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What hop varieties are you adding this year?

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Jako

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So I am about to go pick up 3 new hop rhizomes today. I plan to have 4 rows of 2 on a trellis I will be building soon. I am adding cashmere, golding and tahoma. I will have a second year cascade.

What are you guys adding this year?
 

B-Hoppy

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seedlings chex 2020.JPG I'm hoping to have at least one new variety out of this project, there's probably another 10-15 trays like this that will all be grown out and put through their paces.
 
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Jako

Jako

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that is super cool! once i get growing hops down i would love to experiment with hops and see what i can create or even improve base on the environment. make some super Utah hops.
 

Ollie8000

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We have some of an unknown variety that have been doing well in the three years since we planted them (we weren't brewing for much of that, but used them a bit this last year).

This year we added some Mount Hood to our annual mail-order gardening order.
 
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Jako

Jako

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We have some of an unknown variety that have been doing well in the three years since we planted them (we weren't brewing for much of that, but used them a bit this last year).

This year we added some Mount Hood to our annual mail-order gardening order.
Sounds good I consider mount hood as one for my trellis. How did the batch turn out with the mystery variety?
 

Ollie8000

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It was early in my return to brewing and everything was very variable at that stage. We used them in an American Pale Ale, and it was OKish but not great. But that's a style we still don't have a good version of.

Come this season, we'll have a lot more established recipes that will let us see what they add and what they work in much better.
 

Sir-Brews-Alot

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Have three year Northern Brewer, Glacier and Spalt Select plants. Planted some Bramling at the same time as the others, but the Bramling did not do good at all, so pulled the crown last year. Purchased a Prussian plant from Great lakes Hops to replace it. Hopefully it'll do better.
 

friarsmith

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I have two 5th-year Columbia hops and one 6th year Cluster. All three plants are two crowns per vertical trellis. They give me plenty of cones for my American lagers.

I just ordered a couple of Chinook rooted cuttings from Great Lakes hops. I plan to start making APA's, session IPA's and American Barleywines more frequently with them.

I'd love to grow 5 or 6 more varieties because I really enjoy the process, but I simply don't need them.
 

Sierra brew club

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So I am not your typical home hop grower.
I've been brewing beer since 1996 when I was 17. My old brother had several hops growing just to shade his garden. We started brewing beer once his hops were established. I continued brewing beer through my enlistment and when i got out of the service in 2008 i moved back to my home town. I started a small hop yard knowing the importance of fresh hops.

Fast forward to today on our 52 acre farm we have a 1/2 acre hop yard with a small research and development hop yard down the hill from our house.

Recently we've also started A small hop yard at 1 of my best friends properties down on the River that we are dedicating to breeding.
Overall we have about a 120 Cultivars of hops.

This year in the Research and Development area we are planting these new varieties.

Wawona
Triumph
Kinsman
Collegiate (A wild Oakhurst hop that grows behind the college next to the creek)
Boadie
Electric Smog
Oregon Cluster

Most of these are wild hops we are experimenting with
 
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Jako

Jako

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It was early in my return to brewing and everything was very variable at that stage. We used them in an American Pale Ale, and it was OKish but not great. But that's a style we still don't have a good version of.

Come this season, we'll have a lot more established recipes that will let us see what they add and what they work in much better.
sounds great. i hope to get some hops from my second year plant and take what i learned and not end up with a spider mite issue.
 
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Jako

Jako

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Have three year Northern Brewer, Glacier and Spalt Select plants. Planted some Bramling at the same time as the others, but the Bramling did not do good at all, so pulled the crown last year. Purchased a Prussian plant from Great lakes Hops to replace it. Hopefully it'll do better.
Bramling Cross is one of my favorite hops. not sure if its a different variety.
 
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Jako

Jako

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So I am not your typical home hop grower.
I've been brewing beer since 1996 when I was 17. My old brother had several hops growing just to shade his garden. We started brewing beer once his hops were established. I continued brewing beer through my enlistment and when i got out of the service in 2008 i moved back to my home town. I started a small hop yard knowing the importance of fresh hops.

Fast forward to today on our 52 acre farm we have a 1/2 acre hop yard with a small research and development hop yard down the hill from our house.

Recently we've also started A small hop yard at 1 of my best friends properties down on the River that we are dedicating to breeding.
Overall we have about a 120 Cultivars of hops.

This year in the Research and Development area we are planting these new varieties.

Wawona
Triumph
Kinsman
Collegiate (A wild Oakhurst hop that grows behind the college next to the creek)
Boadie
Electric Smog
Oregon Cluster

Most of these are wild hops we are experimenting with

dang! that's super super cool!

Utah has some wild hops, once i get a better idea of what i am doing i would love to cut myself a rhizome and see how well it grows. i am higher up in elevation so it might hold up.

I know one of the local breweries makes a batch. the local home brew club helps pick the hops for the batch. so it cant be too bad.


Do you sell rhizomes or at least plan to. It would be interesting to see how the varieties you are working with would hold up in my area. I own an acre so i am looking for ways to fill my back yard. i know a green house is on my to do list.
 

Sir-Brews-Alot

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Bramling Cross is one of my favorite hops. not sure if its a different variety.
Yeah, I'm not sure either. I purchased them from Great Lakes Hops, https://www.greatlakeshops.com/apps/search?q=bramling, who described them as " An early 1900’s English heirloom aroma hop variety; related to Goldings" which made me think it was probably Brambling Cross. I love the hops themselves, the plant didn't do so well though. I see GLH discontinued them. I purchased all four in 2017, the Glacier has done the best, followed closely by the Northern Brew with the Spalter Select a distance third in productivity. The Bramling would grow well initially, then start turning brown for some reason.
 

Northern_Brewer

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" An early 1900’s English heirloom aroma hop variety; related to Goldings"
It would be more correct to view Bramling as one of several clonal selections within the Goldings family, all of which can be sold as Goldings - see

http://edsbeer.blogspot.com/2012/01/farnham-white-bine-hop.html
http://edsbeer.blogspot.com/2012/02/genesis-of-goldings.html
http://edsbeer.blogspot.com/2012/05/goldings-varieties-in-modern-age.html

She's actually one of the older Goldings clones, having been selected some time before 1865. In 1927 Ernest Salmon at Wye College crossed Bramling with OL45, a brother of Bullion and Brewer's Gold from his original crosses in 1919. One of the progeny of Bramling x OL45 became Bramling Cross.

As an aside, one of BX's sons was crossed with Keyworth Early to create one of the significant branches of the Wye hop pedigree that includes Yeoman, Phoenix and Boadicea.

So Bramling is a typical spicy Golding, Bramling Cross is known for its blackcurrant flavour (like her aunts Bullion & Brewer's Gold), but in very hot vintages like 2018 the fruit is lost and you get much more of that Goldings character.

Oh, and there's no second "b" in Bramling, it's the name of a village near Canterbury where the original selection was made. Too often I see it called "Brambling" which is just wrong.
 
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