Weird fermentation behavior

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Eric Lavoie

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Hi guys, I just kegged my last batch of beer (3 gallon NEIPA fermented about 3 weeks in glass carboy with Escarpment Labs Foggy London Ale yeast).

First, the fermentation did not really went as planned as I got some activity in the airlock but not a lot of foam on top of the wort. The yeast seemed to have floculated very quickly (2-3 days). It did happen to me in the past so I was not that worried. And I know the wort is not the issue because I bought a 6 gallon wort and splitted in two different carboys with different yeasts/dry hop. And the other half is fantastic.

But today, when I racked my beer from the carboy to the keg something unusual happened. I saw bubbles in my syphonning tube the whole time (even if I fill the auto-sypon cylinder with water to prevent such a thing). The bubbles were really coming from the beer itself and I had to stop filling my keg before then end as foam was coming out of it. This is the first time such a thing happens to me and this is were I started worrying a little.

Then once my keg full, I plugged my CO2 tank and put it in my fridge and decided to pour me a drink right away. To my big surprise, the beer had already foam on it and is already carbonated (not a ton and surely not enough yet, but still has some carbonation).

I'm trying to think of what could have caused that. I've been brewing since 4 years (kegging only since March though) but I'm having a tough time finding what went wrong (or at least was different than usual). It was my first time with this yeast and the package was already blown up when I received it (the seller told me it was ok to use it). I didn't do any starter, that may be some thing to do next time.

Do you guys ever had the same experience (already carbonated beer in carboy) or do you have any ideas of what could've happened?

Thank's!
 

hotbeer

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Yes, beer does carbonate itself in the fermenter and not have to be in something that holds pressure. I do frequently have the same experience.

Maybe it's more noticeable when the atmospheric pressure is falling or the temp rising. Probably it's just that you were paying more attention.

Checking what that is, this place says that beer in the FV finishes with 1.2 to 1.7 vols of CO2.
Un-pressurized, finished beer has between 1.2 and 1.7 volumes of CO2 (left over from the fermentation process) while most beer is packaged with 2.3-2.8 volumes of CO2. However, each beer style has a traditional carbonation level - a German Weiss, for example is usually conditioned to 3.2-4.2 volumes. Some beers like stouts and English “real” ales are barely carbonated at all.
Using a carbonation chart


I just kegged my last batch of beer
This sounds a little more dire than you probably meant it. I hope you haven't kegged your last batch of beer!

Unless of course you are switching to bottles.
:bigmug:
 

Broken Crow

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That happens with my favourite ESB...always foam!
Maybe it's more noticeable when the atmospheric pressure is falling or the temp rising.
I know that in the past 18 hours the atmospheric pressure has dropped dramatically because I can barely stand straight (Permanant vertigo - pressure differential in/out dural sac) ..so I seem to be posting everywhere while I'm stuck 'sitting'
:mug:
 
OP
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E

Eric Lavoie

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Yes, beer does carbonate itself in the fermenter and not have to be in something that holds pressure. I do frequently have the same experience.

Maybe it's more noticeable when the atmospheric pressure is falling or the temp rising. Probably it's just that you were paying more attention.

Checking what that is, this place says that beer in the FV finishes with 1.2 to 1.7 vols of CO2.

Using a carbonation chart



This sounds a little more dire than you probably meant it. I hope you haven't kegged your last batch of beer!

Unless of course you are switching to bottles.
:bigmug:
You are right, I should have said: I just kegged my most recent batch of beer. I'm really not regretting switching to kegs at all! :)

Thank's for your answer!
 
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