Wells Bombardier English Premium Bitter Clone

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oberonsd73

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Hi There,

I am going to attempt my first mini-mash using the method from BYO. (still need to lacate myself a good 2-gal rubbermaid container, but that's for a different thread)

I'd like to make a English Bitter kinda in the style of Wells Bombardier. (Although, close... but not 100%)

What I have is:
3# Pale Malt(2-row) UK (or Maris Otter??? thoughts??)
.75# British Crystal 55 (main specialty grain according to bottle)
.25# Buscuit Malt (the deviation from the 100% clone)
3# Muntons Light DME (late add)
1oz Challenger 7.5% - 60min
1oz Challenger 7.5% - 20min
1oz Kent Goldings - Aroma
Irish Moss
Yeast Nutrient
Wyeast 1968 (London ESB)

3 gallon boil using the BYO Mini-mash method as mentioned above.

Should I worry about water profiles etc?
Thoughts on anything else?

thanks a bunch!
 

Bob

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If you use Maris Otter, I'd omit the Biscuit Malt.

Anyway, here's the list of ingredients, according to the Bombardier website:

Crystal malt
Challenger hops
Goldings hops

One presumes the existence of pale malt. :D

Bottled Bombardier comes it at 5.2%ABV, so that gives an idea of where to start. Most Premium Bitter consists of pale malt, crystal malt, and an adjunct (usually flaked maize). The website says, "More malt per pint is used in brewing Wells Bombardier than in other premium bitters and the English Crystal malt is carefully crushed, not ground. This delivers the rich flavour and deep copper colour." That doesn't mean it's an all-malt beer; most Bitters are not, and use sugar or unmalted adjuncts or both.

Knowing this, your proposed recipe actually looks pretty good! :) If might not be Bombardier, but it's a hell of a bitter. Your IBU level is high for the style, but that's your concern.

I've read that Muntons lighter extracts are mashed with adjuncts already, so I shouldn't bother with them.

Unfortunately, you're coming out light. Wells specifically states Bombardier in bottles is 5.2% ABV. Your proposed grist rings in at OG ~1.045. If your beer ferments to 1.010 - which is entirely possible - you're looking at 4.4%ABV. You might consider adding a pound of Muntons light DME to boost the gravity to about 1.050, which ought to boost your ABV to the stated amount.

Cheers,

Bob
 

sammo

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whats biscuit malt. ive always found a tiny bit of roast barley really does the trick.
 
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oberonsd73

oberonsd73

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....... That doesn't mean it's an all-malt beer; most Bitters are not, and use sugar or unmalted adjuncts or both. Cheers,...............

Bob
So, if not all-malt... what would you use? Specifically. I'm new to the concept honestly.

thanks for the reply!
 

ajf

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Most Premium Bitter consists of pale malt, crystal malt, and an adjunct (usually flaked maize).
From Designing Great Beers (Ray Daniels),under 30% of English commercial Bitters use corn (maize).

From the taste of the bottled English Bitters that are available in the US, I would agree that many of them may well use corn. From the draught English Premium Bitters that I used to drink in England, I think that the 5 - 6% is much more representative, and I think that most of that usage would be in the Ordinary Bitter category.

-a.
 

Bob

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ajf - Sorry, I forgot about sugar. I should have written "flaked maize or sugar".

:)

I agree that the prevalence of non-malt fermentables is much higher in Ordinary than other Bitters. However, if you read what I quoted from Wells's website, you'll note that there's no reason to believe Bombardier is an all-malt product. Knowing British breweries the way I do, if Bombardier were all-malt they'd tell us unequivocally - it'd be all over the promotional copy!

Bob
 

moeron15

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I gave this recipe a shot a couple of weeks ago. It's in secondary fermentation now and looks/tastes pretty good so far!

 

moeron15

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Had my first taste of this recipe last night. Not bad. Very thick mouthfeel. Hoppy nose and taste (but not overpoweringly hoppy like an IPA). Very drinkable, not very strong. The thick mouthfeel is what stands out to me the most. The head retention isn't great, but not awful either. Not bad for a first try!

 

moeron15

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This stuff aged nicely! It's now completely gone. A couple of changes I'd make for next time (after comparing it side-by-side with a pint of bombardier):
- The color needs to be slightly darker
- The carbonation needs to be increased
- Longer time spent in secondary to help clarify it a bit more

The aroma was dead on. The taste of mine was actually a bit better due to freshness. I think the bottle of Bombardier I had was beginning to turn south. Making the changes indicated above for next batch and I think it'll be a really solid clone!
 

TanLang

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According to CYBI's show where they interview the head brewer, they add rice syrup/malt and Lyle's Golden Syrup ~12-14% of each.
 

Olly

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Hi sorry i am very new to home brewing can someone please explain to me what this all means i would love to try and make this beer.
Many thanks
Oliver
 

BleacherBrewing

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If you use Maris Otter, I'd omit the Biscuit Malt.

Anyway, here's the list of ingredients, according to the Bombardier website:

Crystal malt
Challenger hops
Goldings hops

One presumes the existence of pale malt. :D

Bottled Bombardier comes it at 5.2%ABV, so that gives an idea of where to start. Most Premium Bitter consists of pale malt, crystal malt, and an adjunct (usually flaked maize). The website says, "More malt per pint is used in brewing Wells Bombardier than in other premium bitters and the English Crystal malt is carefully crushed, not ground. This delivers the rich flavour and deep copper colour." That doesn't mean it's an all-malt beer; most Bitters are not, and use sugar or unmalted adjuncts or both.

Knowing this, your proposed recipe actually looks pretty good! :) If might not be Bombardier, but it's a hell of a bitter. Your IBU level is high for the style, but that's your concern.

I've read that Muntons lighter extracts are mashed with adjuncts already, so I shouldn't bother with them.

Unfortunately, you're coming out light. Wells specifically states Bombardier in bottles is 5.2% ABV. Your proposed grist rings in at OG ~1.045. If your beer ferments to 1.010 - which is entirely possible - you're looking at 4.4%ABV. You might consider adding a pound of Muntons light DME to boost the gravity to about 1.050, which ought to boost your ABV to the stated amount.

Cheers,

Bob
Muntons Spraymalt (DME) is 100% malt. No adjuncts.
 
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