What happened to my batch?

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum:

privateer35

Member
Joined
Nov 17, 2021
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
Hi all!

First time poster, long time lurker. I've been making ciders this past year and am around 5/6 batches in.

I was trying to start another batch last night with EC-1118 (one packet for a 1 gallon batch) and some really good local, farm-fresh apple cider. However, when I checked on it this morning, it seems to have formed clumps in the neck of the carboy and has me concerned this batch will need to go down the drain...

I haven't really done anything out of the unusual besides this is my first time using EC-1118. Additionally, I added the below ingredients for making a 1 gallon batch:
- 1 gallon apple cider
- 1 teaspoon yeast nutrient
- 1.5 tablespoons of an acid blend
- .5 teaspoon pectic enzyme

I thought I did a really good job of sanitizing as well....

I'll add that this was the first time I wrapped the carboy around a heat pad that was held at 70f degrees... I wonder if that stressed the yeast out? I was concerned considering this lives in the lower part of the house...

Could this have anything to do with the acid blend or EC-1118? I've attached a picture of what horror I saw this morning....

Note: this is about 12 hours after pitching the yeast into primary.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_9188.jpg
    IMG_9188.jpg
    2.7 MB · Views: 36
Last edited:

cubalz

Beer Whore
Joined
Dec 30, 2013
Messages
953
Reaction score
414
Location
Magnolia, DE
I think that is from the addition of the pectic enzyme and the solids rising to the surface (also tiny bit of protein in the apples) from a vigorous fermentation. I would not worry about it and let the fermentation finish. Newer brewers have a habit of wanting to quickly dump anything that looks even remotely odd. When the fermentation is complete take a taste and then, only then. decide on the fate of the brew. My money says it is ok.
 
OP
OP
P

privateer35

Member
Joined
Nov 17, 2021
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
I think that is from the addition of the pectic enzyme and the solids rising to the surface (also tiny bit of protein in the apples) from a vigorous fermentation. I would not worry about it and let the fermentation finish. Newer brewers have a habit of wanting to quickly dump anything that looks even remotely odd. When the fermentation is complete take a taste and then, only then. decide on the fate of the brew. My money says it is ok.
Thanks for the reply. I've added pectic enzyme before with a different yeast and have had not problems before. You say to let this finish fermentation.... however, I see no bubbles and wonder if CO2 can even be released since that particle clump is filling the whole neck?

Note: this is about 12 hours after pitching the yeast into primary.
 

cubalz

Beer Whore
Joined
Dec 30, 2013
Messages
953
Reaction score
414
Location
Magnolia, DE
are you seeing bubbles coming through your blow off container that the tube is going to? If so, you are fine
 
OP
OP
P

privateer35

Member
Joined
Nov 17, 2021
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
are you seeing bubbles coming through your blow off container that the tube is going to? If so, you are fine
Not using a blow-off tube, just the attachment that you fill a little water into. No bubble activity there.
 

cubalz

Beer Whore
Joined
Dec 30, 2013
Messages
953
Reaction score
414
Location
Magnolia, DE
Ahhh, a bubble lock! How long has it been fermenting? It may be done so you would not see bubble activity or maybe even positive pressure.
 
OP
OP
P

privateer35

Member
Joined
Nov 17, 2021
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
Ahhh, a bubble lock! How long has it been fermenting? It may be done so you would not see bubble activity or maybe even positive pressure.
That's the thing... it's only been 12 hours... I pitched into primary last night!
 

cubalz

Beer Whore
Joined
Dec 30, 2013
Messages
953
Reaction score
414
Location
Magnolia, DE
Well then, you could sterilize a wine thief or an auto siphon to poke an opening through the blockage
 
OP
OP
P

privateer35

Member
Joined
Nov 17, 2021
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
Well then, you could sterilize a wine thief or an auto siphon to poke an opening through the blockage
Thanks. I'll give that a shot... but I'm not seeing any bubble activity below that clump so it worries me.
 

Knightshade

<Insert Snarky Comment Here>
HBT Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2020
Messages
1,118
Reaction score
1,446
Location
Over the hill, and through the woods..
How much did you take out to provide headspace? When I've done gallon batches, I'll take out 2 pints. 1 I'll drink, the other I'll dump into a sanitized pint glass, heat up a bit, mix my sugar in and dump back in along with pectic enzyme and yeast nutrient.
 
OP
OP
P

privateer35

Member
Joined
Nov 17, 2021
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
How much did you take out to provide headspace? When I've done gallon batches, I'll take out 2 pints. 1 I'll drink, the other I'll dump into a sanitized pint glass, heat up a bit, mix my sugar in and dump back in along with pectic enzyme and yeast nutrient.
The headspace I left was just below the finger loop of the 1 gallon carboy. I left a little less than what I did in previous batches, but didn't think it would affect anything drastically.
 

Knightshade

<Insert Snarky Comment Here>
HBT Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2020
Messages
1,118
Reaction score
1,446
Location
Over the hill, and through the woods..
The headspace I left was just below the finger loop of the 1 gallon carboy. I left a little less than what I did in previous batches, but didn't think it would affect anything drastically.

Was thinking with a little more headspace that it may not have gotten bunched up at the top?
 

Chalkyt

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Apr 19, 2017
Messages
682
Reaction score
357
Location
Snowy Mountains, Australia
Yep, EC1118 can get pretty enthusiastic. That stuff on top just looks like the gunk that you get from a robust fermentation. I do my primary ferment in an open container in order to give the yeast access to O2 while the population establishes itself and can get an inch or so of that stuff on top (Claude Jolicoeur suggests this approach). It does settle and go away once the robust fermentation quietens down, and that is a good time to rack to secondary under an airlock. I find that doing the primary fermentation in a carboy with airlock ends up just like yours (and cleaning out the airlock is a real pain!).
 
OP
OP
P

privateer35

Member
Joined
Nov 17, 2021
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
Yep, EC1118 can get pretty enthusiastic. That stuff on top just looks like the gunk that you get from a robust fermentation. I do my primary ferment in an open container in order to give the yeast access to O2 while the population establishes itself and can get an inch or so of that stuff on top (Claude Jolicoeur suggests this approach). It does settle and go away once the robust fermentation quietens down, and that is a good time to rack to secondary under an airlock. I find that doing the primary fermentation in a carboy with airlock ends up just like yours (and cleaning out the airlock is a real pain!).

Yup, experiencing that now. Luckily I transitioned to a blow off tube into some sanitized water. For any future EC-1118 batches I'll leave a little more head space to combat the issue.

It's really turned around and is making a ton of bubbles after a slow kick-start. So good so far!
 
Top