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I’ve mentioned this before on HBT, if you have a nearby Culligan check about prepaying for RO water. I do that and it’s 30 cents/gallon. I prepaid $75 for 250 gallons. Each time I go in for water they swipe my card and it deducts the gallon amount. A good deal for those of us who use RO but don’t want an in-house RO system.
It's 45C here. Our big grocery chain used to have RO for 15C but everything is Alkaline water now. Stupid people. How does raising your stomach pH do any good? 🤔
 
6C240CA8-C010-4174-803E-E814AA495C5C.jpeg

Nitro cold brew for two.
 
Potosi Brewery, Potosi, Wisconsin.

Photo #1: Sampler of two pale ales, two Continental lagers, two American (non-hazy) IPAs.

Photo #2: The best burger I’ve had in a long time.
Story behind the photos:

A few weeks ago I was watching Lester Holt on the NBC National News. For the ‘happy talk’ closing story he was in Potosi, WI, at a brewery in this small town (pop. 646) that is home to a brewery that had sustained the town for well over a hundred years. Just about everyone in the town had a connection to the bar, and when it was failing 20-25 years ago, the town was also failing and doomed to expire with it.

So the people pitched in to save it. Much had to be scrapped and reimagined. After 10 years of fundraising and sweat equity put in to rebuilding this iconic local landmark, it reopened. It won out in a competition by the American Brewers Association to house its National Brewing Museum, beating out Milwaukee, Chicago and a host of other large metropolitan hopefuls.

I was fascinated by the news story, and as luck would have it, we were headed to upstate Wisconsin anyway for a family wedding. The visit to New Glarus could wait till next time (snagged a case of Spotted Cow nonetheless), so we made this stop on the way home to Maryland. Added bonus: the brewery participates in Harvest Host, so our prairie schooner Duke of Earl Grey made a beeline for this little town along the Mississippi River where we parked overnight for free.

The brewery is (remarkably) thriving, and cranking out some really good beers. The museum has an unbelievable collection of American beer memorabilia, and the facility holds an unbelievable archive records, books and reference materials for research. I spent several hours in the museum, and browsing through the library archives and historical records. It’s a treasure trove.

If you like history and love good beer, you owe it to yourself to put this place on your (Beer) Bucket List. It’s a road trip you’ll not regret.
 
Story behind the photos:

A few weeks ago I was watching Lester Holt on the NBC National News. For the ‘happy talk’ closing story he was in Potosi, WI, at a brewery in this small town (pop. 646) that is home to a brewery that had sustained the town for well over a hundred years. Just about everyone in the town had a connection to the bar, and when it was failing 20-25 years ago, the town was also failing and doomed to expire with it.

So the people pitched in to save it. Much had to be scrapped and reimagined. After 10 years of fundraising and sweat equity put in to rebuilding this iconic local landmark, it reopened. It won out in a competition by the American Brewers Association to house its National Brewing Museum, beating out Milwaukee, Chicago and a host of other large metropolitan hopefuls.

I was fascinated by the news story, and as luck would have it, we were headed to upstate Wisconsin anyway for a family wedding. The visit to New Glarus could wait till next time (snagged a case of Spotted Cow nonetheless), so we made this stop on the way home to Maryland. Added bonus: the brewery participates in Harvest Host, so our prairie schooner Duke of Earl Grey made a beeline for this little town along the Mississippi River where we parked overnight for free.

The brewery is (remarkably) thriving, and cranking out some really good beers. The museum has an unbelievable collection of American beer memorabilia, and the facility holds an unbelievable archive records, books and reference materials for research. I spent several hours in the museum, and browsing through the library archives and historical records. It’s a treasure trove.

If you like history and love good beer, you owe it to yourself to put this place on your (Beer) Bucket List. It’s a road trip you’ll not regret.
Great story. One you don't hear about often. Thanks for sharing!
 
Story behind the photos:

A few weeks ago I was watching Lester Holt on the NBC National News. For the ‘happy talk’ closing story he was in Potosi, WI, at a brewery in this small town (pop. 646) that is home to a brewery that had sustained the town for well over a hundred years. Just about everyone in the town had a connection to the bar, and when it was failing 20-25 years ago, the town was also failing and doomed to expire with it.

So the people pitched in to save it. Much had to be scrapped and reimagined. After 10 years of fundraising and sweat equity put in to rebuilding this iconic local landmark, it reopened. It won out in a competition by the American Brewers Association to house its National Brewing Museum, beating out Milwaukee, Chicago and a host of other large metropolitan hopefuls.

I was fascinated by the news story, and as luck would have it, we were headed to upstate Wisconsin anyway for a family wedding. The visit to New Glarus could wait till next time (snagged a case of Spotted Cow nonetheless), so we made this stop on the way home to Maryland. Added bonus: the brewery participates in Harvest Host, so our prairie schooner Duke of Earl Grey made a beeline for this little town along the Mississippi River where we parked overnight for free.

The brewery is (remarkably) thriving, and cranking out some really good beers. The museum has an unbelievable collection of American beer memorabilia, and the facility holds an unbelievable archive records, books and reference materials for research. I spent several hours in the museum, and browsing through the library archives and historical records. It’s a treasure trove.

If you like history and love good beer, you owe it to yourself to put this place on your (Beer) Bucket List. It’s a road trip you’ll not regret.
Second edit to original post:

As a business, the brewery (and the town) have a pretty steep debt load, which they are servicing. They’re paying the bills, have recruited professional brewing staff, and have a loyal following of locals. They’re even doing some modest but modern improvements to the place.

But here’s the kicker: it’s the only brewery in America (and probably the world) that is a “not for profit” brewery. Every penny earned over expenses goes to charity. That’s unheard of in our capitalistic economy.

So if you’re ever in the vicinity, make it your purpose to go out of the way and pay a visit. The people are friendly, the food is good, the beer is even better, and the experience is one of a kind! 🍺🍔
 
But here’s the kicker: it’s the only brewery in America (and probably the world) that is a “not for profit” brewery. Every penny earned over expenses goes to charity. That’s unheard of in our capitalistic economy.
It's not unheard of, unless you've never heard of it. Newman's Own for instance.

Unfortunately, I don't get up to Wisconsin much.
 
Second edit to original post:

As a business, the brewery (and the town) have a pretty steep debt load, which they are servicing. They’re paying the bills, have recruited professional brewing staff, and have a loyal following of locals. They’re even doing some modest but modern improvements to the place.

But here’s the kicker: it’s the only brewery in America (and probably the world) that is a “not for profit” brewery. Every penny earned over expenses goes to charity. That’s unheard of in our capitalistic economy.

So if you’re ever in the vicinity, make it your purpose to go out of the way and pay a visit. The people are friendly, the food is good, the beer is even better, and the experience is one of a kind! 🍺🍔
How does that work with paying employees, the owners collecting personal "salary", buying equipment/ingredients etc?
If there is a group of people who make their living of it some system of profit must be involved. Or is it some system where everything that is surplus after paying those things is forwarded to charity?
Sorry for loads of questions but that really got my ADHD brain going.
 
Or is it some system where everything that is surplus after paying those things is forwarded to charity?
Pretty much. Not for profit doesn't mean not for money. I spent the last ten years of my career at a non-profit (although we were our own charity). We all got paid. Surplus in good years was re-invested and/or stashed away so that the mission wouldn't suffer in lean years.
 

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