirlpool. All my hops go in a bag.

Dry hoping I just throw into the fermenter. When I use my SS Brewtech bucket fermenter, dry hops are added in a bag.

I hope you figure it out. Good Luck.
No worries! I was horrified as well...That's why this latest IPA is so concerning. Muddled mess. My hops are vacuum sealed in freezer, re-sealed after opening.
 
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MrEggSandwich

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Wow that’s scary.

I agree the beer looks oxidized but doesn't seem like oxidation alone would make this beer look like this. This looks like a badly oxidized NEIPA but neither the recipe nor the process is NEIPA.

All barley malt grist - no adjuncts like oats or wheat
Only 4oz dry hops in a 10 gallon batch
British ale yeast supposed to "drop fast and clear"
Dry hops not added until 2 weeks after yeast was pitched

This is a west coast IPA recipe and I made lots of those before I got the oxidation bug. I'm sure I could make them even better now but they didn't look like that or taste like OP reports.

So what is left?
Mislabeled ingredients?
Contamination?
Attack by giant squid?

Here's a photo just taken of the recent IPA...It's been in keg 2-3 weeks now. As you can see, has that same brownish tint, hop flavor is bitter, muddled. No hint of the citra amarillo....Mess
 

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MrEggSandwich

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Before i ever knew about fermenting in kegs, or closed transfers or anything like that, this was my exact SOP and i can certainly attest i did not have IPAs coming out like brown ales like above
Yeah..You and I are aligned here. Not every homewbrewer is having a 100% oxygen free experience. Not every homebrew does (or can) do CPTs...That's just the latest thing...We all started out brewing in buckets, using siphons. ****, we would transfer into secondary, then into bottling bucket.....Never had anything like this.
 
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